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  • Improving Medical Education In Substance Use Disorders (1 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning screening, brief Interventions, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) training​ from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    Despite significant physical, mental and social impairments associated with SUDs, only about 10% of people needing treatment for SUDs receive the help they need. This shortfall is perpetuated by physicians feeling unprepared to make the SUD diagnosis, as well as being unfamiliar with next steps to take once the SUD is identified. Furthermore, many providers do not prefer working with individuals with SUD and pass along negative perceptions to trainees. For example, attitudes of medical trainees farther along in training have been found to be more negative toward individuals with alcohol use disorder than those of first-year medical students, presumably in part due to witnessing stigmatizing behaviors of senior colleagues.  While medication-assisted treatment programs and harm reduction approaches are recently receiving much national attention, there is relatively little focus on improving medical training on SUDs. Curricula lack sufficient instruction and experiences in addiction medicine spanning the continuum of medical education, from medical school through residency and fellowship training programs. Programs that have successfully changed students’ attitudes and skills for treatment of addicted patients continue to be exceptional and limited in focus rather than the general practice in U.S. medical schools.  Several barriers add to the lack of training efforts, including physician attitudes, societal stigma, and skill deficits.  Despite such barriers, however, effective methods exist for incorporating SUD training into each level medical training. Such training may occur in a variety of formats, ranging from online to experiential, and individually to classroom-based. This session will describe recent efforts in providing Screening, Brief Interventions, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) training to all medical students, offering buprenorphine training to residents, using standardized patients and interactive sessions to learn and practice Motivational Interviewing skills, and other efforts to provide effective and sustainable SUD education to medical trainees. In addition, we will address skillful methods for addressing provider bias and societal stigma regarding SUD at different levels of medical training. We will invite interactive discussion regarding educational modules and interventions that can be implemented into different levels of medical training curricula, with the goal of creating enduring training opportunities and curricula in each stage of medical education and ensuring a future in which physicians are competent and compassionate in caring for patients with SUD.  

    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Understand existing barriers on educating medical trainees about substance use disorders (SUD). 
    2.) Describe structured methods for incorporating SUD training along the continuum of medical education, including medical schools, residencies, fellowships, and faculty development programs. 
    3.) Identify common misperceptions about SUD and discuss methods for addressing stigma in medical education programs.   


    Thersilla Oberbarnscheidt

    MD PhD

    Thersilla Oberbarnscheidt is a current Fellow at the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic at the University of Pittsburgh. She completed her residency at Central Michigan University in Psychiatry and her graduated Medical School from the Christian-Albrechts University in Germany as well as Yale University School of Medicine, USA.  She achieved her PhD in neuroscience with "cum laude" at the Christian-Albrechts University with the thesis  "The effect of phenazone in the acute migraine attack". Her medical background is Internal Medicine in her home country Germany as well as Pain Management. In the US she is a ABPN certified Psychiatrist, currently specilizing in Addiction Psychiatry. Thersilla has a long-standing interest in the field of Addiction and has published numerous articles in the field as well as presented nationally and internationally. Her particular interest is in Marijuana and Opioids.

    Priyanka Amin

    MD

    Priyanka Amin, MD, is a PGY4 psychiatry resident at UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital. She is currently the Chief Resident for Well-Being Initiatives. After graduation, she will be working as the inpatient attending at the Behavioral Health Intensive Care Unit as well as the psychiatric emergency department at UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital. She completed undergraduate at Duke University and medical school at the University of Pittsburgh. 

    Jody B. Glance

    MD

    Jody Glance, MD is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. She is the Medical Director of Addiction Medicine Services at Western Psychiatric Hospital of UPMC and is a Fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. She serves as the Associate Director of Medical Student Education for the Department of Psychiatry and is involved in many community efforts to educate the public about substance use disorders. Her academic and clinical interests include co-occurring substance use and psychiatric disorders, substance use disorders in pregnancy, and women’s mental health.

    Jin Cheng

    MD

    Jin Cheng MD, Im currently a addiction psychiatry fellow at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center , Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic. I graduated from Lousiana health science center Shreveport with my medical degree. I've served as the chief resident for the combined family medicine and psychiatry residency at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. 

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • The Inherited Patient on Sedatives: What to Do Next (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about the risks of sedatives and their management in complex patients from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    Introduction: In the shadows of the opioid epidemic lurks the overprescribing and misuse of benzodiazepines and other sedatives. Since the 1960s, benzodiazepines have been cyclically abused. However, from 1996 to 2013, benzodiazepine prescriptions increased by 67%, and overdose deaths involving benzodiazepines increased from 1,135 in 1999 to 8,791 in 2015 (1). Despite these statistics, benzodiazepines and other sedatives continue to be dispensed at an alarming rate. Medicaid expenditures for benzodiazepines increased by almost forty million dollars in a span of 18 years. As a result, many clinicians now face an all-too-common dilemma of inheriting patients who have been prescribed high-dose benzodiazepines and/or other sedatives for a significant length of time. This is a challenge both medically and therapeutically as many patients have co-morbid psychiatric and medical issues, such as anxiety, insomnia, or chronic pain, which may preclude the clinician from quickly switching their medication regimen. Moreover, patients often become attached to their benzodiazepines and are reluctant to change. It is imperative, with the ongoing opioid epidemic, that clinicians are prepared to effectively evaluate and manage patients who are prescribed sedatives. This session will help educate attendees on the risks of sedatives and their management in complex patients.  Session description: This workshop session will begin with a presentation on benzodiazepines that will cover their indications, risk factors for misuse, signs of intoxication and withdrawal, and clinical pearls on how to effectively treat these patients in an outpatient setting. The presentation will be evidence-based and draw from existing medical literature, and it will also include the presenters’ clinical experience with complicated patients. The emphasis will be on clinical issues, such as developing rapport, monitoring benzodiazepine use, recognizing benzodiazepine intoxication and withdrawal, triaging to appropriate level of care, and treating related medical and psychiatric complications. The presenters are experienced clinicians who have been involved in assessing and treating patients with sedative hypnotic use disorders. The presents have also published about benzodiazepines in peer-reviewed journals. After the initial presentation, the presenters will divide the attendees into separate groups. Each group will be assigned a specific case involving sedative misuse reflecting common challenging clinical scenarios. Groups will discuss their case and develop a cohesive treatment plan, which they will then briefly present. Time will be allotted at the end of the workshop for attendees’ questions.  Conclusions: This workshop will provide attendees with evidence-based clinical knowledge to help guide their evaluation and treatment of complex patients with benzodiazepine misuse.  


