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  • Collaborative Care for MAT: Evidence-Based Support and New Reimbursement Strategies (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about collaborative care model and reimbursement requirements from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    The Collaborative Care Model of integrated primary and behavioral health care adds a behavioral care manager and addiction specialist to the MAT prescribing team to improve outcomes. This already widely implemented team-based approach to care utilizes key crucial elements from over 90 randomized trials of the model including measurement based care and registry guided changes to treatment for patients who are not improving.  The model has been extensively studied across many psychiatric illnesses including depression and anxiety. Collaborative care has been tested in numerous settings including rural sites and across diverse racial and payer groups and has been found to increase access to effective and evidence-based mental health treatment.  Most recently the SUMMIT (Substance Use Motivation and Medication Integrated Treatment) trial demonstrated using this approach improved engagement in treatment and abstinence from alcohol and drugs at 6 months compared to usual care. New Current Procedural Terminology Codes (CPT) have been developed and released to fund the collaborative care model in primary care settings and offers a unique opportunity to offer this treatment.  This reimbursement mechanism for the crucial behavioral care management tasks that are needed is being utilized nationally to treat a variety of conditions.  The codes have been approved for Medicare, some state Medicaid agencies and with some commercial carriers so the timing is right to get MAT services reimbursement for this robust delivery approach. Some modifications in the model around the key tasks and measurement tools will be necessary in the area of MAT to provide the best level of care and need to be explored more fully. Developing consensus and testing these variations has started and key leaders in the field are exploring what is needed. This session brings together key national leaders with decades of experience in research and implementation of the collaborative care model.  Lori Raney, MD is a Master Trainer through the American Psychiatric Associations Support and Alignment grant from CMMI to train 3,500 psychiatrists in the model and has published extensively on this approach.  Mark Duncan MD is a board certified in both Addiction Psychiatry and Family Medicine and is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Washington the C-Director of the Psychiatry and Addiction Case Conference (Project ECHO).  Virna Little LCSW, Director of the Center for Innovation in Mental Health at the CUNY School of Public Health, is one of the pioneers of integrated behavior health and brings a wealth of expertise and experience with New York’s Zero Overdose and collaborative care implementation efforts. These speakers will describe the collaborative care model and reimbursement requirements and then engage with the audience in smaller group discussions to describe training needs, tracking and workflow changes as well as measurement-based approaches to demonstrating outcomes specific to OUD.  

    Learning Objectives:



    1.) List the core elements of effectiveness of the collaborative care model and the roles of the key team members including the consultant addiction specialist
    2.) Adapt the collaborative care model to MAT for opioid use disorder while maintaining fidelity to the model including appropriate registry tracking with treatment to target.
    3.) Show how the psychiatric collaborative care management CPT codes can be utilized for MAT by capturing key qualifying tasks and processes that lead to successful reimbursement.


    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • How to Critically Appraise Studies to Apply Them in Practice (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning how to critically appraise published addiction medicine research using a standard framework from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    Journal of Addiction Medicine editors will critically appraise published addiction medicine research and facilitate discussions to impart skills of critical appraisal. Participants will be able to assess the validity and applicability of recent impactful published research to decide when to apply findings to clinical practice. We will critically appraise literature using a standard framework. Critical appraisal involves beginning with a clinical question or scenario, assessing whether reported study methods support validity to address the question (specific to whether the question is about treatment, diagnosis or prognosis), noting the results and their precision, and assessing the applicability of the study results to clinical practice. We will lead critical appraisal discussions about recent published addiction medicine research. Each article type has a series of criteria relevant to its critical appraisal and these are the standards to be used in evaluating the research. Participants will be able to apply these to future published work.

    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Conduct a critical appraisal of an addiction medicine research article
    2.) Decide whether to apply reported research results to clinical practice
    3.)Describe the steps taken to determine study validity and applicability


    Richard Saitz

    MD, MPH, DFASAM, FACP

    Richard Saitz MD, MPH, FACP, DFASAM is a general internist (DABIM) and primary care physician, an addiction medicine specialist (DABAM), Chair and Professor of Community Health Sciences at Boston University (BU) School of Public Health, and Professor of Medicine at BU School of Medicine. He Chaired the Treatment and Services review committee for the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, is Associate Editor of JAMA and Senior Editor of Journal of Addiction Medicine, Section Editor and sole author of key chapters in UpToDate on unhealthy substance use, an editor of the ASAM Principles of Addiction Medicine, and author of >200 peer-reviewed publications http://profiles.bu.edu/display/151440 http://www.bu.edu/sph/profile/richard-saitz/ He was Director of Boston Medical Center’s Clinical Addiction Research and Education (CARE) Unit for over a decade, has been Chairman of an Institutional Review Board, Associate Director of Clinical Research for BU, President of the Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA), steering committee member of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers (MINT), and was coordinating committee member of International Network for Brief Intervention for Alcohol and other drug problems (INEBRIA). He is Vice President of the International Society of Addiction Journal Editors (ISAJE). His primary areas of expertise supported by NIH, RWJF, and SAMHSA, are screening and brief intervention, integrating substance-related and general health care, improving the quality of care for people with unhealthy substance use, particularly in general health settings, and basing care on science. He validated single-item screening questions recommended by NIDA and NIAAA. Awards: Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society, Boston Jaycees Ten Outstanding Young Leaders Award, Best Doctors in America®, AMERSA’s W. Anderson Spickard, Jr. Excellence in Mentorship Award, the R. Brinkley Smithers Distinguished Scientist Award (ASAM), Research Society on Alcoholism Distinguished Researcher Award.

