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  • Opioid and Alcohol Use Disorders in Older Adults: Working Group Guideline Development (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about methods used to review literature on the assessment and treatment of alcohol and opioid use disorders in older adults from this conference recording at The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn how alcohol has now surpassed tobacco as the leading cause of hospital admission in some Canadian provinces, yet alcohol use disorders among those 65 and older often go unidentified and untreated. In addition, older adults are over-represented among Canadians who have had fatal or non-fatal opioid overdoses , yet identification and treatment of opioid use disorders as well as appropriate use of opioids for chronic non-cancer pain remain a challenge for many clinicians. 

    The Canadian Coalition for Seniors Mental Health (CCSMH) has been tasked by Health Canada to develop guidelines for the assessment and treatment of four substance use disorders in older adults (alcohol, opioids, cannabis, and benzodiazepines). As part of guideline development, input is needed from peers working and researching in the field. In this interactive workshop Drs. Rieb and Butt will present a brief overview of the methods used to review literature on the assessment and treatment of alcohol and opioid use disorders in older adults, then share draft guidelines developed by the working groups of the CCSMH. Workshop participants will be encouraged to give feedback and share clinical and research findings to augment the guidelines. Physicians, nurse practitioners, counselors, psychologists, researchers, administrators, and older adults in recovery are among those encouraged to attend for a lively discussion.

    Launette Marie Rieb

    MD, MSc, CCFP, FCFP, DABAM, FASAM

    Dr. Launette Rieb is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Family Practice at the University of British Columbia (UBC), Canada. She is a Family Physician and diplomat of The American Board of Addiction Medicine. She did her graduate work in the area of pain physiology. She completed a postgraduate UBC Clinical Scholar's Program in 2015 and a NIDA sponsored Canadian Addiction Medicine Research Fellowship in 2016 resulting in publication on a newly described opioid pain phenomenon - withdrawal-associated injury-site pain (WISP). She has also published on fentanyl and heroin overdose deaths in BC, as well as on addiction in a variety of marginalized populations. Dr. Rieb is the Medical Director of a multidisciplinary team at OrionHealth (Vancouver Pain Clinic), and works as a consultant for the Rapid Access Addictions Clinic at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver. In addition, she does addiction medicine consultations for The Orchard Recovery Centre, on Bowen Island. Dr. Rieb has taught addiction medicine in the undergraduate and postgraduate medical programs at UBC, and at national and international conferences for 24 years. Dr. Rieb was the co-creator and initial Physician Director of the St. Paul’s Hospital Goldcorp Addiction Medicine Fellowship (now the BC Centre on Substance Use Addiction Medicine Fellowship). She is a member of the Canadian Society of Addiction Medicine’s Education Committee and the College of Family Physician of Canada's Competency Creation Working Group for the Certificate of Added Competency in Addiction Medicine. Dr. Rieb is the past recipient of a UBC Faculty of Medicine Post Graduate Teaching Award. 

    Peter R. Butt

    MD, CCFP, FCFP

    Dr. Peter Butt is a graduate of McMaster University and a Certificant and Fellow with the College of Family Physicians of Canada.  He is an Associate Professor in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Saskatchewan in a position dedicated to Addiction Medicine, and serves as a consultant to Mental Health and Addictions in the Saskatoon Health Region.  National committee work includes the National Alcohol Strategy Advisory Committee, chair of the Canadian Alcohol Low Risk Drinking Guidelines Expert Advisory Group, co-chair of the Standard Drink Label Working Group, and member of the National Recovery Advisory Committee for the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse; and physician lead on the Alcohol Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral project for the College of Family Physicians of Canada.  Provincially he is the physician lead on the Saskatchewan provincial “Take Home Naloxone”project, chairs the Opioid Advisory Committee for the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Saskatchewan, and serves on the Health Canada - First Nation Prescription Drug Abuse Initiative.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Using Alcohol Biomarkers to Guide Pharmacotherapy for Alcohol Use Disorder (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while reviewing the evidence for the use of phosphatidylethanol (PEth) and other biomarkers in the treatment of AUDs in persons living with HIV. Interventions will include both behavioral and pharmacological treatments, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn that clinicians can use several biochemical measurements to objectively assess patients’ current or past alcohol use. However, none of these currently available biomarkers, including measures of various liver enzymes and blood volume, are ideal. Several more experimental markers hold promise for measuring acute alcohol consumption and relapse. These include certain alcohol byproducts, such as phosphatidylethanol, acetaldehyde, ethyl glucuronide (EtG), and fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE), as well as two measures of sialic acid, a carbohydrate that appears to be altered in alcoholics.

    This symposium will provide an update on the use of alcohol biomarkers in general clinical practice, with special emphasis on:

    1. the use of alcohol biomarkers as a guide to the diagnosis and treatment of AUD in primary care settings; 
    2. the use of phosphatidylethanol (PEth) testing as a guide to treatment in patients with co-occurring HIV/AIDS and AUD; and 
    3. the use of alcohol biosensors to monitor response to treatment in both specialty and non-specialty treatment settings.

    Deidra Y. Roach

    MD

    Dr. Roach has more than 30 years of experience in the field of addiction treatment. She currently serves as a Program Director for the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism where, among other responsibilities, she manages research portfolios addressing the treatment of co-occurring mental health and alcohol use disorders and alcohol-related HIV/AIDS among women. She also serves on the Interagency Coordinating Committee on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (ICCFASD) and the NIH Coordinating Committee for Research on Women’s Health. Dr. Roach chairs the Women Drinking, and Pregnancy Work Group of the ICCFASD.

    Scott H. Stewart

    MD, MS

    Scott H. Stewart, MD, MS, Associate Professor, Division of General Internal Medicine, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo. 

    Dr. Stewart is a general internist and adult primary care physician, currently teaching and practicing at the Erie County Medical Center, an academic urban safety-net hospital in Buffalo, NY.   After graduating medical school at Temple University in 1993 and completing Internal Medicine training at the University of Pittsburgh in 1996,Dr. Stewart worked for three years in private practice in the beautiful state of Maine, then returned to academia and completed a health services research fellowship at MUSC in Charleston, SC. He has been on the faculty of MUSC and the University at Buffalo since 2001. Working with experienced mentors at the Charleston Alcohol Research Center at MUSC and Research Institute on Addictions in Buffalo early in his research career helped in melding his long-standing interest in alcohol-related problems with scholarly efforts, leading to NIAAA support. 