    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Describe the risks of benzodiazepines and other sedatives.
    2.) Determine how to appropriately and safely prescribe and monitor benzodiazepines and other sedative use.
    3.) Understand how to screen, evaluate, and manage patients suspected of overusing benzodiazepines and other sedatives. 


    Austin Lin

    MD

    Austin Lin, MD is a board-certified Adult and Addiction Psychiatrist. He attended Washington University in St. Louis where he majored in biology and psychology. He then did breast oncology research at Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine before embarking on to St. George's University School of Medicine. He then attended Harvard South Shore for psychiatry residency, an affiliate program of Harvard Medical School. This was followed by his Addiction Psychiatry fellowship at UT Southwestern Medical Center. He is now the interim adult director for the Trauma and Resilience Center and addiction psychiatrist for the Innovations Clinic at UTHealth. 

    Michael F. Weaver

    MD, DFASAM

    Dr. Michael Weaver is Professor of Psychiatry and Medical Director of the Center for Neurobehavioral Research on Addiction at The University of Texas McGovern Medical School at Houston. He completed a Residency in Internal Medicine and a Clinical Research Fellowship in Addiction Medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University. He is involved in patient care, medical education, and research. Dr. Weaver has multiple publications in the field of addiction medicine. He treats patients at the Innovations Addiction Treatment Clinic at the Texas Medical Center in Houston, which provides medication-assisted treatment. He is the Sub-Board Chair for Addiction Medicine for the American Board of Preventive Medicine.  He is a member of the ASAM Publications Council and on the Editorial Board for the Journal of Addiction Medicine.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Treatment and Law Enforcement: A Collaborative Approach to Combat the Opioid Epidemic (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about strategies for generating solutions to challenges to collaboration across different sectors from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn about strategies for generating solutions to challenges to collaboration across different sectors. In order to address the growing opioid epidemic in Tucson, Arizona, community stakeholders, including healthcare professionals and law enforcement, created an innovative approach to introduce opioid users to medication assisted treatment. A strategic, coordinated response to connect opioid users to appropriate, evidence-based treatment and services was developed in attempt to reduce the harmful effects of opioid use, such as overdose and blood borne pathogen exposure.  This presentation will discuss the Opioid Deflection/Angel program implemented in Pima County, Arizona. Workshop presenters will discuss the impetus for the Deflection/Angel program and the partnerships necessary for its implementation and evaluation. Presenters will also describe program effectiveness in terms of identification of people with opioid and other substance use problems, linkages to appropriate evidence-based treatment, retention in treatment, and improvements in substance use-related outcomes. Presenters will then describe the step-by-step process involved in the development and implementation of the Deflection/Angel program, including: 1) identifying and connecting key decision-makers; 2) developing partnerships; 3) developing program components; 4) creating implementation procedures; 5) obtaining buy-in from key stakeholders; 6) developing a monitoring and evaluation plan; and 6) obtaining funding. Workshop presenters will teach attendees strategies for generating potential solutions to common challenges and barriers to collaboration across different sectors, such as law enforcement and clinical treatment. Presenters will give particular attention to generating solutions informed by best practices, research, and/or regional data.  


    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Upon completion, participant will be able to understand challenges and possible solutions to creating collaborative partnerships and facilitating cultural shifts in community and law enforcement response to substance use.
    2.) Upon completion, participant will be able to discuss the community relationships between health care providers and law enforcement as they relate to supported response to the opioid epidemic. 
    3.) Upon completion, participant will be able to apply informed strategies within their own community to address the challenges of collaboration across multiple sectors.


    Larry Onate

    MD

    Dr. Onate completed his undergraduate degree and medical degree at the University of Arizona.  He completed his Internship at the University of California San Francisco.  He went on to complete his residency in psychiatry at the University of Arizona in 1993.  He was awarded the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Charter Fellowship in 1991.  Dr. Onate’s work experience includes serving as medical director at the following agencies:  Cottonwood de Tucson, 2010-2017; Southern Arizona Mental Health Corporation Crisis Center, 2000-2010; La Frontera, Inc., 1996-2000; and Desert Hills Center for Family and Youth-Adolescent Inpatient Unit, 1993-1996.  Dr. Onate has served as Medical Director of CODAC MAT 24/7 since 2017.  

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Finding Your Path: Addiction Medicine Career Development (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about options for the Addiction Medicine Professional through case presentations and discussion from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    After many years of diligent work by ASAM professionals, Addiction Medicine was recognized by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) in 2015. The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM), a Member Board of ABMS, sponsored the application for the subspecialty to allow physicians certified by any of the 24 ABMS Member Boards to apply for the new certificate. The first Addiction Medicine Board Certification examination took place in 2017. From 2017 until 2022, physicians will be eligible to certify via either a practice pathway or by completion of a recognized Addiction Medicine fellowship. After 2022, the successful candidate for Board Certification in Addiction Medicine will be required to be fellowship trained. This workshop session will explore career opportunities available to the Addiction Medicine provider. The workshop presenters comprise the 2019 Physicians-In-Training Committee (P-I-T) of ASAM.  The workshop participants will illustrate various practice options for the Addiction Medicine Professional through case presentations and interactive discussion between presenters and participants. The role of the physician within each of the ASAM levels of care will be highlighted. Both currently available practice options and possible future options will be explored.



