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  • SAMHSA Spotlight on MATx Webinar

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    SAMHSA Spotlight on MATx Webinar will discuss medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for opioid use disorder and resources to support health care practitioners who currently provide MAT or plan to do so in the future.

    Sponsored by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA), Spotlight on MATx webinar will discuss medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for opioid use disorder and resources to support health care practitioners who currently provide MAT or plan to do so in the future. Participants will be guided through a step-by-step overview of the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 (DATA 2000) waiver process, learn how naloxone can be used to reverse the effects of opioid overdose, and discuss current efforts to address the opioid crisis in America. SAMHSA will also unveil MATx, a new mobile app that empowers practitioners to provide effective, evidence-based care

    • Primary care providers and internal medicine specialists
    • Addiction medicine specialists
    • Opioid treatment program providers
    • DATA-waived practitioners
    • Practitioners interested in becoming DATA-waived or learning more about the process
    • National stakeholders (government and nongovernmental organizations)
    • White House Opioid Task Force Committee and their constituents
    • Consumer advocacy organizations
    • Academic institutions

    Upon completion of this webinar, participants will:

    1. Understand the evidence base and benefits of MAT for opioid use disorder.
    2. Discuss how the DATA 2000 can support a clinician using the MAT approach for opioid use disorder.
    3. Summarize the DATA 2000 waiver process and explore resources to support clinicians in becoming DATA-waived, increasing patient limits, and updating their information.
    4. Understand how naloxone and MAT programs can help prevent and treat opioid overdose.
    5. Explore features of SAMHSA's MATx mobile app that support practitioners who are actively engaged in MAT for opioid use disorder.
    6. Identify at least two resources available to support the continued use and integration of MAT into their practice.

    CME Information and Disclosure Listing

    Date of Release: October 21, 2016
    Approved Through: October 21, 2018

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits. Physicians should claim only credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    In accordance with the disclosure policies of ASAM and the ACCME, the effort is made to ensure balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all educational activities. These policies include resolving all conflicts of interest between the CME Committee, Planning Committee and faculty, and commercial interests that might otherwise compromise the goal and educational integrity of this activity. All CME Committee, Planning Committee and faculty participating in the activity have disclosed all relevant financial relationships with commercial interests. The CME Committee has reviewed these disclosures and determined that the planning committee and faculty relationships are not inappropriate in the content of their respective presentations and are not inconsistent with the educational goals and integrity of the activity.

    ASAM CME Committee

    Name

    Nature of Relevant Financial Relationship

    Commercial Interest

    What was received?

    For what role?

    Adam J. Gordon, MD, MPH, FACP, FASAM, Chair

    None

    Edwin A. Salsitz, MD, FASAM

    None

    Herbert Malinoff, MD, FACP, FASAM

    None



    Noel Ilogu, MD, MRCP

    None

    Abigail Kay, MD

    None

    John Tanner, DO, FASAM

    Reckitt Benckiser

    OREXO

    BDSI

    Honorarium

    Honorarium

    Honorarium

    Speaker

    Speaker

    Speaker and Consultant

    Catherine Friedman, MD

    None

    SAMHSA Spotlight on MATx Planning Committee

    Name

    Nature of Relevant Financial Relationship

    Commercial Interest

    What was received?

    For what role?

    Alejandra Brackett

    None

    Robert T. Carroll, PhD(c), RN, MN, ACRN

    None


    Lisa H. Falconer, MPH, CHES

    Cynapsus

    Stipend to spouseParticipation in board meeting

    Kaitlin A. White, BS

    None


    SAMHSA Spotlight on MATx Faculty

    Name

    Nature of Relevant Financial Relationship

    Commercial Interest

    What was received?

    For what role?

    Mitra Ahadpour, MD, DABAM

    None

    Anita Everett, MDNone
    Sharon Stancliff, MDNone
    R. Corey Waller, MD, MS, DFASAMNone

    ASAM CME Committee Reviewers

    Name

    Nature of Relevant Financial Relationship

    Commercial Interest

    What was received?

    For what role?