    Dr. Stewart believes that objective testing and monitoring is needed to optimize AUD treatment in primary care, similar to other chronic conditions such as diabetes and dyslipidemia. While traditional alcohol consumption biomarkers suffer from limited sensitivity or specificity, and self-report screens are subject to error, relatively newer biomarkers have great potential to guide AUD treatment. Accordingly, a point of my foci has been on the use of carbohydrate-deficient transferrin and newer biomarkers (e.g., blood phosphatidylethanol, ethyl glucuronide) in various patient populations and during alcoholism treatment trials. Dr. Stewart believes biomarker development is a complicated and slow process, but these and other laboratory tests will continue to alter how AUD is detected and monitored in medical settings in the coming years.

    Judith Hahn

    PhD

    Judy Hahn, PhD is an Associate Professor in the HIV, ID, and Global Medicine Division in the Department of Medicine at UCSF. She is an epidemiologist with extensive experience studying the behavioral and biological intersections of substance use and infectious diseases. She is a pioneer in the use of biological markers as objective measures for alcohol use. She has received numerous grant awards from the NIH and has published over 100 manuscripts. 

    She is currently leading studies to examine the safety and cost-benefit ratios of using isoniazid to prevent active TB among HIV/TB co-infected drinkers in Uganda, interventions to improve the safety of INH delivered to this population, as well as using mobile phones and tablets to reduce the harm associated with heavy alcohol use. Judy is also a long-time investigator on the UFO Study of HCV in young persons who inject drugs in San Francisco.

    M. Katherine Jung

    PhD

    M. Katherine Jung, PhD, is the Director of the Division of Metabolism and Health Effects (DMHE) in the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). DMHE oversees a portfolio on the role of alcohol on organ damage, and the mechanisms of alcohol’s effect on physiology and pathology. Dr. Jung’s training and research experience are in biochemistry, cell biology, and molecular biology. Her peer-reviewed publications span the the areas of alcohol-induced organ damage, cell biology, cancer biology, and drug discovery. She has a longstanding interest in biomarkers of alcohol consumption and of alcohol-associated organ damage. Dr. Jung co-leads the Wearable Alcohol Biosensor initiative for NIAAA.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Current Trends of Novel Psychoactive Substance Use and Abuse (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning that there continues to be widespread use of novel psychoactive substances (NPS) with the number of different novel active substances increasing worldwide every year, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn there continues to be widespread use of novel psychoactive substances (NPS) with the number of different novel psychoactive substances increasing worldwide every year. Understanding global trends is important as new agents are often used or “piloted” in other countries before they become popular in the United States. 

    Between the years of 2009 and 2016, 739 different NPS were reported by 106 countries to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNDOC) (“World Drug Report 2017” 2017). In 2015, the majority of NPS reported to UNODC were synthetic stimulants including cathinones and phenethylamines (36%) and synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists (32%) (“World Drug Report 2017” 2017) . Equally concerning is the occurrence of “mini epidemics” associated with synthetic drugs leading to hospitalization of multiple users at a time (Monte et al. 2014). 46 clusters of adverse drug events were reported in the US related to synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists between 2012 and 2015 (Trecki, Gerona, and Schwartz 2015). 

    Yet, identifying the drugs responsible for these “mini-epidemics” is often challenging due to the challenges involved with laboratory testing. Indeed patients in treatment for substance use disorders may be using NPS particularly due to the difficulty in detection (Wiegand 2015) as development of laboratory assays cannot keep up with the development of new substances, and cost of testing may be prohibitive to substance use disorder treatment centers. 

    Recognition of use of NPS is thus often based on clinical evaluation (Ninnemann et al. 2016), and best practices for treatment of acute toxicity or chronic use are not well defined (Monte et al. 2017; Ninnemann et al. 2016). It is important for providers in the field of addiction to understand the evolution of novel psychoactive substances, who is using them, signs and treatment of acute toxicity, available laboratory testing, and what is known about long-term sequelae from use of these agents including the potential for addictive disorders (Montanari et al. 2017) and withdrawal in chronic use (Nacca et al. 2013). This knowledge will allow providers to identify and manage patients at risk from complications of use of these substances.

    JoAn Laes

    MD

    JoAn Laes, MD, Attending Physician, Division of Addiction Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN; Core Medical Toxicology Faculty, Minnesota Poison Control System, Minneapolis, MN; Medical Director, Mission Detox Center, Plymouth, MN and 1800 Detox, Minneapolis, MN, ASAM Medical Toxicology workgroup Chair.Dr. Laes' practice is focused on inpatient addiction medicine and toxicology consultation and outpatient treatment of opioid and other substance use disorders. She is board certified in Internal Medicine, Addiction Medicine, and Medical Toxicology. She completed internal medicine residency at Hennepin County Medical Center and medical toxicology fellowship at Regions Hospital in St. Paul, Minnesota.

    Christine Murphy

    MD

    Dr. Christine Murphy is an Associate Professor in Emergency Medicine and Medical Toxicologist at Carolinas Healthcare System in Charlotte, North Carolina. Dr. Murphy is the Director for the Medical Toxicology Fellowship Program. She received both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in chemistry from the College of William and Mary and her medical degree from the Medical College of Virginia. She completed her residency training in Emergency Medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University and a fellowship in Medical Toxicology at Carolinas Medical Center. Dr. Murphy is board certified in Emergency Medicine, Medical Toxicology, and Addiction Medicine. Her current research interests include alternative uses for existing antidotes, pediatric addiction, and trends in recreational drugs of abuse.

    Matthew Peter Stripp

    MD

    Dr. Matthew Stripp is a Junior Faculty Member in Emergency Medicine and a Medical Toxicology Fellow at Carolinas Healthcare System in Charlotte, NC. He received his BA in Cell/Molecular Biology with an emphasis in Neuroscience at Washington & Jefferson College in Washington, PA. He received his medical degree at Temple University School of Medicine in Philadelphia, PA. He completed his residency training in Emergency Medicine at Northwell Health in Manhasset, NY. Dr. Stripp is board certified in Emergency Medicine. His current research interests include mushroom toxicity, synthetic cannabinoids, and other emerging drugs of abuse.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Advocating for Treatment and Patients at the State Level (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning more about advocacy, legislative, and regulatory efforts on Addiction Medicine policy at the state and federal level from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn that with the opioid misuse and overdose epidemic continuing to progress across the country, federal and state governments alike are swiftly passing legislation and implementing regulations to address opioid prescribing, access to treatment, parity, and other issues that impact the addiction medicine field. 