    Frank Vocci

    PhD

    Frank J Vocci, PhD;  President and Senior Research Scientist, Friends Research Institute, Inc., Baltimore, Maryland   Following a post-doctoral fellowship in addiction pharmacology at the Medical College of Virginia, Dr. Frank Vocci spent 11 years at the FDA where he reviewed applications for marketing of analgesic medications and also participated in domestic and international drug scheduling issues.  In 1989, he joined the Medications Development Program at the National Institute on Drug Abuse and became the Director of the Division of Pharmacotherapies and Medical Consequences of Drug Abuse (DPMC) in 1997. During his tenure at NIDA, four addiction drug products that were developed or co-developed by his division were approved by the FDA and another was approved following his retirement from NIH in 2010. Following his retirement from NIDA in December 2008 Dr. Vocci became President of Friends Research Institute in January 2009.  He has published over 100 articles and book chapters and has participated as a grant reviewer for the Department of Defense, the Veterans Administration, the National Institutes of Health,  the Brain Research Foundation, and the Peter Dodge Foundation,   He is a Past-President of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence and a co-editor of the Journal of Addiction Medicine. 

    Martha J. Wunsch

    MD, FAAP, DFASAM

    Martha J Wunsch, MD, FAAP , DFASAM is an addiction specialist with The Permanente Medical Group in Northern California. She is the Program Director for the Kaiser Addiction Medicine Fellowship and Medical Director of the San Leandro Hospital Addiction Medicine Consultation and Liaiason Service. Marty earned a medical degree at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland, completed a pediatric internship and residency at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (1983-1986), and practiced general pediatrics in the Indian Health Service in Arizona.

    Dr. Wunsch was the Hoff Addiction Medicine Fellow at Medical College of Virginia/Virginia Commonwealth University (2000-2002). She is a distinguished fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine and a founding co-editor of the Journal of Addiction Medicine. Dr. Wunsch is a founding director of the American Board of Addiction and the President Elect of The Addiction Medicine Foundation.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Chronic Pain and Opioid Use (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about the CBT model and conceptualization for pain and opioid use from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    The epidemic co-occurrence of chronic pain and opioid use has resulted in an expensive ($635B/year) and deadly (72k overdose deaths/year) problem in the U.S. Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) has been successfully used to alleviate suffering for patients who have chronic pain and use opioids with the hope of getting relief. CBT helps patients reduce pain, better tolerate the pain they do have, and rely less on opioid medications for relief (Ehde et al., 2014). CBT also helps patients to cope with cravings and make necessary life changes, so that they rely less on opioids. During this interactive session, accompanied by video-recorded demonstrations and live role-plays, participants will practice CBT techniques that that can be used during medical visits, and psychiatric assessments and med checks. The CBT model and conceptualization for pain and opioid use will be presented and will prepare physicians to use them within the context of medical visits. Additionally, CBT techniques that enhance motivation, facilitate cognitive restructuring, prompt behavioral activation, provide relaxation and mindfulness experiences that collectively develop distress tolerance and better impulse control will be discussed and demonstrated. References: Ehde, D.M., Dillworth, T. M., & Turner, J. A. (2014). Cognitive-behavior therapy for individuals with chronic pain. American Psychologist. 69(2) 153�"166. doi: 10.1037/a0035747  

    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Explain the role of and psychosocial stressors in the development and maintenance of chronic pain and opioid use.
    2.) Include cognitive behavioral techniques in the development of treatment plans.


    3.) Use CBT skills during medical and psychiatric visits to alleviate suffering for patients with chronic pain and opioid use.