    Joseph M. Garbely

    DO, DFASAM

    As Vice President of Medical Services and Medical Director at Caron Treatment Centers, Dr. Garbely oversees the following programs and departments: Detoxification Unit, Healthcare Professionals’ Unit, Chronic Pain Program, Pilots' Program, Medical Management, Neurocognitive Services, Psychology, Research, and Spiritual Care. Dr. Garbely received his board certifications through the American Board of Internal Medicine, the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, and the American Board of Addiction Medicine. During his tenure at Caron, Dr. Garbely spearheaded a high-level initiative to educate and train physicians in Addiction Medicine through the establishment of the Resident Training Program at Caron Pennsylvania. Dr. Garbely established an American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited Addiction Medicine Fellowship Program at Caron Pennsylvania. As the Addiction Medicine Fellowship Director, Dr. Garbely is a member of the American College of Academic Addiction Medicine. Dr. Garbely is the Chairman of the Physician in Training Committee of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), an ex-officio member of the ASAM Board, and a distinguished Fellow of ASAM. Dr. Garbely is a Clinical Associate Professor at Penn State College of Medicine, an Adjunct Associate Professor at Stony Brook School of Medicine, and a member of the medical staff at Reading Hospital. Prior to this, Dr. Garbely served as the Associate Medical Director at Caron Pennsylvania. With 20 years of Addiction Medicine experience, Dr. Garbely has an extensive background in treating substance use disorders, including substance use disorders in healthcare professionals, executives, and pilots. He has worked to develop treatment programs for psychiatric patients involving a 12-Step philosophy.  Dr. Garbely has won teaching awards on the local and national level, including the American Psychiatric Association’s Helen Ruske, MD Award for Excellence in Medical Student Teaching.

    Alma Ramic

    MD

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • First 1000 Days: Transforming Substance Use Disorder Care for the Growing Family (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about clinical models of care for pregnant and parenting women with SUD from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:


    For many women with substance use disorder (SUD), pregnancy can be a motivating time to reduce use of substances and engage in treatment. Following delivery however, relapse is common and rates of overdose in the first postpartum year are higher than during pregnancy. Possible explanations for the rise in overdose post-delivery include loss of access to specialized programming available only during pregnancy, fragmented transitions of care from prenatal to postpartum providers, women discontinuing medication therapy for opioid use disorder after delivery, high rates of postpartum depression and underlying psychiatric disorders, homelessness, lack of social supports, and the stresses of either caring for a new baby or being separated from one’s baby. To address the concerning rise in substance use and overdose among pregnant and postpartum women, Massachusetts General Hospital’s Substance Use Disorder Initiative received pilot funding from the Medicaid Accountable Care Organization in September 2017 to develop a novel clinical model of care for pregnant and parenting women with SUD. The model focused on developing a family-based model of clinical care in which the health of the family unit is central and where pregnancy care seamlessly transitions into postpartum care with the same dedicated multidisciplinary team that has cared for the mother throughout her pregnancy. Designing and implementing this model required engaging stakeholders from across the institution and re-structuring the existing siloed models of care to bring together a leadership team, advisory team, and clinical team that included Obstetrics, Midwifery, Addiction Medicine, Family Medicine, Pediatrics, Social Work, and Psychiatry. During a six-month intensive planning period, we established a novel, co-located, multidisciplinary clinical program where we care for pregnant, postpartum, and parenting women with SUD, their partners, and their infants from conception of pregnancy through early childhood, up to two years of age, or the first 1000 days of life. The HOPE Clinic officially opened April 2018, offering integrated medical and behavioral care including: prenatal care, high-risk obstetrics, office-based addiction treatment, pediatric and adult primary care, perinatal psychiatry, family planning, evidence-based therapy, peer-based and group recovery support, and nursing in a single integrated clinical setting. In this focus session we will highlight the design and development of this novel multidisciplinary perinatal substance use clinic. First, we will discuss key facilitators and barriers to implementation to aid others interested in creating a similar program. Second, we will present the characteristics of clinic participants during our first pilot year. Finally, we will present several case-based and interactive scenarios to discuss the challenges and strengths of providing family-centered co-located care during this vulnerable period.

    Learning Objectives: 

    1.) Recognize trends in overdose rates in the prenatal and postpartum period
    2.) Describe one strategy for engaging key stakeholders in the process of program development
    3.) Demonstrate a collaborative approach to improving care for families affected by substance use disorder 


    Jessica Gray

    MD

    Dr. Jessica Gray is a family medicine physician and addiction specialist in the departments of Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Pediatrics in Massachusetts General Hospital for Children (MGHfC). She is associate program director for the MGH Addiction Medicine Fellowship and Clinical Director of the HOPE Clinic at MGH, where she cares for women with substance use disorders and their families from time of conception through the first two years postpartum.  She also sees patients at the MGH Bridge Clinic and is a consultant with the Massachusetts Consultation Service for Treatment of Addiction and Pain (MCSTAP) team, which provides support for primary care providers treating patients with chronic pain and/or substance use disorder.  Prior to coming to MGH Dr. Gray completed her family medicine residency and addiction medicine fellowship at Boston Medical Center and worked as a primary care doctor at a federally qualified health center in Dorchester, Massachusetts. 

    Davida Schiff

    MD, MSc

    Dr. Schiff is a general academic pediatrician and health services researcher focused on understanding how substance use in pregnant and parenting women impacts the health of children and families. She is the Medical Director of the HOPE Clinic (Harnessing support for Opioid and substance use disorder in Pregnancy and Early childhood) at Massachusetts General Hospital, a multidisciplinary program caring for women and families with substance use disorder from the time of conception through the first two years postpartum. Dr. Schiff completed her undergraduate training at Columbia University, medical training at the Boston University School of Medicine, pediatrics residency in the Boston Combined Residency Program at Boston Medical Center and Boston Children’s Hospital, general pediatrics research fellowship at Boston Medical Center, and master’s program in health services research from the Boston University School of Public Health. Her research is focused on improving care for families affected by substance use and her past scholarship has been published in the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, Pediatrics, Academic Pediatrics, JSAT, and Substance Abuse, among other journals. She is an Instructor in Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School.