    Adam J. Gordon, MD, MPH, FACP, FASAM

    None

    Mitra Ahadpour, MD, DABAM

    Director, Division of Pharmacologic Therapies, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, SAMHSA

    Dr. Mitra Ahadpour, MD, DABAM, is a licensed primary care physician, board certified in Addiction Medicine, with over 10 years of providing medical care in Maryland. She is a Medical Officer in the Division of Pharmacologic Therapies at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. During Dr. Ahadpour's tenure at the National Institutes of Health, she developed strategic plans, policies and goals to eliminate health disparities. Clinical intervention points across the lifespan were identified to reduce substance use and detect mental illness in the health disparate population, and evidence-based guidelines were assessed to improve preventive health services. In private practice, she contributed to legislation making Maryland smoke-free and, as chair of Montgomery County Medical Society's Community Service Programs, created and launched a tobacco awareness in middle schools. She attained her MD from the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Her primary care residency was completed at the George Washington University Hospital.

    Anita Everett, MD

    Chief Medical Officer

    SAMHSA recently hired Anita Everett, M.D., to serve as the new chief medical officer. Dr. Everett will lead a staff of five in SAMHSA's new Office of the Chief Medical Officer (OCMO) where they will focus on expanding effective, innovative, and science-supported approaches to behavioral health.

    Dr. Everett is currently the division director of Johns Hopkins Community and General Psychiatry, Bayview Campus, in Baltimore, and associate professor at the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health Sciences at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Earlier this year she was selected as president-elect for the American Psychiatric Association (APA). She also was past president for both the Maryland Psychiatric Society and the American Association of Community Psychiatrists.

    Dr. Everett previously worked with SAMHSA as senior medical advisor where she worked on projects centered on the promotion of access to quality services and appropriate medications. She will begin her new role at SAMHSA on September 5.

    Sharon Stancliff

    MD, FAAFP

    Sharon Stancliff, M.D. is the Medical Director of the Harm Reduction Coalition She oversees SKOOP, which provides overdose prevention services both directly in New York City and through education and capacity building nationally and internationally. Dr. Stancliff also consults on drug related problems for the AIDS Institute, New York State Department of Health and for several international organizations. 

    Dr. Stancliff graduated from the School of Medicine at University of California at Davis, did her Family Practice residency at the University of Arizona and completed the AIDS Institute-sponsored Nicolas Rango HIV Clinical Scholars Program at Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City. She is board certified in Family Medicine, a Fellow of the American Academy of Family Practice, and certified by the American Board of Addiction Medicine. She serves as secretary for the New York Society of Addiction Medicine.

    R. Corey Waller

    MD, MS, DFASAM

    R. Corey Waller, MD, MS, FACEP, DFASAM, is an addiction, pain and emergency medicine specialist. Dr. Waller earned his bachelor's degree in biology and his master's degree in neuromolecular biology at Southwest Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas. He earned his medical degree at University of Texas Medical School in San Antonio. Dr. Waller completed his emergency medicine residency at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. He is board certified and fellowship trained in addiction medicine.

  • The ASAM State of the Art Course in Addiction Medicine 2016

    Contains 9 Product(s)

    The nation’s leading course on scientific advances and emerging evidence in addiction medicine!

    The ASAM State of the Art Course in Addiction Medicine 2016 course video recordings.

    This course is designed specifically for physicians and health care professionals seeking an advanced level of knowledge about breakthroughs in the field and will include:

    • Presentations focused on scientific advances and emerging evidence in addiction medicine
    • Sessions organized around ten topics that translate into clinically useful knowledge
    • Special addresses by directors of federal agencies including SAMHSA, NIDA, NIAAA
    • Concise presentations delving into understanding, preventing, diagnosing and treating addiction and co-occurring medical and psychiatric disorders

    At the conclusion of the course, participants should be able to:

    1. Review the latest epidemiology and prescribing guidelines for opioids and treatment approaches for Opioid Use Disorder
    2. Discuss the latest trends in marijuana legislation, policy, testing, synthetic cannabinoids and implications for practice
    3. Review best practice guidelines for management of Opioid Use Disorder and management of the pregnant substance user
    4. Understand changes in healthcare delivery resulting from the Affordable Care Act and electronic health records implementation
    5. Review clinical management of medical and psychiatric comorbidities seen in patients with substance use disorders
    6. Describe brain imaging technologies and how these are changing the view of the addicted brain
    7. Describe new pharmacotherapies for alcohol and opioid use disorders

    Who should attend:

    • Addiction medicine specialists who are interested in the latest research in the field and its translation to clinical practice
    • Physicians and other health care professionals who seek an advanced level of knowledge of addiction medicine
    • Primary care clinicians who manage patients with addiction in their practice
    • Scientists, researchers, public health officials and advocates dedicated to the field of addiction medicine
  • Brain Imaging & Addiction: New Findings (2.25 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Session 9 from The ASAM State of the Art Course in Addiction Medicine contains 3 separate presentations on prescription opioids.