    Allen R. Miller

    PhD, MBA

    Allen R. Miller, Ph.D., M.B.A. is a seasoned clinician, trainer, and administrator who provides oversight to the training and clinical services at Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy  as the CBT Program Director. For over twenty-five years, he held leadership positions in a large integrated health system. Throughout his career, he has divided his time among administrative, clinical, and training and supervision responsibilities. As Director of Behavioral Health at WellSpan Behavioral Health, he provided administrative and operational oversight for the behavioral health service line that served hospitals and medical practices within the health system. He served as Chair of Psychology for a 580-bed acute care hospital, and as Chief Psychologist for an APA-approved internship in clinical psychology that he founded. In the internship, Dr. Miller provided training and supervision of essential cognitive and behavioral skills for a population health environment and an adaptation for working in medical settings. For many years, he served on the system’s Clinical Effectiveness Team for Chronic Pain. Utilizing the principles of implementation science, Dr. Miller worked to integrate sustainable CBT programs with primary care and other medical services. He also provided supervision for psychiatry fellows in their use of CBT with children and adolescents. As a clinician, Dr. Miller has used CBT to help people of all ages with a myriad of presenting problems coming from forensic, community, educational, and medical settings. Dr. Miller has conducted workshops, written professional articles and published several resource books for lay readers about personality, depression, anxiety, and stress. He is a Founding Fellow of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy and is a past officer on its Board of Directors.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • My Patients Won't Attend Support Groups. What Should I Do? (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning how to make referrals to support group meetings The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    Self-help groups are essentially free, research validated adjuncts to the professional management of addiction. However, many addiction medicine physicians are unfamiliar with 12-Step meetings and other mutual help organizations. Of those who are familiar, an even smaller number understand how to help patients with SUDs get past the inevitable initial barriers to their use. This workshop is a beginning workshop, designed to help both groups become more comfortable and effective at active referral to self-help groups. Using sequenced role play, this workshop will illustrate common problems and their solutions in making referrals to support group meetings. The workshop will be conducted entirely through role-play, starting with a mock patient in the Preparation or Action Stage of Change who is resistant to using support services. Real time audience question and answer will be permitted, time permitting. The presenters are comfortable with start/stop role play, keeping it lively and interactive. Participants will leave with a deeper understanding of the active referral process, increasing the probability that appropriate patients will avail themselves of this valuable resource

    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Be able to see how resistance to using A.A. and other self-help groups is a normal part of SUD treatment.
    2.) List the most common resistance points patients have to using 12-Step and other support group meetings.
    3.) Describe specific interventions to use for specific sticking points and to respond empathetically to patient concerns in this area.


    Paul H. Earley

    MD, DFASAM

    Dr. Earley has worked in Addiction Medicine for over 30 years. He treats all types of addictive disorders and specializes in the assessment, treatment and management of health care professionals. As a therapist, he works with patients already in recovery, providing long term therapy for those who suffer from this disease. His professional expertise extends to advocacy for professionals before agencies and licensing boards. 

    Dr. Earley is a dynamic speaker and educator; he speaks and trains on topics of addiction, its treatment and addiction among health care professionals. In addition, he trains therapists about the neurobiological basis of psychotherapy. In his travels, he has provided training in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Italy, Iceland and Switzerland.

    He is the author of two books and several research articles on addiction and its treatment. His most recent book, RecoveryMind Training is an innovative and comprehensive process designed to reengineer addiction treatment. He is a contributing author to the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) Textbook: Principles of Addiction Medicine, as author of the chapter: Physician Health Programs and Addiction among Physicians. He is a contributing author to the ASAM Criteria. His work was featured in the documentary series on addiction entitled Close to Home by Bill Moyers.

    Currently, Dr. Earley is the Medical Director of the Georgia Professionals Health Program, Inc., the Physicians Health Program (PHP) for the state of Georgia and the President-elect of the Federation of State Physician Health Programs (FSPHP). Dr. Earley is the current president-elect of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM). He is a Distinguished Fellow of ASAM and has served on the board of ASAM for over 14 years in several capacities.

    Mel Pohl

    MD, DFASAM

    Mel Pohl, MD, DFASAM is a Board Certified Family Practitioner. He is the Medical Director of Las Vegas Recovery Center (LVRC). Dr. Pohl was a major force in developing LVRCs Chronic Pain Recovery Program. He is certified by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM), and a Fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM). Dr. Pohl is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Nevada School of Medicine. He is a nationally known public speaker and co-author of Pain Recovery: How to Find Balance and Reduce Suffering from Chronic Pain (Central Recovery Press, 2009); Pain Recovery for Families: How to Find Balance When Someone Elses Chronic Pain Becomes Your Problem Too (Central Recovery Press, 2010). Dr. Pohl is the author of A Day without Pain (Central Recovery Press, 2008), which won a silver medal from Independent Publisher Book Award in May 2009. His new book writtten with Kathy Ketcham is The Pain Antidote: The Proven Program to Help You Stop Suffering From Chronic Pain, Avoid Addiction to Painkillers - and Reclaim Your Life (DeCapo). Las Vegas Recovery Center- Salary- Medical Director

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Assessing Burnout and Alcohol Use in Medical Students and Practicing Physicians (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning useful interventions for burning out among medical students and practicing physicians from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn: Medical student and practicing physician burnout is often seen in combination with an alcohol use disorder. The problem is significant for both the individuals and for patients under their care. US physicians report higher than normal burnout rates and burnout correlates with alcohol use problems. Specifically, AUDIT-C scores in 15.3% of physicians were consistent with DSM-IV diagnoses of alcohol abuse or dependence, especially for women (21.4% vs. 12.9%). Burnout also correlates with higher BMI, poor sleep, less exercise, and low career satisfaction. The problem likely starts in medical school. Medical students show very high rates of burnout (up to 50%) and suicidal ideation (estimated at 10%). In an older study of medical students, 32.4% met the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for the diagnoses of alcohol abuse/dependence. Alcohol use continues to be problematic during residency as stressors shift more toward an expanding list of ethical, emotional, cognitive and physical challenges related to clinical care. Medical student, resident, and practicing physician burnout coincident with alcohol use impact both personal functioning and patient care. Burnout and alcohol use must be recognized in early medical training before dangerous coping patterns are established and to guide the development of strategies that build resilience to the stresses of clinical practice. Students and practicing physicians are often reluctant to seek help and express concerns; the healthcare professional must be skilled at recognizing a struggling student or colleague and in assessing current coping mechanisms including alcohol use. Until remedies are put in place to decrease stressors or build resilience, medicine needs vigilant colleagues with the skills to recognize burnout and coincident alcohol use in medical students, residents and practicing physicians. The presentation combines multiple teaching methods to establish skills that aid the addiction specialist in identifying and intervening in colleagues with the lethal combination of burnout and alcohol use. Through case studies, audience involvement, and "what if" role-play simulations, participants build an understanding of the causes of burnout, useful interventions, and the potential impact on provider and patient if burnout is not addressed.  