    Since the beginning of 2017, the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) has dedicated resources to assisting our state chapters with responding to or leading these legislative and regulatory efforts at the state level. From submitting letters of support for and opposition to legislation, commenting on regulations and Governor initiatives, or testifying at committee hearings and agency meetings, ASAM members have been taking advantage of the opportunity to be a part of the discussion. 

    Several states have been more aggressive in addressing this issue than others and the ASAM chapters in those states have interacted with state legislators and agency officials more frequently this past year. Thus, these chapters have insight into how these processes and interactions work that can benefit other chapter officers and members. 

    This workshop will:

    1. review several case studies of state chapter advocacy action related to addiction medicine policy;
    2. review what chapter presidents did with regards to state advocacy, including how they engaged ASAM’s national office, their local members, and elected officials; how they worked with other local advocates and stakeholders to affect positive policy changes; 
    3. describe the overall successes experienced and improvements that are needed in advocacy at the state level.

    The workshop will close with a question-and-answer session that allows members in the audience to ask these chapter presidents for guidance and advice on how they and their chapters can be more engaged around state legislation and regulations on addiction medicine.  This is an opportunity for members to learn, first-hand, the best approaches to advocate for policy change that helps patients and provides addiction specialists the discretion to do their job in order to provide the highest quality treatment.

    Brad Bachman

    State Advocacy and Government Relations Manager

    Brad Bachman is the Manager of State Government Relations for the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM). Prior to joining ASAM, he was a legislative aide in the Maryland Senate and worked on several state and federal campaigns. At the beginning of his time at ASAM, Brad assisted the Director of Advocacy and Government Relations with tracking and responding to federal legislative and regulatory activity regarding the opioid epidemic, particularly the passage of the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act and the lifting of the buprenorphine patient limit to 275. Since the beginning of this year, he has taken over the expanded advocacy focus of ASAM to include legislative and regulatory responses to the epidemic at the state level. Working in tandem with ASAM state chapters, state medical associations, and other stakeholders, he is helping to ensure that any state law or regulation affecting the practice of addiction medicine or access to addiction treatment is guided by evidence and science. Brad received his bachelor degree in history and political science at The Colorado College.

    Cara A. Poland

    MD, MEd, DFASAM

    Cara Poland, MD, M.Ed, FACP, FASAM was trained in internal medicine at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital in Ann Arbor, Michigan and in addiction medicine at Boston Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts. She has an interest in educating physicians and physicians-in-training to improve care for patients with substance use disorders and alcohol use disorders. She is interested in medical student curriculum development and assessment, student well-being and identifying ways to improve the process of medical training. She is professionally active in multiple societies including acting as the current President of the Michigan Society of Addiction Medicine. She is currently the medical director of a program for treatment of pregnant women with substance use disorders, has a general addiction practice. She is an assistant professor at Michigan State University where she acts as a Learning Society Chief.

    Michael Bierer

    MD, MPH

    Michael F. Bierer MD MPH has been at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) for 30+ years. He holds the ranks of Physician there and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He completed his MD at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx NY in 1985 and his MPH at Harvard School of Public Health in Boston MA in 1989. He completed his Internal Medicine Residency at MGH in 1988 and participated in the Addiction Medicine Fellowship in the Department of Psychiatry at Boston University Medical Center in 2001. He ran the component of Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program based at MGH from 1989-2001, has been providing integrated care for addictions in a hospital-based primary care practice since 2002, and has been a leader in the education of medical housestaff at MGH about drug and alcohol problems. He is part of the new Substance Use Disorders Iinitiative at the hospital. He is former Secretary of MASAM and serves currently as President. He is one of the podcast voices for the New England Journal of Medicine.

    Mark Jorrisch

    MD, DFASAM

    Dr. Jorrisch earned an undergraduate degree in Biology from Union College, Schenectady, New York in 1973.  He went on to finish Medical School at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia in 1977 and completed his residency in internal medicine at the University of Virginia in 1980.  Dr. Jorrisch has had a private practice in internal medicine since 1980 in Louisville, Kentucky and currently has an Addiction Medicine practice with specialization in OAT, including methadone and buprenorphine. 

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • How to (Quickly!) Appraise Whether Study Results Should be Applied in Practice (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning how to bring science into your clinical practice, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018). This session was made available free of charge by an unrestricted educational grant from Wolters Kluwer until 5/16/19.

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn about more about an over-arching ASAM Annual Conference goal: To bring science into clinical practice. It also addresses presenting new scientific research, best practices, and interactive teaching methods. Journal of Addiction Medicine editors will facilitate large and small group discussions to impart skills of critical appraisal of addiction medicine research studies. 

    The main goal of the session is for participants to be able to assess the validity and applicability of published research studies in order to decide when to apply findings in clinical practice. We will accomplish this goal by critically appraising literature using a standard framework supported by worksheets, in large and small group learning formats. 

    Critical appraisal involves beginning with a clinical question or scenario, assessing whether reported study methods support validity to address the question (specific to whether the question is about treatment, diagnosis or prognosis), noting the results and their precision, and assessing the applicability of the study results to clinical practice. We will do this with one or more examples of recent articles in the literature. Small groups will be facilitated by faculty as participants use worksheets to apply the principles to specific articles. Small groups will report out to the larger group to discuss conclusions.

