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  • The World of Weird Withdrawal (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning how to recognize the toxic syndromes that result from strategies patients use to self-treat opioid withdrawal. from this conference recording from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn that:


    With changing patterns of opioid use, a growing number of patients are at risk for experiencing opioid withdrawal. Due to convenient access to “pseudo-medical” information via social media and purchasing options on the Internet, patients may be using a variety of substances to “self-detox” or to mitigate withdrawal symptoms at home, such as kratom, ibogaine, and loperamide, all of which have potentially toxic effects. Treatment and recovery providers need to be knowledgeable of how patients self-treat opioid withdrawal, and to understand and manage the complications that arise from such practices. Additionally, patients may present with precipitated withdrawal from buprenorphine, naltrexone, or well-intended naloxone administration. These periods of intense withdrawal place patients at risk for medical complications and can jeopardize the early stages of recovery. Understanding the risks and optimizing management using opioid and non-opioid strategies can comfort patients and improve treatment engagement. This session is an interactive case-based workshop in which clinicians will discuss strategies to manage patients with atypical or unusually severe presentations related to opioid self-detoxification and precipitated withdrawal. Cases will illustrate the expected and unintended consequences related to the use of loperamide, kratom, and ibogaine as agents of self-detoxification. Attendees will develop approaches to diagnose and manage the complications of these so-called “alternative” detoxification agents, and learn to identify and treat the withdrawal that develops after regular use of kratom. We will also review the pathophysiology of precipitated withdrawal, discuss strategies to prevent this complication, and examine options to manage severe withdrawal. As there is currently no consensus on the best practices for treating atypical or complex opioid withdrawal, this session will offer an in-depth look at the benefits, risks, and knowledge gaps in rapid buprenorphine induction after naloxone- or naltrexone-precipitated withdrawal, and evaluate the use of other evidence-based agents such as opioid agonists, alpha-2 agonists, gabapentin, and atypical antipsychotics for patients with these multifaceted opioid withdrawal syndromes.  


    Learning Objectives:


    1.)  Recognize the toxic syndromes that result from strategies patients use to self-treat opioid withdrawal.

    2.)  Discuss the varied clinical presentation and management of patients with atypical or complex opioid withdrawal. 

    3.)  Identify methods to minimize the risk of and manage precipitated withdrawal from opioid antagonists or partial agonists.



    Aliana R. Steck

    MD

    Dr. Alaina Steck is a graduate of the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California, did her residency training in Emergency Medicine at Boston Medical Center, and completed fellowship at the Emory University / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Joint Fellowship in Medical Toxicology. She is board-certified in Emergency Medicine, Medical Toxicology, and Addiction Medicine, and practices all three clinical specialties at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia. She serves as an assitant medical director at the Georgia Poison Center and the medical director of the Grady Medication-Assisted Opioid Treatment clinic.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Enhancing Motivation, MAT Adherence & Retention with Routine Use of Contingency Management (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning how to describe the foundation for enhanced treatment outcomes in SUD patients using contingency management from this conference recording from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn that Contingency Management (CM) is the best-researched, most effective -- yet least utilized -- treatment innovation in addiction. After a half-century of research, clinicians still have numerous concerns: ethics (is it enabling to pay patients money?), resources (where will the money come from?), testing (frequent and visually witnessed drug testing?) & management (who will do the intricate accounting?). Technology can surmount each of these obstacles, with the added plus of patient engagement & relapse/dropout prediction. Providers will describe technology's potential for enhancing motivation, improving MAT adherence, & extending treatment retention. Data from thousands of patient events with several different technologic tools indicates that these approaches are feasible with many types of: Substance use disorders (from tobacco smoking to opioids) Subpopulations (from pregnant women to criminal justice-involved returning citizens to corporate executives) Providers (from counselors to case managers to recovery coaches), and Settings (from medical centers to recovery homes to national insurance companies). Finally, large data (e.g.,  < 90,000 financial transaction events from 1,400 patients) can generate imminent dropout and relapse indicators with good validity (e.g., 70% positive predictive value) that can be used to issue real-time alerts to providers to intervene -- even prior to a patient's return to drug use, allowing rapid treatment intensification without the need for repeat detoxification to address withdrawal. Impacts range from decreased drinking, to longer treatment retention to meaningful program completion (e.g., improving graduation rates from 67% to 87% within a justice-system involved long-term rehabilitation). Attendees will workshop how to achieve practical implementation within busy, oversubscribed and scarcely-resourced practices and treatment programs in the midst of an epidemic.