    1.) Identify common symptoms seen in medical students, residents, and practicing physician who are experiencing burnout and utilize a scale to scientifically assess the provider's risk of burnout.
    2.) Develop skills linking burnout assessment and alcohol use assessment to ensure a complete assessment of the medical student, resident, or practicing physician's impairment.
    3.) Offer referral and intervention recommendations to impaired physicians and medical students to address issues related to being burned out and demonstrating risky alcohol use.


    Bradley Tanner

    MD, ME

    Biography Bradley Tanner, MD, ME is Board Certified in Psychiatry and Obesity Medicine.  His expertise as a psychiatrist and neuroscientist directs solutions that apply neuroscience principles and psychological theory to influence decision making, lifestyle change, and self-assessment. Topics of emphasis include reward systems as they impact opioid addiction, physician and medical student burnout, CNS and biome systems that affect nutritional food selection/obesity, risk-taking and alcohol use, and pain control. Following his psychiatric training and subsequent Attending Physician role at the University of Pittsburgh, Dr. Tanner left full-time academia in 1995 to pursue small business solutions and harness the potential of a commercial enterprise to access capital, build close customer relationships, and specifically target customers needs to enhance overall impact. His organization has received over 23M in federal awards in the past 22 years. Dr. Tanner now leverages his unique business, technological, and clinical background to develop and evaluate novel gaming solutions that engage and inspire an audience and simultaneously impact health or skills. Dr. Tanner remains involved in residency training and clinical care as a Clinical Associate Professor Psychiatry at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Dr. Tanner received his MD from the University of Virginia and Bachelors from Dartmouth College from his attendance at Dartmouth and Williams College. His home is in Chapel Hill, NC, but in the winter he can often be found in the mountains of Utah. He can be reached best via email: bradtanner@gmail.com.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • From Policy to Practice: Advanced Practice MAT: Program Development and Evaluation (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about the process of developing MAT, along with the most recent results from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    The Colorado Legislature has funded a two-year program to expand evidenced-based Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) programs in two rural counties. The purpose of this program is to increase access to MAT and expand the MAT workforce to treat Opioid Use Disorders, by creating new MAT services in rural areas that are led by nurse practitioners (NPs) or physician assistants (PAs).  NPs and PAs became eligible to prescribe buprenorphine, one important type of MAT, through new Federal legislation in 2016. This presentation will review our entire process of developing this current program, along with our most recent results. Exploring issues from policy origination and development,  legislative expert panel presentation/advisement, and collaborative work in bill passage and legislative engagement for MAT treatment, we will review the process of the development of this current MAT program. Program planning, recruitment and selection of appropriate agencies for MAT program development will be reviewed with data assessment and activities based on types of organizations applying. MAT program implementation and evaluation of three types of MAT service programs in rural counties in Colorado will then be reviewed. Ongoing development needs as programs progress, clinical and administrative needs and collaborative development of programs, including barriers and facilitators encountered, group work for program management, and systems interactions experienced on a local, state, and national level will be discussed so that those interested can develop, from policy to practice, MAT programs in their home areas. Results to date suggest that the MAT Pilot project has increased service availability through new services in two rural counties, including initiation of buprenorphine MAT at an agency that previously provided methadone which increased MAT service provision from (patients seen increased from 89 patients seen in 2017, to 312 patients in 2018), expansion of MAT services at a community mental health center than previously offered MAT on a limited scale(10 patients seen in 2017, to 379 in 2018) and the development of a completely new MAT service provider in an isolated rural town (0 in 2017, to 60 in 2018). Patients served by the MAT Pilot program have been representative of those affected by the opioid epidemic, with the average patient was 25-34 years old, male (53% vs. 47% female), White non-Hispanic (61%, with 33% Latino/Latina), insured through Medicaid (80%), and single (77%). On average patients had used the ED 1.16 times in the past year and rated their health as good, fair, or poor (76.5%) where scores less than “very good” predict negative health outcomes. Patients additional reported a mix of past treatment history, co-morbid physical and mental health conditions, and problem use of prescription opioids, heroin, or both, with reported improvements in these areas in initial ongoing patient follow-up. 