    Richard Saitz

    MD, MPH, DFASAM, FACP

    Richard Saitz MD, MPH, FACP, DFASAM is a general internist (DABIM) and primary care physician, an addiction medicine specialist (DABAM), Chair and Professor of Community Health Sciences at Boston University (BU) School of Public Health, and Professor of Medicine at BU School of Medicine. He Chaired the Treatment and Services review committee for the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, is Associate Editor of JAMA and Senior Editor of Journal of Addiction Medicine, Section Editor and sole author of key chapters in UpToDate on unhealthy substance use, an editor of the ASAM Principles of Addiction Medicine, and author of >200 peer-reviewed publications http://profiles.bu.edu/display/151440 http://www.bu.edu/sph/profile/richard-saitz/ He was Director of Boston Medical Center’s Clinical Addiction Research and Education (CARE) Unit for over a decade, has been Chairman of an Institutional Review Board, Associate Director of Clinical Research for BU, President of the Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA), steering committee member of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers (MINT), and was coordinating committee member of International Network for Brief Intervention for Alcohol and other drug problems (INEBRIA). He is Vice President of the International Society of Addiction Journal Editors (ISAJE). His primary areas of expertise supported by NIH, RWJF, and SAMHSA, are screening and brief intervention, integrating substance-related and general health care, improving the quality of care for people with unhealthy substance use, particularly in general health settings, and basing care on science. He validated single-item screening questions recommended by NIDA and NIAAA. Awards: Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society, Boston Jaycees Ten Outstanding Young Leaders Award, Best Doctors in America®, AMERSA’s W. Anderson Spickard, Jr. Excellence in Mentorship Award, the R. Brinkley Smithers Distinguished Scientist Award (ASAM), Research Society on Alcoholism Distinguished Researcher Award.

    Frank J. Vocci

    PhD

    Frank Vocci, PhD, President and Senior Research Scientist, Friends Research Institute, Baltimore, MD. Following a post-doctoral fellowship in addiction pharmacology at the Medical College of Virginia, Dr. Frank Vocci spent 11 years at the FDA, rising to the level of Chief of the Drug Abuse Staff. At the FDA, he reviewed applications for marketing of medications for analgesic medications and for the treatment of substance abuse disorders. He also participated in domestic and international drug control issues. In 1989, he joined the Medications Development Program at the National Institute on Drug Abuse. He became the Director of the Division of Pharmacotherapies and Medical Consequences of Drug Abuse (DPMC) in 1997 where he was responsible for overseeing research and development activities in medications development for the treatment of addictive disorders. He was also responsible for biomedical research in the medical consequences of drug abuse, primarily AIDS and hepatitis C research. During his tenure, the DPMC collaborated on the development of four addiction drug products that were approved by the FDA. Dr. Vocci has published over 100 articles in neuropharmacology and the treatment of substance abuse and its consequences. In 2001, he received a Meritorious Executive award from President Bush for his management of the NIDA medications development program. Dr. Vocci also received a Distinguished Service Award in 2003 from the College on Problems of Drug Dependence for his contributions to the development of buprenorphine as a treatment for opiate dependence. In 2006 Dr. Vocci received the Vernelle Fox award from the California Society of Addiction Medicine and the FeDerSerD (Italian Addiction Society) award. Dr. Vocci has been a co-editor of the Journal of Addiction Medicine since 2012 and is a past-president of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence.

    Martha J. Wunsch

    MD, FAAP, FASAM

    Martha J Wunsch, MD, FAAP , DFASAM is an addiction specialist with The Permanente Medical Group in Northern California. She is the Program Director for the Kaiser Addiction Medicine Fellowship and Medical Director of the San Leandro Hospital Addiction Medicine Consultation and Liaiason Service. Marty earned a medical degree at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland, completed a pediatric internship and residency at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (1983-1986), and practiced general pediatrics in the Indian Health Service in Arizona.

    Dr. Wunsch was the Hoff Addiction Medicine Fellow at Medical College of Virginia/Virginia Commonwealth University (2000-2002). She is a distinguished fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine and a founding co-editor of the Journal of Addiction Medicine. Dr. Wunsch is a founding director of the American Board of Addiction and the President Elect of The Addiction Medicine Foundation.

    Howard B. Moss

    MD

    Howard B. Moss, M.D. is Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Neurosciences at the University of California at Riverside, and Co-Editor of the Journal of Addiction Medicine. He is a board-certified psychiatrist with added qualifications in the subspecialty of Addiction Psychiatry, and is the former Associate Director for Clinical and Translational Research at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. He has authored over 165 peer-reviewed scientific journal publications and three books. He has been Professor of Psychiatry at University of Pennsylvania, Temple University, and the University of Pittsburgh prior to assuming his role at N.I.H., and has held a Senior Scientist Award from National Institute on Drug Abuse. His research has focused on the clinical manifestations of substance use disorders, their etiology, and the intergenerational transmission of risk and resilience. This work has employed diverse methodologies that include psychiatric epidemiology, advanced statistical methods, neurochemistry/neuropharmacology, psychophysiology, biomarker development, neuroimaging, and molecular and behavioral genetics.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Implementing MAT into Federally Qualified Health Centers: Challenges and Solutions (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about different models of office-based opioid treatment, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn about how the growing opioid epidemic has appropriately led to calls for primary care providers to offer medication assisted treatment in office-based settings. Federal and state funding opportunities have allowed Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) - safety net community health centers- to be able to introduce or expand existing MAT services. 

    However, many FQHC systems are new to addiction medicine and to MAT, and few have the opportunity to meet with individuals from other systems to discuss challenges and potential solutions in developing an effective evidence-based program. This session will allow for health providers from FQHCs around the country to come together to learn from each other and from the presenters/facilitators. The session organizers will open the session by discussing different models of office based opioid treatment. They will also describe the challenges they see many health systems struggle with when initiating a new office-based MAT program and describe solutions that they’ve seen effectively executed. 

    The second half of the session will be spent in small groups that will discuss challenges in implementing and integrated MAT into existing FQHC programming. Group members will work together to share their own experiences and discuss potential solutions. 

    The session organizers have relevant experiences that position them well to lead this workshop. 

    • Dr. Rachel King serves as the Medical Director of Project ECHO at Boston Medical Center, which leverages technology to educate FQHC primary care teams around the country about addiction treatment. She has also created and implemented a successful integrated MAT program at DotHouse Health, a Boston-area FQHC and collaborates with the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers to provide TA to health centers who are in the process of establishing or enhancing MAT programs.
    • Dr. Elizabeth Salisbury-Afshar developed the Chicago MAT Learning Collaborative, which brings ten Chicago-based FQHCs together to learn from one another and share best practices. Elizabeth also created and implemented an integrated MAT program at Heartland Health Outreach, a Chicago FQHC that serves people experiencing homelessness and living with HIV.