    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Problem Drinking Among Medically Underserved Women: New Horizons in Treatment (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about best approaches to improving access to care and delivering alcohol treatment tailored to medically underserved women from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    Among those with alcohol use disorders, women are less likely to obtain treatment, more likely to present with comorbid conditions, and remain in treatment for shorter durations than men. Furthermore, race and ethnicity may  exacerbate gender disparities. For example, by some estimates both Black and Hispanic women have approximately one-quarter the odds of obtaining alcohol services as White women.  This symposium will address best approaches to improving access to care and delivering alcohol treatment tailored to the social needs and cultural influences of three groups of medically underserved women:  1) American Indian and Alaska Native women; 2) African American women; and 3) Hispanic American women.  In addition to providing an overview of risk factors, prevalence, and trends in problem drinking among these groups of women, the session will include an overview of promising programs designed to meet some of their unique treatment needs.  Specific teaching objectives include:  1) to review the latest findings regarding the prevalence and trends in problem drinking among American Indian and Alaska Native women, African American women, and Hispanic American women, and to highlight most salient risk factors for problem drinking in these groups; 2) to identify some of the unique barriers to treatment access among these women and effective approaches to overcoming those barriers; 3) to examine at least one promising treatment program for each group, highlighting treatment elements that are designed to address the unique needs of that group.  Discuss the strengths and limitations of these programs; barriers and possible solutions to implementation and dissemination challenges; 4) to identify gaps in the literature regarding treatment for these groups and recommend most promising directions for future research; and 5) briefly describe ongoing efforts to address the underrepresentation of women from these groups in the alcohol research enterprise and strategies to address this issue.  


    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Summarize latest findings regarding the prevalence and trends in problem drinking among American Indian and Alaska Native women, African American women, and Hispanic American women.  Identify unique risk factors for these groups.
    2.) Identify some of the unique barriers to treatment access among American Indian and Alaska Native women, African American women, and Hispanic American women and effective approaches to overcoming those barriers.
    3.) Describe at least one promising treatment program for each group, highlighting treatment elements that are designed to address the unique needs of that group.  Discuss barriers and possible solutions to implementation challenges;


    Deidra Y. Roach

    MD

    Dr. Roach has more than 30 years of experience in the field of addiction treatment. She currently serves as a Program Director for the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism where, among other responsibilities, she manages research portfolios addressing the treatment of co-occurring mental health and alcohol use disorders and alcohol-related HIV/AIDS among women. She also serves on the Interagency Coordinating Committee on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (ICCFASD) and the NIH Coordinating Committee for Research on Women’s Health. Dr. Roach chairs the Women Drinking, and Pregnancy Work Group of the ICCFASD.

    Dedra Buchwald

    MD

    Dedra Buchwald, MD is a Professor of Medicine in the Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine at Washington State University where she directs the Initiative for Research and Education to Advance Community Health. She is also the founding director of the Partnerships for Native Health, one of the largest research programs on American Indian and Alaska Native health in the nation. This program has worked with over 150 tribal partners and 35 scientists from a wide range of disciplines. New programmatic emphases include rural, Latino, and Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander populations. Dr. Buchwald has a broad background in public health, population science, and primary care, with special emphases on cultural competence. Her work considers health at the level of the individual, the community, and the health system, using an array of quantitative and qualitative methods. Dr. Buchwald has been the Principal Investigator or Co-Principal Investigator of more than 30 projects funded by NIH and other major organizations and mentored over 50 junior faculty members from diverse backgrounds. 

    Anika Alvanzo

    MD, MS, FASAM, FACP

    Anika Alvanzo, MD, MS is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine where she is also the Medical Director of the Johns Hopkins Hospital Substance Use Disorders Consultation Service (SUDS). Dr. Alvanzo is a graduate of the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences and holds a master's degree in biostatistics from Virginia Commonwealth University. She is board certified in both Internal Medicine and Addiction Medicine. As the Director of the SUDS, Dr. Alvanzo oversees a multidisciplinary consultation service that performs brief behavioral interventions and counseling for hospitalized patients, facilitates linkage to hospital and community-based alcohol and drug treatment programs, provides guidance on the clinical management of substance withdrawal syndromes, and educates patients, families, healthcare professionals and the community to prevent, identify, and treat persons living with addiction. Dr. Alvanzo is also the Director of the Substance Use Disorders Rotation for the Johns Hopkins Medicine-Pediatrics Urban Health and Urban Health Primary Care Residency track programs. Her research interests include gender and race/ethnicity differences in the risk for substance use disorders, integration of technology for screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment in diverse settings and the association between psychological trauma, traumatic stress, and substance use. In particular, she is interested in the mechanisms by which histories of physical and/or sexual violence confer increased risk for substance use disorders and in the development of interventions for co-occurring traumatic stress and substance misuse in women.