    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Participants will learn effective policy, financing, and marketing strategies for implementing new MAT services in a rural community with no existing MAT options
    2.) Participants will learn effective strategies for implementing NP/PA-led MAT services as part of a team-based approach to opioid treatment within an existing health care organization
    3.) Participants will learn effective strategies for overcoming obstacles, including distance, insurance coverage, continuity of care, and stigma, to program success and increasing patients’ access to care in rural communities


    Tanya R. Sorrell, PhD

    PMHNP-BC

    Tanya R. Sorrell, PhD, PMHNP-BC, Assistant Professor, University of Colorado- Anschutz Medical Campus. My program of research is informed by my clinical work with vulnerable populations with mental health and substance misuse and use disorders across the lifespan. My specific areas of expertise, as PI and Co-PI include community engagement of non-traditional behavioral health and substance use clients, and using community advisory groups to increase health literacy, access to care, and treatment outcomes in behavioral health/substance use services for underserved urban and rural populations. I am currently the Lead Faculty of a state-wide Colorado Senate Bill funded Pilot Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) Service Delivery Program, a project to enhance access and treatment of substance use in rural Colorado.  I was the PI for a PCORI funded project related to engagement of the community regarding behavioral health needed.  I am the Co-PI for a HRSA funded project that focuses on expanding the behavioral health workforce needs for rural and urban areas of Colorado and New Mexico, using a community engagment, media literacy model. I was awarded the 2017-2018 Junior Scientist Award for my research achievements at the University of Colorado-Anschutz Medical Campus, where I’m an Assistant Professor. I maintain two clinical practices, Sheridan Integrated care clinics (FQHC) in Denver, CO, and Yuma Mental Health in Yuma, AZ serving predominately Latino underserved clients. I serve as the Co-Chair of the Treatment on Demand action group for the Denver County Opiate Task Force, on the Advisory board of the Colorado Leadership Committee for Collective Impact in Substance Use Services (LCCI), the Colorado Consortium for Prescription drug abuse prevention, and the SAMHSA Minority Fellowship Program. My publication record reflects my desires to increase literacy, engagement, and services utilization to improve the overall behavioral health/substance use needs of all underserved populations. 

    Mary Weber

    PhD, PMHNP-BC, FAANP, FAAN

    Mary Weber, PhD, PMHNP-BC, FAANP, FAAN, is a psychiatric nurse practitioner and Endowed Professor in Psychiatric Nursing for the University of Colorado College of Nursing. She has extensive clinical and teaching expertise in chronic mental illness, psychiatric assessment, medication management, and individual/group therapies, having received National Teaching Awards and gained induction into the American Association of Nurse Practitioners and the American Academy of Nursing. She has had grants funded by the Stanley Foundation, HRSA, and SAMHSA, and she has had numerous national presentations and publications. Her research has focused on underserved populations, including the homeless, and those with co-morbid psychiatric, substance, and medical disorders. She was the PI for a SAMHSA funded project, “Nurses Helping Colorado: An SBIRT Training Program.” and was an active participant in a national network of nursing schools implementing similar educational programs to increase the use of SBIRT by nurses in all settings.  She is currently the clinical consultant for a Colorado Senate Bill 74 Implementation of a Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) Service Delivery Program to exand access to MAT in rural areas of Colorado.  

    Paul F. Cook

    PhD

     Paul Cook, PhD, is a clinical psychologist and an associate professor at the University of Colorado College of Nursing. His primary research area is health behavior change, including smoking cessation, medication adherence, and reducing opioid use.He has collaborated with doctors Sorrell and Weber on several studies related to substance use training and treatment.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Cannabidiol as Medicine: Are We There? (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about research to show whether cannabidiol is ready to be used in clinical practice from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    Cannabis is the most abused illicit drug in the world with an estimated 2.5% of the world’s population (180 million) using it regularly (World Drug Report 2017)1. Despite its associated health consequences) (WHO, 2016)2), marijuana as medicine remains the subject of extensive reviews and fierce debates around the globe. Of the 104 cannabinoids present in cannabis, only two-THC and cannabidiol, have been approved as medicine. Neither smoked marijuana or its extract has been approved as medicine. Most recently, cannabidiol (Epidiolex) was approved for the treatment of epilepsy in children. Though research from clinical studies and trials suggests that cannabidiol has a great potential to treat a wide range of clinical conditions including anxiety, depression, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis and others (Khalsa et al. in press, 2018). Much work is still needed to use it as a medicine at this time. In the meantime, it is of paramount importance that addiction physician is made aware of the adverse medical consequences of marijuana and the current limited research available on medicinal value of cannabis or its cannabinoids that are being promoted as medicine. In this presentation, we will present the currently available research on cannabidiol to show whether cannabidiol is ready to be used in clinical practice as being advocated in the lay literature, and the role of addiction physician/psychiatrist in dealing with issues of medicinal marijuana and/or cannabidiol.

    Learning Objectives:

    1.) The participants will learn about the current most clinical research on cannabidiol  
    2.) The participants will learn about the current research on other cannabinoids related to THC/and cannabidiol and judge whether cannabidiol has been sufficiently developed for use in clinical practice.  
    3.) The participants will learn about the role of addiction physician in dealing with patients who demand cannabidiol for treating any of the unapproved clinical conditions that are being promoted. 