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and functional MRI (fMRI) are discussed regarding their applications to phenomena in addiction medicine. Following a description of the fMRI technique, imaging data will be presented showing brain changes associated with cognitive and affective mechanisms as an individual transitions to addiction. Links between the genetics of addiction and imaging data will be analyzed. Imaging correlates of smoking cues in smokers and their predictive validity to smoking cessation will be described. Discussion covers functional, structural and neurochemical evaluations of regions involved in cue-reactivity and craving. Discourse will also include neural substrates of cannabis abstinence and the implication of these findings to treatment development.

    Elliot A. Stein

    PhD

    Dr. Elliot Stein is Chief of the Neuroimaging Research Branch at the National Institute on Drug Abuse Intramural Research Program (NIDA-IRP). Prior to coming to NIDA in 2002, he was Professor of Psychiatry at the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW), where he was also Professor in the Departments of Pharmacology, Neurobiology and the Biophysics Research Institute. He received his PhD from the University of Maryland School of Medicine in neurophysiology and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the California Institute of Technology with James Olds, a pioneer in brain reward systems. His research program employs multimodal MR imaging to define those neuronal systems and circuits mediating the actions of abused drugs, to determine CNS sites and mechanisms responsible for mediating drug craving and reinforcement, and how drugs interact with specific cognitive processes to alter behavior. Most recently he has been examining the influence of various genetic polymorphisms on imaging biomarkers of addiction.

    Amy C. Janes

    PhD

    Dr. Janes directs the Functional Integration of Addiction Research Laboratory at Harvard Medical School's McLean Hospital. She received her PhD in 2007 from Boston University where her work focused on molecular mechanisms of cocaine dependence. After a term as a postdoctoral fellow at McLean Hospital, she was awarded a K01 to gain skills in clinical neuroimaging of nicotine dependence. She currently holds an R01 research grant to continue her line of inquiry into how reactivity to drug cues contribute to addiction. Broadly, her current work centers on using neuroimaging to meet three main goals: 1) identifying individual differences in vulnerability for developing and maintaining addictive disorders, 2) evaluating brain changes following treatment, and 3) understanding how cognitive, affective, and psychiatric disorders contribute to addiction. A primary focus of her lab is determining the impact of smoking-related cues on nicotine dependence and clarifying the neurobiological processes associated with heightened cue reactivity.

    Sarah W. Yip

    PhD

    Sarah W. Yip, PhD is an Associate Research Scientist in Psychiatry at Yale University's School of Medicince. Dr. Yip received her PhD in Psychiatry from the University of Oxford, where she received training in multimodal neuroimaging. Her work uses neuropsychiatric research methods to identify the biological mechanisms of psychiatric disorders with the long-term aim of improving treatments.

    Frank J. Vocci (Moderator)

    PhD

    Frank Vocci, PhD, President and Senior Research Scientist, Friends Research Institute, Baltimore, MD. Following a post-doctoral fellowship in addiction pharmacology at the Medical College of Virginia, Dr. Frank Vocci spent 11 years at the FDA, rising to the level of Chief of the Drug Abuse Staff. At the FDA, he reviewed applications for marketing of medications for analgesic medications and for the treatment of substance abuse disorders. He also participated in domestic and international drug control issues. In 1989, he joined the Medications Development Program at the National Institute on Drug Abuse. He became the Director of the Division of Pharmacotherapies and Medical Consequences of Drug Abuse (DPMC) in 1997 where he was responsible for overseeing research and development activities in medications development for the treatment of addictive disorders. He was also responsible for biomedical research in the medical consequences of drug abuse, primarily AIDS and hepatitis C research. During his tenure, the DPMC collaborated on the development of four addiction drug products that were approved by the FDA. Dr. Vocci has published over 100 articles in neuropharmacology and the treatment of substance abuse and its consequences. In 2001, he received a Meritorious Executive award from President Bush for his management of the NIDA medications development program. Dr. Vocci also received a Distinguished Service Award in 2003 from the College on Problems of Drug Dependence for his contributions to the development of buprenorphine as a treatment for opiate dependence. In 2006 Dr. Vocci received the Vernelle Fox award from the California Society of Addiction Medicine and the FeDerSerD (Italian Addiction Society) award. Dr. Vocci has been a co-editor of the Journal of Addiction Medicine since 2012 and is a past-president of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence.

  • New Pharmacotherapies for Alcohol & Substance Use Disorders (2 CME)

    Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Session 10 from The ASAM State of the Art Course in Addiction Medicine contains 3 separate presentations on pharmacotherapies.