    Christina S. Lee

    PhD

    Christina Lee, PhD, is a licensed psychologist whose programmatic research utilizes and disseminates behavioral treatments for substance use to under-served and marginalized populations, with the mission of reducing health inequities related to poor mental and physical health. Dr. Lee’s expertise bridges the areas of intervention science, addiction psychology and health disparities research.  Her primary research studies, funded by NIH, are: (1) developing and testing adapted evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for alcohol and substance use among racial/ethnic minority populations, (2) investigating social determinants of substance use behaviors among marginalized populations, (3) investigating mechanisms of change and psychological processes underlying addiction and its treatment, and (4) using interdisciplinary and multi-level models to implement and disseminate EBTs for substance use (alcohol, opioids).  Dr. Lee received a NIH National Research Service Award (NRSA) as a PhD student, and completed a NIH funded post-doctoral fellowship at the Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies at Brown University. Dr. Lee is on the editorial boards of the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology and of Cultural Diversity: Ethnic and Minority Psychology. In 2013, Dr. Lee received the Kenerson Faculty Scholarship Award at Northeastern for her interdisciplinary research and community service, where she co-established an integrated primary care practice at the South End Community Health Center in Boston, where she currently consults to the Suboxone Support Program. In 2015, she was selected as a NIH Fellow in Randomized Behavioral Clinical Trials (NHLBI). She has been a MINT (Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers) member since 2006 and is certified in Dialectical Behavior Therapy. 

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Reducing Prevalence of Addiction Begins with Youth Prevention: One Choice for Health (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about the RyeACT: a model for how a health-oriented prevention message can impact youth, families and local communities from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    Nearly all adults with substance use disorders began using addictive substances as teens, most commonly with alcohol, nicotine and marijuana. The adolescent brain is hardwired for risk-taking putting teens at the highest risk for problems related to substance use including addiction. Reducing the risk of future substance use problems, including addiction, begins with prevention of youth drug use. Physicians caring for young patients are in a uniquely important position to provide health-focused drug prevention messages both to youth and to their families, including the recommendations laid out by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) for screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) with the health goal of no use of any substance by youth under 21. This workshop presents data from two major national surveys of teen substance use behaviors and it involves the audience in a discussion of how physicians can engage directly with youth to address the public health crisis posed by substance use and addiction. These data show youth drug use (and non-use) are closely related and that the percentage of youth making the decision not to use any drug has been steadily increasing for nearly four decades. In 2015 26% of American high school students had never used any alcohol, cigarettes, marijuana or other drugs in their lifetimes and 51% had not used any in the prior 30 days. Supported by these data, this workshop will present a straightforward and clear prevention message for youth under age 21. One Choice: Do not use any alcohol, nicotine, marijuana or other drugs for reasons of health. This workshop will highlight the experience of RyeACT, a coalition that has comprehensively integrated the One Choice prevention message into the local community. RyeACT is a model for how a health-oriented prevention message can impact youth, families and local communities. The role of physicians treating teens and young adults in integrating this message will be emphasized.


    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Articulate the brain science of the vulnerability of the adolescent brain to substance use. 
    2.) Describe how the One Choice message fits into the SBIRT recommendations of the American Academy of Pediatrics.
    3.) Apply the experiences of the RyeACT Coalition with the One Choice to medicine and integrate into future physician interactions with young patients and their families.


    Caroline DuPont

    MD

    Caroline DuPont, MD is Vice President of the non-profit Institute for Behavior and Health. In this role she focuses on the areas of addiction treatment and prevention. Dr. DuPont maintains a private practice specializing in anxiety and addiction. She received her MD from the University of Texas Health Sciences Center, Houston and completed her training at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, where for years she held an appointment on the clinical faculty of psychiatry. She is board certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and by the American Board of Addiction Medicine. As President and Principal Investigator of DuPont Clinical Research, she directed a team of researchers that conducted studies of investigational medication for the anxiety and affective disorders. She is the co-author of numerous publications and several books on anxiety and addiction.

    Robert L. DuPont

    MD, DFASAM

    For more than 40 years, Robert L. DuPont, M.D. has been a leader in drug abuse prevention and treatment. He served as the first Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (1973-1978) and as the second White House Drug Chief (1973-1977). From 1968-1970 he was Director of Community Services for the District of Columbia Department of Corrections, heading parole and half-way house services. From 1970-1973, he served as Administrator of the District of Columbia Narcotics Treatment Administration. Following this distinguished public career, in 1978 Dr. DuPont became the founding president of the Institute for Behavior and Health, Inc., a non-profit organization that identifies and promotes new ideas to reduce illegal drug use. He has been Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the Georgetown University School of Medicine since 1980. 

    A graduate of Emory University, Dr. DuPont received an M.D. degree in 1963 from the Harvard Medical School. He completed his psychiatric training at Harvard and the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. 

    Dr. DuPont is a Life Fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. His activities in ASAM include chairing the forensic science committee from 1995 to 2004, and serving as Co-Chair of the two White Paper writing committees that produced The Role of the Physician in “Medical” Marijuana in 2010 and State-Level Proposals to Legalize Marijuana in 2012. He served as Chair of the writing committee that produced Drug Testing: A White Paper of the American Society of Addiction Medicine in 2013. He is also a Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and was chairman of the Drug Dependence Section of the World Psychiatric Association from 1974 to 1979. In 1989 he became a founding member of the Medical Review Officer Committee of ASAM."

    Nancy Pasquale

    Nancy Pasquale is the Co-founder and Coalition Coordinator of RyeACT, a substance abuse prevention coalition in Rye, New York. Ms. Pasquale's professional background is in human resources development/curriculum design. She spent a decade  volunteering in the Rye schools. As a PTO Co-President, Ms. Pasquale sourced and organized cultural and academic enrichment activities and advocated on educational policy at the local and state level. She spent three years as Co-President of the Friends of the Rye City School District and was recognized for her leadership in mobilizing voters to pass a $17M facilities bond. Ms. Pasquale served two three-year terms as an elected Trustee of the Rye City School District Board of Education. As Trustee, she chaired or served on committees including: Curriculum Council, Professional Development, Facilities, Policy, and Health and Safety. Drawing on insight she gained through years of community service to youth, Ms. Pasquale co-founded RyeACT in 2014 and built the organization’s infrastructure. Leveraging her deep connection to the community, she garnered support for the coalition’s mission and that connection continues to motivate and inform Ms. Pasquale’s work. In 2016, she co-authored the grant proposal that secured $625,000 in federal funding through the Drug Free Communities program of the ONDCP. As Coalition Coordinator, Ms. Pasquale oversees all programmatic aspects of the Coalition. She serves as Co-Adviser of the RyeACT Youth Action Team, working directly with youth leaders on peer-to-peer initiatives. Under Ms. Pasquale’s stewardship, RyeACT has been recognized for exemplary leadership in youth  prevention.  The coalition was one of seventeen to be admitted to the national pilot cohort of CADCA’s Graduate Coalition Academy and Ms. Pasquale has presented at CADCA’s National Leadership Forum (2017,2018,2019). She is pleased to join the Institute of Behavior and Health to present at the American Society of Addiction Medicine conference (April, 2019). 