    Elizabeth M. Salisbury-Afshar

    MD, MPH, FAAFP, FASAM, FACPM

    Elizabeth Salisbury-Afshar, MD, MPH serves as the Medical Director of Behavioral Health for the Chicago Department of Public Health and is an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Family Medicine and Psychiatry, Section of Population and Behavioral Health, at Rush University Medical Center. She is certified in family medicine, addiction medicine and preventive medicine/general public health. Elizabeth previously served as Medical Director of Behavioral Health Systems Baltimore- a quasi-public entity that oversees all publicly funded addiction and mental health treatment in Baltimore City. In this role, she helped develop and implement the Baltimore City Overdose Prevention Plan. Elizabeth came back to Chicago in 2014 and served as Medical Director of Heartland Health Outreach (HHO), a federally qualified health center and healthcare for the homeless provider (330H) in Chicago. While at HHO, she expanded their addiction treatment services and developed a medication assisted treatment program. 

    Elizabeth has been working with the Chicago Department of Public Health since September of 2016 and continues to volunteer seeing patients in the medication assisted treatment program at HHO. In her role with the City Health Department, she guides the Department's work in the area of substance use as it relates to data analysis, policy, programming initiatives, and funding allocation.

    Rachel King

    MD

    Rachel King, MD serves as the Medical Director of Opioid Addiction Treatment Project ECHO at Boston Medical Center, which leverages technology to educate primary care teams around the country about addiction treatment. She also is a primary care physician and the medical director of the OBAT (office based addiction treatment) program at DotHouse Health, a community health center affiliated with Boston Medical Center.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Improving Treatment for Opioid Use Disorders: A System-Wide Approach (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning how to to improve clinical outcomes within treatment systems in which patients with addiction involving opioids receive care, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will enhance your ability to play an active role in improving clinical outcomes within treatment systems in which patients with addictions involving opioids receive care. This is important because evidence-based approaches on municipal, state, and national levels are often not provided in a reliable manner. 

    The speakers, expert in their respective areas, will provide data-based descriptions of specific community-based opioid treatment systems, the problems inherent in their effective operation, and options for improving access to effective care. These talks will be followed by a panel discussion and exchange with the audience to help participants apply this in their own professional work. 

    The four presentations are: 

    1. Dr. Olsen will review data related to a 66% increase in opioid-related overdose fatalities in Maryland. This State has long had a history of innovative approaches to substance use disorders, including changes in Medicaid financing structures and support of peer recovery coaches. She will describe state level policy efforts to expand access and quality of treatment, along with recovery support services, across the continuum of specialty addiction treatment, and in hospital emergency departments. 
    2. Nearly 40% of the population of Los Angeles County is enrolled in California’s MediCal program. Over 400,000 of the county’s residents have a substance use disorder, but only 45,000 currently receive specialty addiction treatment, and only a small portion of them are retained on buprenorphine maintenance. Dr. Hurley will review three parallel efforts in the County for expanding availability of medications for addiction treatment: in general medical and mental health settings; in facilities outside of medical treatment settings, such as the county jail system; and in the specialty addiction treatment sector. 
    3. Dr. Galanter will review findings on 3,450 residential-based “rehabs” in the U.S. that have no hospital affiliation. Less than half of them have a physician on staff, and only 25% offer buprenorphine treatment. This represents a major deficit in the availability of the principal pharmacologic agent available for treatment of opioid use disorders. In order to address this, ways in which physicians in addiction medicine can engage more actively in consultation and in framing policy in such programs and in related organizations will be reviewed. Additionally, approaches needed to expand on consulting and in assuming administrative roles will be discussed. 
    4. By drawing on the U.S. National Survey on Drug Use and Health, Dr. Williams will review data on 2.4 million individuals who have an opioid use disorder. Only 21% of them are in treatment, and only a small portion of these are retained on MAT beyond six months, reflecting a long-standing addiction treatment gap. Means of developing clearly defined stages of engagement, MAT initiation, retention, and recovery for such persons will be reviewed. This entails implementing approaches to effectively directing resources, standardizing data collection, and providing primary endpoints of treatment. These will be spelled out in terms of developing quality measures to be applied for generating improvement in patient outcomes.

    Marc Galanter

    MD, DFASAM

    Marc Galanter, M.D., is a Professor of Psychiatry at NYU, Founding Director of the Division of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse, a Senior Editor of the Journal “Substance Abuse,” and co-editor of the American Psychiatric Association's “Textbook of Substance Abuse Treatment.” He has written four books, “Cults: Faith, Healing, and Coercion,” “Network Therapy for Alcohol and Drug Abuse,” “Spirituality and the Healthy Mind,” and "What is Alcoholics Anonymous?", and published over 200 peer-reviewed articles. His NIH and foundation-funded studies have addressed network therapy for substance abuse, pharmacologic treatment for addiction, the psychology of Twelve-Step recovery, and spirituality in healthcare.

    Dr. Galanter attended Albert Einstein College of Medicine where he did his residency in psychiatry. After that he was a Clinical Associate of the National Institute of Mental Health, then an NIH Career Teacher. He later served as President of the Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA, 1976-1977), the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry (AAAP, 1991-1992), and the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM, 1999-2001). Among his awards are the Gold Achievement Award for Innovation in Clinical Care, the Oskar Pfister Award for Spirituality, Religion and Psychiatry, and the Seymour Vestermark Award for Psychiatric Education, all from the American Psychiatric Association; the McGovern Award for Medical teaching from AMERSA; the Smithers Award for Research form ASAM; and New York State's Award for Psychiatric Research.

    Yngvild K. Olsen

    MD, MPH, FASAM

    Yngvild Olsen, MD, MPH, currently serves as Medical Director of the Institutes for Behavior Resources Inc/REACH Health Services, a comprehensive outpatient addiction treatment center in Baltimore City. In addition, she provides medical consultation to the Maryland Behavioral Health Administration. She completed her medical training at Harvard Medical School, and internal medicine residency with a year as Primary Care Chief Resident at the Boston Medical Center. She received a Master’s in Public Health from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health as part of a fellowship in General Internal Medicine at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. 

    She has previously served as Vice President of Clinical Affairs for the Baltimore Substance Abuse Systems, as Deputy Health Officer for the Harford County Health Department, and as Medical Director for the Johns Hopkins Hospital’s outpatient substance use treatment services. Dr. Olsen is the current ASAM Secretary, following a term as Chair of ASAM's Public Policy Committee.

    Brian Hurley

    MD, MBA, DFASAM

    Dr. Brian Hurley is an addiction psychiatrist and Medical Director for Co-Occurring Disorder Services for the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health (LACDMH), supporting the identification and management of co-occurring substance use among patients with mental illness served by LACDMH. He is an assistant professor of Addiction Medicine at UCLA. 