    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Explain the obstacles that have prevented wide-spread adoption of contingency management in routine care.

    2.) Describe the research foundation for enhancing treatment outcomes in patients with substance use disorders using contingency management. 

    3.) Analyze the utility of various new technologies that have been proposed and implemented to overcome the obstacles to adoption of contingency management.

    David Gastfriend

    MD, DFASAM

    David R. Gastfriend, MD, served on the faculty of Harvard Medical School for 25 years, most recently as Director of the Addiction Research Program at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). His studies of the Patient Placement Criteria published by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) have been supported by the NIH's National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, U.S. state governments, managed care corporations, including Aetna Behavioral Healthcare, and foreign governments, including Belgium, Finland, Iceland, Israel, Norway, Switzerland, and the World Health Organization. The author of over 125 scientific publications, he has served on the Boards and Editorial Boards of a number of societies and journals, including ASAM and the International Society of Addiction Medicine (ISAM). He is co-editor of the leading book on treatment matching in the field, The ASAM Patient Placement Criteria for Substance-Related Disorders and editor of Addiction Treatment Matching. In addition to his role at RecoverySearch, Dr. Gastfriend is also Vice President for Scientific Communications at Alkermes, Inc. (NASDAQ: ALKS) where he is involved in research, education and scientific publication on extended-release naltrexone (VIVITROL®) and the company's efforts in the field of addiction treatment.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Opening Scientific Plenary & Distinguished Scientist Lecture (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning how to understand and mitigate risk factors leading up to drug use from this conference recording from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn that:

    The Special ASAM 50th Annual Conference begins with an energizing Opening Scientific Plenary Session and highlights from the past 50 years. Moderated by ASAM President Kelly J. Clark, MD, MBA, DFAPA, DFASAM, distinguished presenters of the opening session will focus on incredible cutting-edge science in addiction medicine and a new paradigm of hope for prevention and treatment. Nora D. Volkow, MD Science Advances in the Prevention and Treatment of Opioid Addiction The misuse of and addiction to opioids"including prescription pain relievers, heroin, and synthetic opioids such as fentanyl"has resulted in a national crisis that we have not yet been able to revert. This presentation will highlight how NIH researchers are using scientific advances being made to turn the tide in the opioid crisis through the development of: new medications to treat pain; innovative drug abuse prevention strategies that can mitigate an individual’s vulnerability to addiction; and promising strategies that can successfully treat opioid use disorder and prevent and reverse overdose. Bankole Johnson Personalizing the Treatment for Alcohol Use Disorders This presentation will characterize the development of a genetic-based treatment for alcohol use disorders from animals to humans as well as prospects for regulatory approval. What is the genetic loading for alcohol use disorder? What is an inverted U-shaped dose curve? What is the frequency of the target genetic cohort for the treatment of alcohol use disorders? David & Nic Sheff A New Paradigm Facing America's Drug Use and Addiction Crises We're in crisis, but there's hope. The hope is a new paradigm for preventing and treating drug use and addiction in America. For prevention, we focus on drugs, but the key to prevention is a recognition of why people use them--understanding and mitigating risk factors. For treatment: We're at the beginning of a sea change as we reject failed efforts of the past -- ones based on the view that addiction is a choice -- and replace it with one based on the science of addiction medicine. We've a long way to go at a time we're losing more people under 50 from overdose than anything else. But we have a roadmap.
    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Designer Drugs Update 2019: Phenibut, Synthetic Opioids, & More (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning how to recognize clinical clues to intoxication with emerging designer drugs, and ways to differentiate from other drug use from this conference recording from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn that/about:

    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Identify emerging designer drugs, including phenibut, synthetic opioids, and others.

    2.) Recognize clinical clues to intoxication with emerging designer drugs, and ways to differentiate from other drug use.