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Policy Plenary Session (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about approaches taken by state Medicaid programs to combat the opioid overdose crisis from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    State Medicaid programs play a vital role in financing and facilitating access to treatment for substance use disorder for individuals with limited income and resources. In 2014 alone, the federal/state insurance program financed over 20% of all addiction treatment. Across the country, states have worked to transform their Medicaid programs as a response to changes in federal and state laws, and new funding and waiver opportunities. This plenary session will explore a cross section of approaches taken by state Medicaid programs to equip attendees with an understanding of the intersection between state, federal, and insurance policies used to combat the opioid overdose crisis.




    Beth Kidder

    MPP

    Ms. Kidder is the Deputy Secretary for Medicaid at Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration. She has served in state Medicaid programs for twenty years and has led Florida’s Medicaid program since 2017. Florida Medicaid provides health and long-term care services to almost four million low income Floridians primarily through a managed care delivery system. Ms. Kidder was instrumental in transforming the state’s Medicaid program to a managed care model and reorganizing the state’s business processes to support this change. Her expertise is in managed care, long-term care services, coverage policies, quality improvement, and organizational development. Ms. Kidder holds a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Florida and a Master of Public Policy from Duke University.  

    Jennifer S. Lee

    MD

    Jennifer Lee, MD, serves as the Director of the Department of Medical Assistance Services, the Virginia state Medicaid agency, responsible for overseeing a $10 billion budget and providing health coverage for over 1 million Virginians. Previously she served as Deputy under Secretary for Health for Policy and Services and Senior Advisor to the Secretary at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. There she was responsible for overseeing national policy and leading key initiatives for the Nation’s largest integrated health care system, with over 1,200 sites of care serving more than nine million veterans. From 2014-16, Dr. Lee served as Deputy Secretary of Health and Human Resources for Governor Terry McAuliffe. She helped launch his “A Healthy Virginia” plan to improve access to care for people with mental illness and address the opioid crisis through innovative Medicaid waivers and programs, led the Governor’s bioscience initiative, and spearheaded new employment opportunities for former combat medics and corpsmen. From 2008-11, she served on the Virginia Board of Medicine. Dr. Lee has also served as a White House Fellow, a health policy fellow on the U.S. Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, and a Policy Research Scholar and Associate Professor at George Washington University. She received her bachelor’s in biophysics and biochemistry from Yale University, her medical degree from Washington University School of Medicine, and completed her residency at Johns Hopkins. She is a board-certified, practicing emergency physician and a fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians. 

    Kimberly Brandt

    JD, MA

    Kimberly Brandt is the Principal Deputy Administrator at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Leading and Presenting to Large Group Audiences (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning how to develop effective interactive and collaborative teaching skills from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    The faculty in this interactive session will present brief “tips” on leading and teaching to large groups, through brief didactic presentations, each of which will be followed by group discussion and an opportunity for participants to ask questions.  The topics will focus on developing effective interactive and collaborative teaching skills, including creating an interactive learning environment, leading large group discussions, gaining and maintaining audience attention through effective presentation style and slides, incorporating audio-visual examples into presentations, and managing group dynamics.  The session format will allow the faculty to model these same tips in action.  Special attention will be given to the use of case-based learning strategies, adapting presentations for diverse audiences, the use of reflection and audience-polling strategies to encourage interaction.  Participants will have opportunities to ask questions of the faculty during the session.  The session will conclude with a review of how the session presented the tips in action.  

    Learning Objectives: 

    1.) Lead large group discussions using case-based learning strategies and visual stimuli as examples
    2.) Engage audiences in active participation through  strategies such as polling, pair and share, and reflection
    3.) Adapt presentation strategies to diverse inter-professional audiences


    Peter Selby

    MBBS, CCFP, FCFP, DFASAM

    Peter Selby MD is the Director of Medical Education and a Clinician Scientist at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. He is a Professor in the Departments of Family and Community Medicine, Psychiatry, and the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto. He is also a Clinician Scientist in the Department of Family and Community Medicine. Dr. Selby is the Executive Director and creator of the TEACH project; a continuing education certificate program in Applied Counselling for Health with a focus on smoking cessation, through the University of Toronto. Dr. Selby’s research, as a Principal Investigator at the Ontario Tobacco Research Unit, includes smoking cessation especially in smokers with co-morbid conditions. As the Principal Investigator of the STOP Study, he investigates the effectiveness of NRT and counselling in different types of intervention settings. He is also the PI of CANADAPTT- a unique Canadian Smoking Cessation Guideline development and dissemination project. Dr. Selby also continues his clinical research with pregnant women who use substances and is the PI of a knowledge translation program (PREGNETS) to increase the adoption of evidence-based interventions with pregnant smokers. 

    He has received grant funding totaling over 80 million dollars from CIHR, NIH, and Ministry of Health and has published 130 peer reviewed publications. He has published 5 books (including 4 edited), is the author of 30 book chapters, and 32 research reports prepared for the government. He is the Co-Chair for the Ministry of Health Cessation Task force and the Chair of the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse National Task Force on Treatment for Prescription Drug Misuse. Dr. Selby mentors Fellows in Addiction Medicine and Addiction Psychiatry, junior investigators and medical students. Dr. Selby a sought after speaker for various topics including addictive disorders, motivational interviewing, and health behavior change.