    Brian serves as the Treasurer and is a Distinguished Fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. Brian joined ASAM in 2002 as a first year medical student, and has served on the ASAM Board of Directors in various capacities since 2003. Brian previously served as chair of ASAM’s Membership Committee and Physicians-in-Training Committee and is formerly ASAM’s alternate delegate to the American Medical Association. Brian additionally served on the EVP/CEO search committee in 2010 that led to Penny Mill’s selection as ASAM’s current EVP/CEO. He has additional served in various roles for the Massachusetts Society of Addiction Medicine, New York Society of Addiction Medicine, and California Society of Addiction Medicine.

    Brian completed the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and was previously a Veterans Administration National Quality Scholar at the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System. He completed residency training at the Massachusetts General Hospital and McLean Hospital, where he was Chief Resident in Addiction Psychiatry and addiction psychiatry fellowship training at Bellevue Hospital and the New York Veterans Administration. Brian is a graduate of the Keck School of Medicine and Marshall School of Business of the University of Southern California. He was a 2012 American College of Psychiatrists Laughlin fellow, a 2010-2013 American Psychiatric Association (APA) Public Psychiatry Fellow, and a 2015-2017 Group for Advancement of Psychiatry Fellow. Brian has previously served on the Board of Trustees of the APA.

    Arthur Robin Williams

    MD, MBE, Assistant Professor

    Arthur Robin Williams, MD, MBE is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry in the Division on Substance Use Disorders, Columbia University Department of Psychiatry and a NIDA funded Research Scientist at the New York State Psychiatric Institute. He completed medical school at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine where he also earned a Master in Bioethics. He completed residency training at NYU Bellevue and an addiction psychiatry fellowship at Columbia. His research on improving the nation's response to the opioid overdose epidemic has been published in the New England Journal of Medicine, Health Affairs, and The American Journal on Addictions and presented to SAMHSA's CSAT Council of Directors.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Motivational Interviewing: Brushing up on the Basics (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning how Motivational Interviewing (or MI), has been transformational in medical care since it's release in 2013, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn about Motivational Interviewing (MI).  Detailed in Miller and Rollnick’s books (1991, 2002, 2013), MI has been transformational in medical care. Despite being released in 2013, the approach and spirit in the third edition has only very slowly made its way into the repertoire of most clinicians. Indeed, the new four process approach does not utilize even some of the most famous principles and skills from prior iterations. 

    The dimensions of the Spirit of MI have been refined and expanded, consisting of partnership, acceptance, compassion, and evocation. In the conversation toward change, MI utilizes four Processes: engaging, focusing, evoking, and planning. MI concepts are easy to understand, but use requires continual practice and skill refinement. This session seeks to build upon familiar concepts in MI and update those with the latest terminology, understanding, uses, and skills in MI using a combination of didactic and interactive large and small group sessions to practice various aspects of the approach.

    Carla Marienfeld

    MD

    Carla Marienfeld, MD, is an addiction psychiatrist and an Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at University of California San Diego. Clinically, she focuses on the treatment of patients with substance use disorders and co-morbid psychiatric conditions. She previously worked at a large outpatient addiction treatment program serving over 5000 patients. Her academic interests focus on implementation research and large-data health outcomes for patients with substance use disorders. She attended Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, TX, where she completed the International Health Track, served nationally on the Board of Trustees of the American Medical Student Association (AMSA), and earned Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) Medical Honors Society and Honors distinction. During psychiatry residency at Yale, she served as chief resident, a National Institute of Drug Abuse R25 Research Fellow, and as the resident representative to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), while also earning several awards and fellowships. She completed a fellowship in Addiction Psychiatry at Yale. During residency and her early faculty years, she founded and led the Yale Global Mental Health Program. She served as the site training director for the Yale New Haven Hospital Addiction Psychiatry Fellowship and supervised and taught medical students for psychiatry, residents for global mental health, and fellows for addiction psychiatry. She has come to UCSD to help in the development and implementation of a new Addiction Recovery and Treatment Program and a new Addiction Psychiatry Fellowship.

    Petros Levounis

    MD, MA, DFASAM

    Dr. Levounis is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Stanford University where he studied chemistry and biophysics before receiving his medical education at Stanford University School of Medicine and the Medical College of Pennsylvania. During medical school, he received an MA degree in sociology from Stanford before moving to New York City where he trained in psychiatry at Columbia University. He graduated from Columbia receiving the National Institute of Mental Health Outstanding Resident Award and went on to complete his fellowship in addiction psychiatry at New York University. From 2002 to 2013, he served as director of the Addiction Institute of New York.
    Dr. Levounis has written numerous articles and monographs; has lectured extensively on addiction topics throughout the United States and abroad; and has been interviewed by all major television networks. Dr. Levounis serves on the Board of Directors of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) and from 2005 to 2009 chaired the national Committee on Addiction Treatment of the American Psychiatric Association. Dr. Levounis is a Betty Ford Scholar, a recipient of a U.S. State Department Speaker and Specialist Award, a distinguished fellow of the APA and ASAM, and an honorary member of the World Psychiatric Association. 

    Dr. Levounis has published thirteen books including the self-help paperback “Sober Siblings: How to Help Your Alcoholic Brother or Sister—and Not Lose Yourself,” the textbook of “Substance Dependence and Co-Occurring Psychiatric Disorders,” “The Behavioral Addictions,” “Motivational Interviewing for Clinical Practice,” “Becoming Mindful,” and the “Office-Based Buprenorphine Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder,” now in its second edition. His books have been translated into German, Hungarian, Japanese, Portuguese, and Spanish. 

    Dr. Levounis is married to actor Lukas Hassel and lives in New York City.