    Jag Khalsa

    PhD, MS

    Dr. Jag Khalsa, with about 50 years of experience in drug research, serves as the Chief of the Medical Consequences Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, DHHS; is responsible for developing/administering a national and international program of clinical research on medical and health consequences of drug abuse and co-occurring infections (HIV, HCV, and others). Prior to joining NIDA in 1987, he served for ~10 yrs as a pharmacologist/toxicologist assessing safety (carcinogenic/teratogenic) potential of chemicals [INDs/NDAs] and food additives) and clinical evaluator at FDA. He has published in pharmacology, toxicology, epidemiology and medical journals. He serves on editorial boards of Journals of Addiction Medicine, Research on HIV/AIDS and Palliative Care, Frontiers of Neuroscience, and Clinical Infectious Diseases. He also serves on numerous Federal and NIH level committees including the HHS Viral Hepatitis Implementation Group (VHIG), National Commission on Digestive Diseases and its two sub-committees (Liver Research, Diabetes Research), Federal Task Force on TB, NIH Steering Committee on Centers for AIDS Research. He has received distinguished service awards from the FDA Commissioner, NIDA and NIH Directors, Society of Neuro-Immune-Pharmacology (SNIP), Life Time Achievement Awards from SNIP and International Conference on Molecular Medicine (India) and MIT, India; a commendation from the US Congress, Awards of Merit from the International Society of Addiction Medicine (ISAM), the President of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), and a Certificate of Appreciation from the Office of Assistant Secretary for Health (Drs. Howard Koh and Ron Valdiserri), DHHS. He has a Ph.D. in neuro-psycho-pharmacology, a Master's degree in herbal pharmacology/medicine, post-doctoral training in CNS/Cardiovascular pharmacology at SK&F, and Toxicology at SRI International. E-mail: jk98p@nih.gov

    Gregory Bunt

    MD, FASAM, FISAM

    Dr. Gregory Bunt graduated medical school in 1983 from NYU School of Medicine, and completed his residency in Psychiatry at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in 1987. He was among the first to complete the Fellowship in Addiction Psychiatry at NYU School of Medicine (1989), and has since been on the NYU Medical School Faculty in the Division of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse, currently as an Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry. He is a diplomat of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology with Special Added Qualifications in Addiction Psychiatry and a Fellow of the International Society of Addiction Medicine.Dr. Bunt is the Immediate Past President of the New York Society of Addiction Medicine and the Immediate Past President of the International Society of Addiction Medicine. He has been the Medical Director for Daytop Village and Daytop International for over 25 years. He has authored over a dozen publications, and speaks nationally and internationally about addiction medicine and therapeutic communities.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Immediate Access Addiction Care: The Evolution of a Low Threshold Bridge Clinic (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about the evolution of Massachusetts General Hospital Bridge Clinic as well as concrete tools to start their own Bridge Clinic from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    The Massachusetts General Hospital Bridge clinic is a multidisciplinary, immediate access low threshold transitional clinic which has provided over 9000 visits to patients since opening in 2016.   Initially a part-time clinic, we have rapidly expanded our model to meet the needs of the complex patient population we service. This has included expanding our hours to  7 days per week, and soon to start evening hours, and enhancing the range of services we offer, including medication management, recovery coaching, optional psychotherapy, psychopharmacology, and peer-support and psychoeducation groups to individuals unable to access care in the community.  From the beginning, our primary goal has been to engage people by “meeting them where they are," and to initiate pharmacotherapy, followed by stabilization and eventual linkage to community based treatment. As we have better understood the needs of our population our strategies for meeting this goal have evolved.  The Bridge clinic was initially established to serve in a complementary role to an inpatient addiction consult team (ACT). However as clinical need has grown we have expanded to partner closely with the emergency department, the obstetrics department, palliative care and oncology, as well as all other outpatient departments. The Bridge Clinic also provides a "consult and return model" for complex patients cared for in the MGH primary care clinics who need stabilization in a low threshold environment and provides  mentorship for newly waivered buprenorphine providers and trainees.  This focus session will describe the evolution of our Bridge Clinic model including lessons learned and the reasons for the changes made, a thorough review of outcomes, and the nuts and bolts needed to start and run this type of clinic model, providing attendees with concrete tools to start their own Bridge Clinic.  

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Describe the need for urgent access, low threshold models that provide immediate pharmacotherapy and flexible, individualized care for all patients, including those post-overdose, discharge from hospital, detox or incarceration 
    2.) Review the evolution of the Massachusetts General Hospital Bridge model of care, lessons learned, and how we modified the model in response to those lessons
    3.) Develop a blueprint for starting a bridge clinic including how to attain stakeholder buy-in, craft a business plan, determine staffing, design a clinical model, decide what services should be offered, and how to measure outcomes


    Laura G. Kehoe

    MD, MPH, FASAM

    Dr. Kehoe is an Assistant Physician at Massachusetts General Hospital and an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and is board certified in both Internal Medicine and Addiction Medicine.  She attended Tufts University School of Medicine and Boston University School of Public Health and completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital.   At Massachusetts General Hospital, she is the Medical Director of the Substance Use Disorder Bridge Clinic, an immediate access, urgent care addiction program.   She is actively involved in medical student and resident education as an attending physician on the inpatient Addiction Consult Team (ACT), and she is the co-chair of the hospital-wide Substance Use Disorder Education Committee, where she works with other team members to expand evidence-based treatment of patients with addiction. 