    3.) Discuss treatment of medical and psychiatric complications resulting from use of designer drugs.

    Patterns of drug abuse are constantly changing. This is particularly the case regarding new psychoactive substances or designer drugs, in which new variants are continually emerging with uptake especially among young adults. New synthetic designer drugs can be challenging to identify and treat effectively, especially serious medical and psychiatric complications. This is important for practitioners, as new designer drugs have resulted in multiple deaths, as well as other significant health consequences to users. This session will educate practitioners about several newer designer drugs regarding use trends along with psychotropic and health effects. Session description: This focus session will inform attendees with a discussion�"including clinical case examples�"that will focus on emerging designer drugs, including phenibut, synthetic opioids, and others. Use of these drugs has caused significant medical and psychiatric consequences, including multiple deaths, which has received recent media attention.  The presentation will be evidence-based and draw from existing medical literature, and will also include the panelists’ clinical experience with patients experiencing designer drug use and complications. The emphasis will be on clinical issues, especially recognition of intoxication, problems related to detection with urine drug testing, and treatment of medical and psychiatric complications. Attention will be given to specific populations that have been shown to be using these designer drugs. The presenters are experienced clinicians who have been involved in evaluation of patients using designer drugs. The presenters have also published about designer drugs in peer-reviewed journals. Attendees will be able to share their own experiences with patient use of designer drugs to enrich the discussion. Time will be allowed for questions to the panelists so that there will be significant interaction during this focus session. Conclusions: This focus session will provide attendees with evidence-based clinical knowledge to help identify and treat complications from newer designer drug use, especially those with life-threatening complications.  

    Michael F. Weaver

    MD, DFASAM

    Dr. Michael Weaver is Professor of Psychiatry and Medical Director of the Center for Neurobehavioral Research on Addiction at The University of Texas McGovern Medical School at Houston. He completed a Residency in Internal Medicine and a Clinical Research Fellowship in Addiction Medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University. He is involved in patient care, medical education, and research. Dr. Weaver has multiple publications in the field of addiction medicine. He treats patients at the Innovations Addiction Treatment Clinic at the Texas Medical Center in Houston, which provides medication-assisted treatment. He is the Sub-Board Chair for Addiction Medicine for the American Board of Preventive Medicine.  He is a member of the ASAM Publications Council and on the Editorial Board for the Journal of Addiction Medicine.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Big Ideas Plenary (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning what ideas are shaping the future of addiction medicine from this conference recording from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    What big ideas are shaping the future of addiction medicine? Draw inspiration from ASAM award recipients and insight from national innovators during the Big Ideas Plenary Session. ASAM President Kelly J. Clark, MD, MBA, DFAPA, DFASAM, will recognize award recipients on-stage and with personalized video clips of individuals making major contributions to the field. She will also moderate an informal fireside chat with representatives from the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA), the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), and the Office of the Surgeon General. Agency leaders will each give a five-minute presentation on one innovative big idea from their respective institutions. The session will conclude with stimulating questions and lively conversation.

    Nora Volkow, MD

    Director, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health

    Nora D. Volkow, M.D., became Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) at the National Institutes of Health in May 2003. Her work has been instrumental in demonstrating that drug addiction is a disease of the human brain. She pioneered the use of brain imaging to investigate the toxic effects and addictive properties of abusable drugs and has also made important contributions to the neurobiology of obesity, ADHD, and aging.

    Dr. Volkow was born in Mexico, earned her medical degree from the National University of Mexico, and carried out her psychiatric residency at New York University. Prior to her tenure at NIDA she held leadership positions at the Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory including Director of Nuclear Medicine, Chairman of the Medical Department, and Associate Director for Life Sciences. She was also a professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Associate Dean of the Medical School at the State University of New York (SUNY)-Stony Brook.

    Dr. Volkow has published more than 600 scientific articles and edited three books on neuroimaging for mental and addictive disorders. Among her many awards have been selection for membership in the Institute of Medicine, and the International Prize from the French Institute of Health and Medical Research. She was also named one of Time Magazine's “Top 100 People Who Shape our World", included as “One of the 20 People to Watch" by Newsweek magazine, and named “Innovator of the year" by U.S. News & World Report in 2000.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Harm Reduction in the Addiction Continuum: Not as Radical As One Thinks (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning how harm reduction can be used in clinical practice from this conference recording from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    Learning Objectives:


    1.) Review the definition and background of harm reduction and demonstrate that it is congruent with the management of patients with other chronic relapsing illnesses.