    Natassia Gaznick

    MD PhD

    Natassia Gaznick, MD, PhD, is an NIMH-funded research-track resident in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego. She graduated from Loyola Marymount University where she studied Biology before embarking on a two-year research fellowship at the Mayo Clinic under the NIH-sponsored Postbaccalaureate Research Education Program geared at increasing the number of underrepresented minorities in the sciences. Dr. Gaznick graduated medical school from the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine NIH-funded Medical Scientist Training Program with an MD and PhD. She obtained a PhD in Neuroscience where she focused on the neurobiology of addiction as well as general impulsivity with special interest in the basal ganglia and insula. During that time she was awarded an NIH-sponsored Research Supplement to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research. Her academic interests include integration of psychotherapy into the current climate of psychiatric practice, promotion of underrepresented minorities in medicine and the sciences, wellness, physician mental health, and the neurobiology and treatment of addictions.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Addressing the Opioid Crisis: The Critical Importance of Medical Education (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while exploring strategies for improving the ways in which medical schools prepare future physicians to address pain and addiction, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn about the startling statistics:  Each day, 90 Americans die of an opioid overdose. In 2016, overdose deaths exceeded 59,000 -- the largest annual increase ever recorded in the United States. Opioids thus have become the leading cause of death among Americans under age 50, and two-thirds of the deaths involve a prescription opioid. 

    To address this situation, ASAM and other professional organizations and government agencies have produced high-quality guidelines and continuing medical education programs, which can be extremely valuable to physicians whose formal training predated current research into opioids and the disease of addiction. However, there remains a void in addressing the opioid crisis, and that involves the training of future physicians. 

    To assess the situation, the Coalition On Physician Education in Substance Use Disorders (COPE) is surveying osteopathic and allopathic medical schools across the U.S. The COPE survey contains 13 questions, the first 11 of which ask whether certain subjects are part of the curriculum at the respondent's medical school and, if so, how and when those subjects are taught. The survey also inquires about resource needs, recommended resources, and successful strategies for increasing attention to opioid prescribing and opioid use disorder. 

    To date, completed surveys have been submitted by half of the Nation's 170 medical schools. Their responses suggest an urgent need to increase attention to opioid prescribing practices, as well as the identification and management of patients who are at risk for or experiencing opioid use disorders. For example, only 55% of medical schools report that their curricula include instruction in safe and appropriate prescribing of opioids and other drugs with abuse potential. Further, only 26% of schools say their curricula address identification of older adults who are engaged in risky or non-medical use of prescription or illicit opioids and other drugs, while 64% of curricula address similar issues in the care of adolescents and 49% do so with regard to pregnant women. Overcoming these deficits will involve a sustained effort to provide appropriate resources and adequate support to medical school faculty and administrators, and helping them find local addiction experts through ASAM, AAAP and AOAAM. 

    In the collaborative session proposed here, the presenters and audience will explore the nature and extent of the problem and approaches to addressing it. For example, COPE is working with medical school faculty and other experts to identify, compile, and vet teaching resources, such as definitions of core competencies, online courses and webinars, clinical guidelines, and other educational materials. These will be organized in an online resource center that is available to all medical school faculty at no cost. The resource center will be updated by COPE working groups on a continuing basis so that it is responsive to emerging issues and needs. The presenters proposed for this session bring multiple perspectives to the discussion, including expertise in addiction, medical education, faculty development, and delivery of patient care. They will engage audience members in discussing and prioritizing strategies to improve the content of medical education in this vital area.

    John A. Hopper

    MD, FAAP, FACP, DFASAM

    Dr. Hopper attended Medical School at Wayne State University and completed his residency in Combined Internal Medicine and Pediatrics at the University of North Carolina, where he served as Co-Chief Resident in Pediatrics. Dr. Hopper was appointed to the faculty at Wayne State University School of Medicine in 1994 where he served as Associate Program Director for the Med-Peds Residency and Medical Director of the Department of Psychiatry’s Research Division on Substance Abuse. From 2005 to 2008, he was the Chief Medical Officer at Brighton Hospital, the second oldest addiction treatment hospital in the United States. In addition to his many clinical and teaching awards, Dr. Hopper is an author for many textbook chapters, and serves on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Opioid Management. From 2008 to 2015 Dr. Hopper directed the Internal Medicine Residency Program at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital in Ann Arbor, Michigan, where he continues to serve as a clinical faculty member. In 2013 Dr. Hopper started Michigan’s first American Board of Addiction Medicine approved addiction fellowship, which he directed until 2015. Dr. Hopper currently serves as a Field Reviewer for the Clinical Learning Environment Review Program of the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education."

    Mark L. Kraus

    MD, FASAM

    Mark L. Kraus, MD, FASAM is a General Internist at Franklin Medical Group, in Waterbury, Connecticut, Past Vice President and a Board Member of ASAM, a Distinguished Fellow of the ASAM and a Diplomate of the American Board of Addiction Medicine. Dr. Kraus is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine at Yale University School of Medicine, does clinical research in and teaches Addiction Medicine and General Internal Medicine to Yale and St. Mary’s Hospital Primary Care General Internal Medicine Residents. Dr. Kraus has written numerous articles and chapters about Addiction, and has lectured nationally and internationally on the subject.

    Dr. Kraus was Co-Chairman of the Physician’s Task Force on Education for AMERSA, a member of the steering committee of the Coalition of Physician Education in Substance Use Disorders (COPE), a member of ASAM's Legislative and Finance Committee, Co-Chair of the Patient Advocacy Task Force and Chairman of ASAM's Consensus 42-CFR Action group (AAAP, AOA-AM, AMERSA). He was Co-chair of, and is now, a member of ASAM’s Public Policy Committee.

    Dr. Kraus has been a member of the Primary Care Physician’s Work Group for NIDA, Chairman of ASAM’s Development Committee for Strategic Planning, the Expert Panel of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy for the Addiction Medicine Education Summit meetings, the Connecticut Alcohol and Drug Policy Council and the Connecticut Mental Health Policy Council. He serves as a Mentor in the Physician Clinical Support System for Buprenorphine, Methadone and Medical Assisted Treatment for Opiate Dependence.

    Dr. Kraus is Chairman of the Connecticut State Medical Society’s Addiction Medicine Committee, a founder and past President of ASAM's Connecticut Chapter, former Director of Addiction Medicine at two Hospitals in Waterbury, Connecticut and is currently Chief Medical Officer of Connecticut Counseling Centers, Inc., Danbury, Connecticut."