    Outside of MGH, she was the Medical Director of Baycove Treatment Center for Opiate Addictions Methadone Maintenance program and she treats patients as part of a multidisciplinary addiction team at the supportive housing and outpatient non-profit, Right Turn.   Lastly, Dr. Kehoe is a founding member of W.A.T.E.R.town (Watertown Access to Treatment Education and Recovery), a community coalition working to expand prevention, intervention and treatment for people with substance use disorder in Watertown, MA.

    Sarah Wakeman

    MD, FASAM

    Sarah E. Wakeman, MD is the Medical Director for the Mass General Hospital Substance Use Disorder Initiative, program director of the Mass General Addiction Medicine fellowship, and an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. She is also the Medical Director of the Mass General Hospital Addiction Consult Team, co-chair of the Mass General Opioid Task Force, and clinical lead of the Partners Healthcare Substance Use Disorder Initiative. She is the Medical Director of RIZE Massachusetts, a state-wide, private sector initiative created to build a $50 million fund to implement and evaluate innovative interventions to address the opioid overdose crisis. She received her A.B. from Brown University and her M.D. from Brown Medical School. She completed residency training in internal medicine and served as Chief Medical Resident at Mass General Hospital. She is a diplomate and fellow of the American Board of Addiction Medicine. She is chair of the policy committee for the Massachusetts Society of Addiction Medicine. She served on Massachusetts' Governor Baker’s Opioid Addiction Working Group. Nationally, she is chair of the American Society of Addiction Medicine Drug Court Task Force and serves on their ethics committee.Clinically she provides specialty addiction and general medical care in the inpatient and outpatient setting at Mass General Hospital and the Mass General Charlestown Health Center. Her research interests include evaluating models for integrated substance use disorder treatment in medical settings, recovery coaching, physician attitudes and practice related to substance use disorder, and screening for substance use in primary care.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Guidance From a 24/7 Opioid Treatment Program (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about important elements of attracting and retaining OUD patients in treatment in their community​ from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    In October of 2018, Community Medical Services opened the Nation’s first Opioid Treatment on Demand (OTOD) clinic. The concept of this clinic was developed out of necessity to provide access to treatment for clients without time constraints and to facilitate warm hand-off referrals from high-risk touch-points such as hospitals, police, fire departments, emergency medical services, and jails. Since expanding to a 24/7 model, Community Medical Services has conducted over 3500 intakes outside of normal business hours. More importantly, this framework provided the ability to pioneer community initiatives to support referrals at all hours of the day and access to treatment for those in need. The presentation will provide an in-depth analysis around data collected from over a year of operations of OTOD and innovative programs developed with places of high rates of opioid encounters. Attendees will analyze data collected over the first year and a half of operations for the Nation’s first Opioid Treatment on Demand (OTOD) clinic. Attendees will be provided an understanding of the organizational and staffing needs to conduct an OTOD. Audience members will be able to identify and brainstorm gaps in treatment in their own communities that 24/7 services could support for client referrals and system partner support. These system partners can include hospitals, prisons, jails, police, EMS, fire departments, and state family and children services.  Attendees will be able to understand the most important elements of attracting and retaining patients in treatment  in their community who have Opioid Use Disorders.

    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Recite and discuss the Opioid Treatment on Demand Model (OTOD). This will include staffing needs, security, community cohesion, licensure, medication delivery, system partner support, etc.
    2.) Summarize and analyze multiple data points. The number of treatment attempts before in-taking at the OTOD, what time of the day people seek treatment, what day of the week, geographical location, referral source, history of use, etc.. 
    3.) Identify high-risk touch points for people having negative opioid related encounters and how to integrate with the agencies responding to those encounters.


    Charrisa Riggs

    FNP-C

    Charrisa Riggs, FNP-C, Medical Operations Coordinator with Community Medical Services, earned her Master of Science in Nursing from Northern Arizona University in 2015, and her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Arizona State University in 2008. Mrs. Riggs practices at Community Medical Services, a medication-assisted treatment center, treating patients with opioid use disorders. As a nurse practitioner, Mrs. Riggs also operates her own mobile allergy testing and immunotherapy clinic with a focus on corporate health.   

    Robert Sherrick

    MD, FASAM

    Dr. Robert Sherrick, MD, FASAM, is Chief Medical Officer for Community Medical Services, a company that serves patients through its 30 Opioid Treatment Programs in 8 different states.  Dr. Sherrick completed medical training and residency in Internal Medicine at George Washington University.  After 5 years on the faculty at George Washington,he moved to Montana to join a private practice in Internal Medicine.  Since 1994, Dr. Sherrick has worked at an inpatient addiction treatment facility, Pathways, where he has treated all forms of Substance Use Disorders and has served as the CD Medical Director. Dr. Sherrick has been providing Medication Assisted Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder since 2003, initially in an office setting using buprenorphine and naltrexone.  In 2009, Dr. Sherrick closed his private practice and moved to VA Montana.  Over the next 7 years at VA Montana he developed a state-wide MAT program that was one of the first uses of telemedicine for providing MAT to rural areas.  Dr. Sherrick has been working for Community Medical Services since 2010, providing MAT services with methadone, buprenorphine, and naloxone as well as serving as Northern Medical Director.  He has been Chief Medical Officer for the last year.  He is currently the President of the Northwest Chapter of ASAM. He is Board Certified in Addiction Medicine through the American Board of Preventative Medicine.