    2.) Describe case examples of patients who benefit from low threshold or harm reduction care to keep them engaged, and to lower the risks associated with ongoing substance use.

    3.) Identify opportunities for integrating harm reduction into your own practice.

    The hallmark of addiction is loss of control and ongoing compulsive substance use despite negative consequences and is underscored by significant difficulty in executive functioning and organization.  As such, especially early on in care or at a time of relapse, highly structured treatment modalities and scheduling are unrealistic for many at best, and potentially lethal for others at worst.   If late or missed appointments result in longer waits or missed opportunities for care, or substance use results in discharge from care or referral to a higher level of care when the patient is either not able or ready to make such a change, the result can be no level of care. Despite prescription drug monitoring programs, misuse deterrent opioid formulations, expanded education efforts for safe pain prescribing and SUD screening and management, increased buprenorphine trainings and expanded waivers, the substance use disorder treatment gap remains and the opioid overdose epidemic continues to soar.  The landscape of the opioid epidemic has changed even more dramatically with fentanyl and carfentanyl, requiring more readily available care and flexible care models to help keep people engaged in care, while we work with them through the natural history of substance use disorder.  By partnering with patients in this manner, we help keep them alive, lower their risk of ongoing serious health complications or overdose, and increase their chances of continuing to engage in meaningful treatment; we collaborate with them in the practice of harm reduction. The session organizers will review harm reduction as patient centered care congruent with the practice of all medical specialties.    They will describe specific case examples of how harm reduction can be used in clinical practice, review flexible care models to engage patients with ambivalence or other competing life priorities, and explore ways to gain buy-in from colleagues in order to shift culture and increase comfort in providing harm reduction care within their continuum. The second half of the session will be spent in small groups where participants will review potential barriers to incorporating harm reduction into practice and explore how they would envision operationalizing and providing such care within their current practice.  

    Laura G. Kehoe

    MD, MPH, FASAM

    Dr. Kehoe is an Assistant Physician at Massachusetts General Hospital and an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and is board certified in both Internal Medicine and Addiction Medicine.  She attended Tufts University School of Medicine and Boston University School of Public Health and completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital.   At Massachusetts General Hospital, she is the Medical Director of the Substance Use Disorder Bridge Clinic, an immediate access, urgent care addiction program.   She is actively involved in medical student and resident education as an attending physician on the inpatient Addiction Consult Team (ACT), and she is the co-chair of the hospital-wide Substance Use Disorder Education Committee, where she works with other team members to expand evidence-based treatment of patients with addiction. 

    Outside of MGH, she was the Medical Director of Baycove Treatment Center for Opiate Addictions Methadone Maintenance program and she treats patients as part of a multidisciplinary addiction team at the supportive housing and outpatient non-profit, Right Turn.   Lastly, Dr. Kehoe is a founding member of W.A.T.E.R.town (Watertown Access to Treatment Education and Recovery), a community coalition working to expand prevention, intervention and treatment for people with substance use disorder in Watertown, MA.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Pharmacotherapy Studies to Prevent Opioid Relapse Following Jail Release: Lessons Learned (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about opioid addiction problems in jail from this conference recording from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:


    Opioid use disorder (OUD) in US jail populations is a major public health concern. Individuals with OUD who do not receive treatment during incarceration have high rates of relapse and are exposed to increased risk of overdose death upon release. Despite the proven effectiveness of methadone and extended release naltrexone treatment for OUD, these medications are rarely initiated prior to release from jail. The National Institute on Drug Abuse funded a cooperative study consisting of three randomized clinical trials to examine the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy initiated prior to release from jails in Albuquerque, NM, Baltimore, MD, and New York, NY. These studies randomly assigned opioid-addicted adults in jail to begin: methadone treatment with or without patient navigation, or an enhanced treatment as usual condition (in Baltimore, N=225); to extended release naltrexone with and without patient navigation, or enhanced treatment as usual (in Albuquerque, N=150); and, to extended release naltrexone or enhanced treatment as usual (in New York, N=255). This series of presentations will outline the scope of the opioid addiction problem in jails, the rationale and use of these medications in jails, challenges in implementing these approaches in jail and post-release, and medical and psychiatric co-morbidities in this patient population.  Main results to date will be presented, including: patient willingness to be treated, rates of study treatment retention after release, and community drug treatment outcomes. Audience discussion surrounding opioid treatment in criminal justice settings will be encouraged.