    Stephen Wyatt

    DO, FASAM

    Stephen Wyatt, D.O, is a Board Certified Psychiatrist with added subspecialty certification in Addiction Psychiatry. He currently serves as the Medical Director of Addiction Medicine for Carolinas HealthCare System, CHS. He is a CHS Professor of Psychiatry and an adjunct clinical faculty member of the University of North Carolina. Dr. Wyatt practiced Emergency Medicine in Michigan for 13 years before entering psychiatry training; finishing in an addiction psychiatry clinical research fellowship at the Yale School of Medicine. He is the current Chairman of the NC Psychiatric Asso. Addiction Psychiatry Committee and the Vice Chair of the Coalition on Physician Education in Substance Use Disorders a national organization focused on addiction medicine medical school education. He participated in the writing of the ASAM Clinical Guidelines for Office Based Opioid Treatment and is a Clinical Expert for the SAMHSA funded Provider Clinical Support System for Medication Assisted Treatment.

    Bonnie B. Wilford

    MS, Executive Vice President

    Bonnie B. Wilford, M.S., is Executive Vice President of the Coalition On Physician Education in Substance Use Disorders (COPE), an organization dedicated to improving the education of all medical students by increasing the attention given to substance abuse and related disorders.  

    Mrs. Wilford began her career at the American Medical Association, where she helped to create a number of collaborative programs, including a national Steering Committee on Prescription Drug Abuse, and authored the AMA’s handbook, Drug Abuse: A Guide for the Primary Care Physician, which sold 50,000 copies worldwide. After serving as Director of the AMA’s Department of Substance Abuse for five years, she was promoted to Director of the AMA’s Division of Clinical Science, leading four departments.

    After a decade at the AMA, Mrs. Wilford joined the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), for which she completed a study of federally-funded medical education programs on substance use disorders and represented ONDCP to a British Ministry of Health initiativeto improve medical education about addiction in U.K. medical schools. She also has managed HHS contracts that developed CME programs and other resources on the treatment of pain and addiction, including 60 live CME courses at sites around the U.S., as well as online courses and other educational resources, such as SAMHSA’s Opioid Overdose Toolkit.

    Mrs. Wilford also has served as a section editor of ASAM’s Principles of Addiction Medicine, managing editor of the ASAM Patient Placement Criteria, and content editor of the forthcoming ASAM Handbook on Pain & Addiction. She also is a frequent contributor to medical journals and UpToDate®. Her work has been recognized with numerous awards, including the AMA’s Distinguished Service Award and ASAM's President’s Award for Lifetime Achievement in Addiction Education.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • SUD Patients and Pain: The Multi-Faceted and Ever Changing Clinical Challenges (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about the frequently encountered issues, as well as the substantial evolution in the management of older challenges, as well as the emergence of new issues in the interface between pain and addiction, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn about and focus on four different topics that are emerging at the interface between addiction and pain management as clinically important and challenging. All addiction physicians are confronted by patients with concomitant pain issues, and pain management programs are often ill equipped to assess and treat patients with possible substance use disorders. One area of addiction medicine practice where problems of pain management often emerge is in the patient on medication assisted treatment (MAT) who has chronic or acute/perioperative pain. 

    This workshop will review the principals of pain management in MAT patient populations and then illustrate their applicability through a series of patient management cases. The gabapentinoids have emerged as a highly controversial family of medications over the past few years. Once a mainstay of chronic pain treatment, and even post a cute withdrawal treatment, these medications are being more and more closely scrutinized from and abuse and addition standpoint. The changing use of gabapentinoids will be explored through case presentation and large group discussion. Men and women have many physiologic and sociologic differences (drug metabolism i.e. zolpidem, likelihood of being prescribed controlled drugs, etc). Emerging differences between men and women when it comes to pain, pain management and addictive disease will be explored. The CDC promulgated national guidelines for the use of opioids in chronic non-malignant pain. These guidelines are primarily applicable to patient without substance use disorders. However, the implications of the guidelines for patients with addictive disease and physicians who care for them are great. The application of CDC Guidelines for pain management and opioids will be reviewed through illustrative case discussion.

    Edwin A. Salsitz

    MD, DFASAM

    Dr. Edwin A. Salsitz has been an attending physician in the Mount Sinai Beth Israel , Division of Chemical Dependency, New York City, since 1983, and is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. He is the principal investigator of the Methadone Medical Maintenance (office-based methadone maintenance) research project. 

    Dr. Salsitz is certified by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM), as well as by the Board of Internal Medicine and Pulmonary Disease. He has published and lectures frequently on addiction medicine topics.Dr. Salsitz is a course director for ASAM sponsored buprenorphine trainings,and is a mentor in the PCSS-MAT mentoring program. He has co-chaired the ASAM Review Course, the ASAM Common Threads Course, the ASAM State of the Art course and is a reviewer for the Journal of Addiction Medicine and Drug and Alcohol Dependence. He is the chair of the ASAM REMS course on safe and effective prescribing of opioids. 

    Dr. Salsitz was the Co-chair of the ASAM CME committee and Chair of the New York Society of Addiction Medicine CME and Education committee. Dr. Salsitz is a member of the medical advisory panel, for the New York State Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services.  Dr. Salsitz is the recipient of the 2014 ASAM Annual Award, and the 2018 ASAM Annual Educator of the Year Award.

    Ted Parran, Jr.

    MD

    Dr. Ted Parran is a 1978 graduate with honors in History from Kenyon College and a 1982 graduate from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. He completed a residency in Internal Medicine at the Baltimore City Hospital of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Following his residency, Dr. Parran was selected to be the Medical Chief Resident. In 1987, he received the Outstanding Faculty Teacher Award from the Department of Medicine. In 1988 he returned to Cleveland and CWRU School of Medicine. 

    Dr. Parran pursues several areas of special interest in medical education including Doctor – Patient Communication, Faculty Development, Continuing Medical Education, and Addiction Medicine. In addition, Dr. Parran is board certified in Internal medicine and Addiction Medicine, and his group practice provides medical directorship services to several Substance Abuse treatment programs in northeast Ohio. He is widely published and has been an invited speaker at national and international conferences for the past two and a half decades. 

    He established the Addiction Fellowship Program at CWRU School of Medicine in 1994, teaches on the Addiction Psychiatry Fellowship faculty and co-directs the current Addiction Medicine Fellowship Program at St. Vincent Charity Hospital. Dr. Parran is the co-director of the Foundations of Clinical Medicine Course, a course with topics which touch on the doctor patient relationship, health disparities, professionalism, cultural competence and health policy. He is the medical director of the Program in Continuing Medical Education, and in 2007 was named as the inaugural Isabel and Carter Wang Professor and Chair in Medical Education, all at CWRU School of Medicine. 

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.