    Mark Stavros

    MD, FASAM, FACEP

    Mark Stavros, MD, FASAM, FACEP: Dr. Stavros is board certified in both Emergency Medicine and Addiction Medicine.  He is medical director of Access Recovery Solutions and Gulf Coast Addiction Medicine within Florida focused on the treatment of patients in the community and those in the prison system dealing with opioid use disorder.  He serves as Chief Medical Officer for Maric Healthcare that provides treatment for patients suffering from opioid addiction.  He serves as the Arizona Medical Director for Community Medical Services which treats patients with opiate addiction in Arizona.  He is Clinical Associate Professor and Education Director of Emergency Medicine at FSU College of Medicine.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Improving Medical Education In Substance Use Disorders (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning screening, brief Interventions, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) training​ from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    Despite significant physical, mental and social impairments associated with SUDs, only about 10% of people needing treatment for SUDs receive the help they need. This shortfall is perpetuated by physicians feeling unprepared to make the SUD diagnosis, as well as being unfamiliar with next steps to take once the SUD is identified. Furthermore, many providers do not prefer working with individuals with SUD and pass along negative perceptions to trainees. For example, attitudes of medical trainees farther along in training have been found to be more negative toward individuals with alcohol use disorder than those of first-year medical students, presumably in part due to witnessing stigmatizing behaviors of senior colleagues.  While medication-assisted treatment programs and harm reduction approaches are recently receiving much national attention, there is relatively little focus on improving medical training on SUDs. Curricula lack sufficient instruction and experiences in addiction medicine spanning the continuum of medical education, from medical school through residency and fellowship training programs. Programs that have successfully changed students’ attitudes and skills for treatment of addicted patients continue to be exceptional and limited in focus rather than the general practice in U.S. medical schools.  Several barriers add to the lack of training efforts, including physician attitudes, societal stigma, and skill deficits.  Despite such barriers, however, effective methods exist for incorporating SUD training into each level medical training. Such training may occur in a variety of formats, ranging from online to experiential, and individually to classroom-based. This session will describe recent efforts in providing Screening, Brief Interventions, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) training to all medical students, offering buprenorphine training to residents, using standardized patients and interactive sessions to learn and practice Motivational Interviewing skills, and other efforts to provide effective and sustainable SUD education to medical trainees. In addition, we will address skillful methods for addressing provider bias and societal stigma regarding SUD at different levels of medical training. We will invite interactive discussion regarding educational modules and interventions that can be implemented into different levels of medical training curricula, with the goal of creating enduring training opportunities and curricula in each stage of medical education and ensuring a future in which physicians are competent and compassionate in caring for patients with SUD.  

    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Understand existing barriers on educating medical trainees about substance use disorders (SUD). 
    2.) Describe structured methods for incorporating SUD training along the continuum of medical education, including medical schools, residencies, fellowships, and faculty development programs. 
    3.) Identify common misperceptions about SUD and discuss methods for addressing stigma in medical education programs.   


    Thersilla Oberbarnscheidt

    MD PhD

    Thersilla Oberbarnscheidt is a current Fellow at the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic at the University of Pittsburgh. She completed her residency at Central Michigan University in Psychiatry and her graduated Medical School from the Christian-Albrechts University in Germany as well as Yale University School of Medicine, USA.  She achieved her PhD in neuroscience with "cum laude" at the Christian-Albrechts University with the thesis  "The effect of phenazone in the acute migraine attack". Her medical background is Internal Medicine in her home country Germany as well as Pain Management. In the US she is a ABPN certified Psychiatrist, currently specilizing in Addiction Psychiatry. Thersilla has a long-standing interest in the field of Addiction and has published numerous articles in the field as well as presented nationally and internationally. Her particular interest is in Marijuana and Opioids.

    Priyanka Amin

    MD

    Priyanka Amin, MD, is a PGY4 psychiatry resident at UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital. She is currently the Chief Resident for Well-Being Initiatives. After graduation, she will be working as the inpatient attending at the Behavioral Health Intensive Care Unit as well as the psychiatric emergency department at UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital. She completed undergraduate at Duke University and medical school at the University of Pittsburgh. 

    Jody B. Glance

    MD

    Jody Glance, MD is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. She is the Medical Director of Addiction Medicine Services at Western Psychiatric Hospital of UPMC and is a Fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. She serves as the Associate Director of Medical Student Education for the Department of Psychiatry and is involved in many community efforts to educate the public about substance use disorders. Her academic and clinical interests include co-occurring substance use and psychiatric disorders, substance use disorders in pregnancy, and women’s mental health.

    Jin Cheng

    MD

    Jin Cheng MD, Im currently a addiction psychiatry fellow at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center , Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic. I graduated from Lousiana health science center Shreveport with my medical degree. I've served as the chief resident for the combined family medicine and psychiatry residency at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. 

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.