    Learning Objectives:


    1.) Participants will be able to list three challenges to implementing pharmacotherapy for opioid addiction in jails.
    2.) participants will be able to describe the benefits of providing methadone and extended release naltrexone prior to release from jail.
    3.) participants will be able to describe the role of patient navigation in linking patients to opioid addiction treatment across the jail to community treatment chasm.


    Robert P. Schwartz

    MD

    Dr. Schwartz is a psychiatrist and Medical Director of the Friends Research Institute. He is Co-Principal Investigator of the Mid-Atlantic Node of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network. He has studied pharmacotherapy for Opioid Use Disorder in the community and in jail and prison through numerous NIDA grant award and has over 150 scientific publications. Dr Schwartz is Associate Professor of Psychiatry and is the recipient of the Dole-Nyswander Award from the American Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependence.

    Joshua D. Lee

    MD, MSc, FASAM

    Joshua D. Lee MD, MSc is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Population Health and Medicine at the NYU School of Medicine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Addiction Medicine and is a physician at Bellevue Hospital Center, NYU Langone Medical Center, and in the NYC jails. He directs the NYU ABAM Fellowship in Addiction Medicine. His research focuses on novel and medication treatments for addiction among criminal justice and primary care populations.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Opioid Misuse, Overdose, and Suicide: Correlates and Intervention Strategies (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about opioid use and chronic pain as risk factors for suicide and/or overdose risk from this conference recording from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:


    According to 2016 NSDUH, 2 million adults (aged 18 or older) met criteria for an opioid use disorder (OUD) and 42,000 of overdose deaths are attributable to opioids. In the same year, an estimated 1.3 million adults attempted suicide. It is estimated that over 11million US adults experience daily pain. Various studies have concluded that depression and pain frequently co-occur and increase the risk for suicidal behaviors/suicide or overdose. However, the intersection among these conditions is often complex and contributions not well established. Furthermore, in the context of chronic pain or OUD, determining the cause of death as either a drug overdose or suicide is a challenge due to the entwined nature of these conditions. However, the evidence base to inform clinicians in the selection and sequencing of effective treatment strategies is limited. In this symposium, we propose to characterize these populations and disentangle some of these complex associations among chronic pain, opioid misuse/OUD, and risk for suicide and overdose.  The talks will highlight the correlates and risks in patients exposed to prescription opioids as well as those who have OUD. Content also includes some suggestions for methods to identify key risk, and provide a review of the evidence for prevention interventions to reduce suicide, factors in these populations. The final speaker will review the literature on effective treatments for OUD and Depression and discuss its potential for lowering OD/suicide risks.   
    1.) Recognize the prevalence and correlates of opioid use and chronic pain as risk factors for suicide and/or overdose risk
    2.) Identify ways to identify these risk factors and become familiar with prevention interventions to reduce the risk for suicide
    3.) Review the existing literature on combining or integrating depression and OUD treatments with the aim of lowering risk for overdose or suicide.




    Geetha Subramaniam

    MD., DFAPA, DFAACAP

    Dr. Subramaniam is the Deputy Director of the Center for Clinical Trials Network, at NIDA. In this role, she has been instrumental in developing research projects in a variety of topic areas, including addressing the prevention of substance abuse in adolescents, prevention and intervention of prescription stimulant misuse in youth. Previously, she was a full-time faculty member in the Division of Child Psychiatry at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the Associate Medical Director of Mountain Manor Treatment Center, Baltimore, MD, where she led clinical trials with adolescents with SUD and served as a preceptor to residents and fellows. She distinguished herself as a clinical and research expert in the assessment and treatment of adolescents and young adults with opioid use disorders. She is ABPN certified in General, Child, and Adolescent, and Addiction Psychiatry and a Distinguished Fellow of both the American Psychiatric Association and the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