    Miriam Komaromy

    , MD, FACP,DFASAM

    Dr. Miriam Komaromy is a physician and professor of medicine at the University of New Mexico in the United States.  She is board certified in Internal Medicine and Addiction Medicine.  She has been an Associate Director in the ECHO Institute, leading ECHO programs that are focused on treatment of substance use disorders for the past 13 years.  She consults with programs around the world on implementation of the ECHO model to expand access to specialized medical care, and particularly focuses on ECHO for addictions, mental health, care of complex populations, and ECHO programs to support community health workers. Dr. Komaromy provides clinical consultation and outpatient care for patients with complex substance use disorders.  She has served as Medical Director for New Mexico’s addiction treatment hospital, and led the development of the state’s guidelines for treatment of opioid use disorder.  Dr. Komaromy is a member of the board of directors of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), which is the largest addiction-specialty society in the United States.  She is vice-chair of ASAM’s national medical education committee, and she chairs their Fundamentals of addiction medicine committee.  She was recently elected ASAM educator of the year for 2019.  Dr. Komaromy lectures nationally and internationally on addiction medicine topics, including treatment of opioid use disorder, harm reduction, and how to address the use of amphetamine-type substances.  Dr. Komaromy is currently serving as a Fulbright Scholar in Hanoi, Vietnam, performing research and providing education on treatment of substance use disorders.


    Michael Fingerhood

    MD, FACP

    Dr. Michael Fingerhood is an Associate Professor of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University. He is the Chief of the Division of Chemical Dependence and medical director of the Comprehensive Care Practice (CCP) at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The CCP integrates substance abuse treatment with primary medical care, including care for HIV and hepatitis C.

    Catherine Friedman

    MD

    Catherine R. Friedman, MD is a consulting psychiatrist in the Rhode Island Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals (BHDDH), and Medical Director for the Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families (DCYF). She is also an Assistant Professor (Clinical) at Warren Alpert Brown Medical School.  She has board certifications in Addiction Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and General Psychiatry. She has worked extensively with children, adolescents, and families affected by substance use disorder. Dr. Friedman received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan, did graduate work at The Rockefeller University in New York, and earned her medical degree from Harvard Medical School.  She completed an internship in obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at the University of California San Francisco. She trained in psychiatry at the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinics, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center where she completed a residency in general adult psychiatry and a fellowship in child and adolescent psychiatry.   At BHDDH, Dr. Friedman is involved with research, education, and provision of treatmentment for co-occuring psychiatric disorders throughout the state of Rhode Island. She is actively involved in resident and fellow education for Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine trainees at Brown. She is Chair of American Society of Addiction Medicine's CME committee and on that group's Medical Education Council. Her specific research and clinical interests include identification and treatment of co-occurring disorders and substance use disorders in adults and adolescents, addiction as a family disease, gender differences in co-occurring disorders, and perinatal addictions.  She has lectured in multiple settings, from local to international, on these and related topics and also published in these areas.

    Daniel P. Alford

    MD, MPH, FACP, DFASAM

    Dr. Daniel P. Alford is an Associate Professor of Medicine, Assistant Dean of CME and Director of the Safe and Competent Opioid Prescribing Education (SCOPE of Pain) program at Boston University School of Medicine. He is a diplomate in Addiction Medicine by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM).

    He is director of the Clinical Addiction Research and Education Unit medical director of the Office-Based Opioid Treatment (OBOT) program and of the Massachusetts Screening, Brief Intervention, Referral to Treatment Training and Technical Assistance (MASBIRT TTA) program and former program director for the Addiction Medicine Fellowship program at Boston Medical Center (BMC). Since 2001 he has served as the course director of the Chief Resident Immersion Training (CRIT) Program in Addiction Medicine: Improving Clinical and Teaching Skills for Generalists funded by NIDA. He is president of the Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA). In 2011, he was recognized as a Champion of Change by the White House. In 2014 he received the Health Education Award from the American Medical Association.

    Marcia Jackson

    PhD

    Dr. Marcia Jackson is President of CME by Design, a consulting group that provides the full range of instructional design services in the field of continuing medical education. Dr. Jackson served as division vice president and senior advisor for education at the American College of Cardiology from 1992-2007. She is a past President of the Alliance for Continuing Medical Education, a past member of the National Task Force on CME Provider/Industry Collaboration, and current chair of the Medscape Education Advisory Board, She is a recipient of the ACCME Robert Razskowski Award and the Alliance for CME Distinguished Service Award.  She has been an ASAM consultant since 2013.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Leading Small Group Learning Activities (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning how to develop effective interactive and collaborative teaching skills when working with small groups The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:


    The faculty in this interactive session will present brief “tips” in didactic format, each of which will be followed by small group discussion and an opportunity for participants to ask questions.  The topics will focus on developing effective interactive and collaborative teaching skills when working with small groups, including creating an interactive learning environment through the use of strategies such as polling, leading small group discussions, incorporating simulation and role-play into small group learning activities, and creating worksheets for use to guide small group discussions.  Special attention will be given to managing group dynamics so as to maintain participant focus and address varied types of participant interruptions.  The session design will illustrate 1/3 x 3 activity design, i.e., tell, show, do). The session format will allow the faculty to model these same tips in action.  The session will conclude with a review of how the session presented the tips in action.  