    Martin D. Cheatle

    PhD

    Dr. Martin Cheatle, Clinical Psychologist, Director, Behavioral Medicine at Penn Pain Medicine Center earned his PhD in psychology at Princeton University. He completed his clinical internship at the University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine and founded the Orthopaedic Pain Center at PENN. Currently he is Director of Behavioral Medicine at the PENN Pain Medicine Center and Director, Pain and Chemical Dependency Research at the Center for Studies of Addiction, University of Pennsylvania. He is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania.  Dr. Cheatle specializes in the evaluation and treatment of chronic pain disorders from a biopsychosocial perspective and has been involved in extensive research including a NIH funded 5-year longitudinal study of the development of addiction in patients initiating prescription opioid therapy for chronic pain and as PI of a currently funded NIH/NIDA grant assessing phenotypic and genotypic markers of prescription opioid abuse.  His main focus of research is pain management and addiction in vulnerable populations (HIV/AIDS, psychiatric patients) and pain and suicidal ideation and behavior. 

    Mark Ilgen

    PhD

    Mark A. Ilgen, Ph.D. is a clinical psychologist, a professor of psychiatry, and an investigator with the VA Center for Clinical Management Research (CCMR) at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System. Much of his current work focuses on improving treatment outcomes for patients struggling with substance use disorders and complicated co-occurring problems, particularly chronic pain, other psychiatric disorders, and suicide risk. In working with adults who have drug and alcohol problems, his goal is to help them reverse the course of addiction as quickly as possible to minimize the damaging effects on other areas of their lives. For individuals grappling with both addiction and chronic pain, Dr. Ilgen has developed an intervention that can help address both problems and also minimize the treatment challenges that opioids, cannabis and alcohol often present for this population. He is in the process of conducting research to determine the potential effectiveness of this intervention. Dr. Ilgen is also keenly interested in evaluating addiction treatment approaches to identify the factors most important to patient motivation, quality of life during treatment, and outcomes. He is also the principal investigator of a study to better understand marijuana use for pain management and the potential implications for patient outcomes as well as health policy.

    Richard Ries

    MD, F.A.P.A., F.A.S.M

    RICHARD K. RIES, MD Professor, Director, Addictions Division Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences University of Washington School of Medicine Seattle, Washington Richard K. Ries, MD, is Professor of Psychiatry, and Director of the Addictions Division in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle, Washington, and Director of the Addiction Treatment services at Harborview Medical Center in downtown Seattle. Dr. Ries received his undergraduate degree from Stanford, medical degree from Northwestern Medical School and completed his psychiatric residency at the University of Washington, Seattle, where he was Chief Resident. Dr. Ries is board-certified in Psychiatry by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology with Added Qualifications in Addiction Psychiatry, and the American Board of Addiction Medicine. A Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and a Fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine, he is on the editorial board and a reviewer for several scientific journals and has been involved with numerous research grants from the National Institute of Health. In addition he has been active in both studying and treating persons with opioid use disorders, with involvement in SAMHSA grants and the Harborview Addictions program opioid treatment tracks. He has been senior editor of the key reference text: Principles of Addiction Medicine (editions IV and V, published by the American Society of Addiction Medicine, and a noted expert in the field of Addictions, Suicide and other Co-occurring Disorders.

    Edward Nunes

    MD

    Dr. Nunes is a Professor of Psychiatry, and Principal Investigator of the Greater New York Node of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) clinical Trials Network as well as other NIDA funded studies on behavioral and medication treatments for substance dependence and related psychiatric disorders. Interests and ongoing studies include treatments for cocaine dependence in general, heroin and other opioid dependence, for nicotine dependence in general, and for addicted patients with co-occurring psychiatric disorders including depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Types of treatment under study include medication treatments (naltrexone, buprenorphine, mirtazapine) as well as behavioral and psychotherapeutic approaches and computer-delivered treatments. Dr. Nunes also studies the challenges involved in implementing evidence-based treatments for substance use disorders in real-world community-based treatments settings. Dr. Nunes also serves on the American Board of Addiction Medicine, Co-Chair of the Columbia/ New York State Psychiatric Institute's Institutional Review Board, and has been appointed to the National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • An Assertive Approach for Youth OUD: Family Engagement and Medication Home Delivery (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about clinical models for the treatment of youth with opioid use disorders from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:


    Young people are disproportionately affected by the current opioid epidemic, with catastrophic consequences for youth and their families. But adolescents and young adults with OUD generally have poor engagement in care, and worse treatment outcomes than older adults. Fewer than 25% of adolescents with OUD receive any relapse prevention medication.  Despite the clear and urgent need, there is still a lack of research and clinical consensus on youth-specific treatment models. In particular, while we have evidence for effectiveness of medications, we have little evidence for the most effective delivery models for these medications. We have a long way to go in optimizing engagement and retention. Assertive interventions, including home delivery of medication,s have had a role in overcoming barriers to retention and adherence in numerous chronic relapsing-remitting illnesses, including Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) for severe and persistent mental illness.  This session will feature an innovative approach to treatment for high-severity OUD in youth, including assertive outreach, family engagement and home delivery of relapse prevention medications. The session will begin with a description of the intervention. Family engagement empowers families, providing guidance for monitoring and improving adherence for youth in treatment. Confidentiality is sometimes seen as a barrier, and young adults may have developmentally normative resistance to involving their families. But respecting the emerging autonomy of youth and including families are not incompatible with one another. In fact, treatment of youth proceeds best as a collaboration among youth, parents and the treatment team. Additionally, clinic-based treatment can present barriers to treatment access. Home-based services, including monthly administration of extended release naltrexone or extended release buprenorphine, have the potential to overcome many of these barriers. By literally meeting youth and families where they are, in their homes, we may be able to engage and retain youth that are not be likely to succeed in clinic-based settings. The workshop will continue with an interactive discussion of cases vignettes that illustrate the non-linear clinical courses characteristic of this patient population, the decision points in clinical trajectories, and the conundrums in management. There will be a particular focus on practical clinical strategies in leveraging family involvement. Finally, the session will summarize results to date in evaluating the model. Our small published case series (Vo et al , 2017) showed promising results with an increase in retention and number of doses received, compared to a historical comparison group of clinic-based treatment as usual. In an interim analysis of the first 25 subjects in a randomized trial currently underway, preliminary results show that the intervention group had a significantly greater mean number of doses over the first 3 months (2.5 doses) compared to the usual care control (0.3 doses). The intervention group also had a lower rate of OUD relapse (27%) than the control group (91%). There will also be ample opportunity throughout for Q&A and discussion.  



    Learning Objectives:


    1.) Describe limitations to clinic based clinical models for the treatment of youth with opioid use disorders 
    2.) Describe developmental vulnerabilities of youth that act as barriers to access, engagement and retention
    3.) Describe approaches to overcoming barriers to care for youth with OUDs 


    Marc J. Fishman

    MD, DFASAM

    Marc Fishman MD is board certified in addiction psychiatry and addiction medicine. A faculty member of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, he is Medical Director and CEO of Maryland Treatment Centers, a regional behavioral health care provider, with inpatient and outpatient facilities for adolescents and adults. His clinical specialties include treatment of drug-involved and dual-diagnosis adolescents, opioid dependence in adolescents and adults, and co-occurring disorders. He has been principal investigator or collaborator for several NIDA- and CSAT-funded projects to improve and evaluate adolescent treatment, as well as pharmacotherapy trials in adults. He is the author of numerous articles and book chapters on addiction treatment, and lectures widely on a variety of topics including adolescent treatment, youth opioid treatment, placement and treatment matching strategies. Dr. Fishman served as a co-editor for the most recent editions of ASAMs Patient Placement Criteria, leading the adolescent section, and served as the chief editor for the ASAM PPC Supplement on Pharmacotherapies for Alcohol Use Disorders. He is the chair of the Adolescent Committee for ASAM. He is a Past President of the Maryland Society of Addiction Medicine.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Talk Amongst Yourselves: Case-based Discussions on Buprenorphine Treatment Challenges (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about overcoming common barriers to prescribing buprenorphine from this conference recording from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:


    Of the 70,237 drug overdoses in 2017, the majority were related to opioids. In response to the worsening opioid epidemic, the Department of Health and Human Services expanded buprenorphine prescribing privileges to include Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants and increased prescribing limits for physicians in 2016. However, even among physicians who already have DATA 2000 waivers, up to 40 percent have never prescribed buprenorphine. In order to increase access to this essential treatment for patients across the country, we must motivate waivered providers from all specialties to prescribe. Research with physician prescribers has identified numerous barriers to buprenorphine prescribing including provider attitudes, payment issues, lack of education and lack of structural support. These barriers occur at patient, provider and systems levels. Case-based experiential learning can address these barriers and empower interdisciplinary clinicians to effectively provide buprenorphine. In a 90 minute workshop, a multidisciplinary panel from the Substance Use Warmline will lead brief didactics and facilitate case reviews for three challenging scenarios in opioid use disorder management. Attendees will participate in small group case reviews of the following cases: 1) chronic pain and mental health 2) pregnancy and postpartum 3) polysubstance use. Groups will be guided to address patient, provider and systems level approaches to management for each case. Peer support resources and clinical tools will be discussed and shared as part of each case. Finally, the panel will review lessons learned in how to build a successful buprenorphine practice.


    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Utilize evidence-based practice and clinical tools to overcome common barriers to prescribing buprenorphine in a variety of healthcare settings
    2.) Analyze real cases to identify opportunities for skills-building in patient, provider and system domains 
    3.) Build confidence among buprenorphine prescribers and inspire non-prescribers to consider applying for their DATA 2000 waiver 


    Rebecca L S Martinez

    MS, RN, FNP-C

    Rebecca Martinez is a family nurse practitioner who works at the intersection of HIV prevention, primary care and substance use disorder management. She's jazzed to be part of an interdisciplinary team of providers on the Substance Use Warmline at the UCSF Clinician Consultation Center, where she provides clinical support to the inspiring healthcare workers across the country who are doing their best to manage patients with substance use.

    Hannah Snyder

    MD

    Assistant Clinical Professor at University of California San Francisco
     

    Erin R. Lutes

    MS, RN, PHN, CNS

    Erin R Lutes is a Clinical Nurse Specialist and Public Health Nurse specializing in HIV/AIDS. She provides expert consultation on HIV prevention and substance use disorders to clinicians across the United States with the Clinician Consultation Center based at the University of California, San Francisco. She also works for the San Francisco Department of Public Health as a Registered Nurse in primary and urgent care, serving populations impacted by substance use disorders, mental health, homelessness and HIV. In addition, she is adjunct faculty at Samuel Merritt University for students placed at an outpatient treatment facility for Native Americans. She is a US Albert Schweitzer Fellow for Life.

    Elizabeth Gatewood

    DNP, RN, FNP-C, RN, CNE

    Elizabeth Gatewood is an Associate Clinical Professor. She has been teaching for the past five years in the Family Nurse Practitioner program at UCSF. She has maintained a practice where she precepts students. Her clinical practice is at Family Health Center at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, the catchment hospital for uninsured or underinsured in the public health department. There she integrates treatment of substance use disorder into her primary care practice. 

    Jacqueline P. Tuisky

    MD

    Jacqueline Peterson Tulsky, MD is a Professor of Medicine, Emeritus at UCSF in the HIV, Infectious Disease and Global Medicine Division at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital (ZSFGH), the SF County safety net hospital.  She is faculty on the Clincians Consultation Center, Substance Use Warmline, a  program of  the UCSF Dept of  Family and Community Medicine at ZSFGH.  Dr. Tulsky is Boarded in Intermal Medicine and  Board hopeful  in  Addiction Medicine.   

    Triveni Defries

    MD, MPH

    Triveni DeFries, MD, MPH,  is an internist and current Primary Care Addiction Medicine fellow at University of California, San Francisco/San Francisco General Hospital. Prior to fellowship, she was practicing with the Indian Health Service in the Navajo Nation. Her interests include addiction medicine, primary care transformation, trauma informed care, immigrant health and native health.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.