    Learning Objectives: 

    1.) Lead small group discussions using case-based strategies, simulations, modeling, and role-play
    2.) Develop worksheets to guide small group discussions and support learning activities
    3.) Adapt presentation strategies to diverse inter-professional audiences


    Peter Selby

    MBBS, CCFP, FCFP, DFASAM

    Peter Selby MD is the Director of Medical Education and a Clinician Scientist at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. He is a Professor in the Departments of Family and Community Medicine, Psychiatry, and the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto. He is also a Clinician Scientist in the Department of Family and Community Medicine. Dr. Selby is the Executive Director and creator of the TEACH project; a continuing education certificate program in Applied Counselling for Health with a focus on smoking cessation, through the University of Toronto. Dr. Selby’s research, as a Principal Investigator at the Ontario Tobacco Research Unit, includes smoking cessation especially in smokers with co-morbid conditions. As the Principal Investigator of the STOP Study, he investigates the effectiveness of NRT and counselling in different types of intervention settings. He is also the PI of CANADAPTT- a unique Canadian Smoking Cessation Guideline development and dissemination project. Dr. Selby also continues his clinical research with pregnant women who use substances and is the PI of a knowledge translation program (PREGNETS) to increase the adoption of evidence-based interventions with pregnant smokers. 

    He has received grant funding totaling over 80 million dollars from CIHR, NIH, and Ministry of Health and has published 130 peer reviewed publications. He has published 5 books (including 4 edited), is the author of 30 book chapters, and 32 research reports prepared for the government. He is the Co-Chair for the Ministry of Health Cessation Task force and the Chair of the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse National Task Force on Treatment for Prescription Drug Misuse. Dr. Selby mentors Fellows in Addiction Medicine and Addiction Psychiatry, junior investigators and medical students. Dr. Selby a sought after speaker for various topics including addictive disorders, motivational interviewing, and health behavior change.

    Miriam Komaromy

    , MD, FACP,DFASAM

    Dr. Miriam Komaromy is a physician and professor of medicine at the University of New Mexico in the United States.  She is board certified in Internal Medicine and Addiction Medicine.  She has been an Associate Director in the ECHO Institute, leading ECHO programs that are focused on treatment of substance use disorders for the past 13 years.  She consults with programs around the world on implementation of the ECHO model to expand access to specialized medical care, and particularly focuses on ECHO for addictions, mental health, care of complex populations, and ECHO programs to support community health workers. Dr. Komaromy provides clinical consultation and outpatient care for patients with complex substance use disorders.  She has served as Medical Director for New Mexico’s addiction treatment hospital, and led the development of the state’s guidelines for treatment of opioid use disorder.  Dr. Komaromy is a member of the board of directors of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), which is the largest addiction-specialty society in the United States.  She is vice-chair of ASAM’s national medical education committee, and she chairs their Fundamentals of addiction medicine committee.  She was recently elected ASAM educator of the year for 2019.  Dr. Komaromy lectures nationally and internationally on addiction medicine topics, including treatment of opioid use disorder, harm reduction, and how to address the use of amphetamine-type substances.  Dr. Komaromy is currently serving as a Fulbright Scholar in Hanoi, Vietnam, performing research and providing education on treatment of substance use disorders.


    Catherine Friedman

    MD

    Catherine R. Friedman, MD is a consulting psychiatrist in the Rhode Island Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals (BHDDH), and Medical Director for the Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families (DCYF). She is also an Assistant Professor (Clinical) at Warren Alpert Brown Medical School.  She has board certifications in Addiction Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and General Psychiatry. She has worked extensively with children, adolescents, and families affected by substance use disorder. Dr. Friedman received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan, did graduate work at The Rockefeller University in New York, and earned her medical degree from Harvard Medical School.  She completed an internship in obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at the University of California San Francisco. She trained in psychiatry at the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinics, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center where she completed a residency in general adult psychiatry and a fellowship in child and adolescent psychiatry.   At BHDDH, Dr. Friedman is involved with research, education, and provision of treatmentment for co-occuring psychiatric disorders throughout the state of Rhode Island. She is actively involved in resident and fellow education for Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine trainees at Brown. She is Chair of American Society of Addiction Medicine's CME committee and on that group's Medical Education Council. Her specific research and clinical interests include identification and treatment of co-occurring disorders and substance use disorders in adults and adolescents, addiction as a family disease, gender differences in co-occurring disorders, and perinatal addictions.  She has lectured in multiple settings, from local to international, on these and related topics and also published in these areas.

    Michael Fingerhood

    MD, FACP

    Dr. Michael Fingerhood is an Associate Professor of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University. He is the Chief of the Division of Chemical Dependence and medical director of the Comprehensive Care Practice (CCP) at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The CCP integrates substance abuse treatment with primary medical care, including care for HIV and hepatitis C.

    Daniel P. Alford

    MD, MPH, FACP, DFASAM

    Dr. Daniel P. Alford is an Associate Professor of Medicine, Assistant Dean of CME and Director of the Safe and Competent Opioid Prescribing Education (SCOPE of Pain) program at Boston University School of Medicine. He is a diplomate in Addiction Medicine by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM).

    He is director of the Clinical Addiction Research and Education Unit medical director of the Office-Based Opioid Treatment (OBOT) program and of the Massachusetts Screening, Brief Intervention, Referral to Treatment Training and Technical Assistance (MASBIRT TTA) program and former program director for the Addiction Medicine Fellowship program at Boston Medical Center (BMC). Since 2001 he has served as the course director of the Chief Resident Immersion Training (CRIT) Program in Addiction Medicine: Improving Clinical and Teaching Skills for Generalists funded by NIDA. He is president of the Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA). In 2011, he was recognized as a Champion of Change by the White House. In 2014 he received the Health Education Award from the American Medical Association.

    Marcia Jackson

    PhD

    Dr. Marcia Jackson is President of CME by Design, a consulting group that provides the full range of instructional design services in the field of continuing medical education. Dr. Jackson served as division vice president and senior advisor for education at the American College of Cardiology from 1992-2007. She is a past President of the Alliance for Continuing Medical Education, a past member of the National Task Force on CME Provider/Industry Collaboration, and current chair of the Medscape Education Advisory Board, She is a recipient of the ACCME Robert Razskowski Award and the Alliance for CME Distinguished Service Award.  She has been an ASAM consultant since 2013.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.