    The current pharmacotherapies for managing Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) will be reviewed. Highlights include the development of new pharmacotherapies that modulate brain stress systems to prevent symptoms leading to relapse as an adjunct to behavioral therapy. Discussion will cover pharmacological management of AUD patients with liver disease. A review of recent findings in the management of Opioid Use Disorder and novel strategies to deliver buprenorphine is included.

    Barbara Mason

    PhD

    Barbara J. Mason, Ph.D. is the Pearson Family Professor, Director of the Pearson Center for Alcoholism and Addiction Research, Director of the Laboratory of Clinical Psychopharmacology, and Acting Chair of the Committee on the Neurobiology of Addictive Disorders at The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA. Dr. Mason's work in medication development for the treatment of alcohol use disorders has been recognized with a MERIT Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Dean's Senior Clinical Research Award from the University of Miami School of Medicine, and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Teacher-Scientist Award from Cornell University Medical College. Dr. Mason conducted the seminal studies identifying nalmefene as having therapeutic potential for alcohol dependence; nalmefene (Selincro) has recently received regulatory approval for the treatment of alcohol dependence in the European Union. Dr. Mason also served as overall Principal Investigator for the US multicenter trial of acamprosate (Campral) for the treatment of alcohol dependence which was conducted in support of FDA approval. Dr. Mason has served on the National Advisory Councils of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) and the National Advisory Council of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). Dr. Mason is an elected Fellow of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology and has held multiple editorial positions, including serving as a current member of the editorial board for the Journal of Addiction Medicine. Dr. Mason holds the Pearson Family Chair, an endowed position in alcohol and addiction research at The Scripps Research Institute, and is currently conducting a program of NIH-funded research that includes human laboratory studies to screen medications for therapeutic potential for alcohol dependence and clinical trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of novel medications for alcohol and cannabis dependence.

    Lorenzo Leggio

    MD. PhD, MSc

    Dr. Lorenzo Leggio serves as the Chief of the joint NIAAA/NIDA Section on Clinical Psychoneuroendocrinology and Neuropsychopharmacology. He received his M.D. and Ph.D. from the Catholic University of Rome, where he also completed residency and Board Certification in Internal Medicine. He received a Masters in Alcoholism from the University of Florence. He was a postdoctoral research associate in Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Brown University. In 2010, he became Assistant Professor at the Brown University Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies (CAAS). Dr. Leggio's clinical research has been primarily focused on the treatment of alcoholism, with an emphasis on the role of feeding-related and GABAergic pathways; and on the medical consequences of alcoholism, with an emphasis on alcoholic liver disease. While at Brown, he received funding from NIH and various foundations. In 2012, Dr. Leggio joined NIAAA and NIDA as a joint Clinical Investigator and Section Chief. He is licensed and credentialed as Senior Attending Medical Staff at the NIH Clinical Center. Dr. Leggio also serves as the Associate Director for Clinical Research for the NIDA IRP Medication Development Program. Additionally, he is an Adjunct Associate Professor at the Brown University CAAS. Dr. Leggio's lab has pioneered clinical research on the role of neuroendocrine signaling in alcoholism. He has authored or co-authored over 100 peer-reviewed manuscripts and has served as reviewer for NIH study sections and other U.S. and international funding agencies. He has served as consultant for FDA advisory panels, and on the editorial boards of addiction-related journals. He has served as Chair (Clinical) of the 2016 Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) Program Committee. Among other awards, he received the 2008 ESBRA Nordmann Award, the 2015 NIAAA Clinical Service Award, the 2016 NIAAA Mentoring Award, and the 2016 RSA Early Career Investigator Award

    Richard N. Rosenthal

    MD, FASAM

    Richard N. Rosenthal, MD, FASAM, is Professor of Psychiatry at Icahn Schoolof Medicine at Mount Sinai and Medical Director of Addiction Psychiatry for the Mount Sinai Behavioral Health System, responsible for constructing a coordinated system of evidence-based addiction treatment across multiple locations. He received his MD from SUNY Downstate Medical Center. Dr. Rosenthal is also Past President, a Distinguished Fellow and Head of Public Policy of the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry (AAAP), a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine. He has studied evaluation and treatment of addictive disorders amongst the chronic mentally ill, and been Principal Investigator on associated NIH-funded projects related to services for patients with co-occurring disorders, as well as PI or Co-PI on federally-funded and industry-funded projects related to genetic vulnerability, neuroimaging and pharmacologic treatment of addiction. He is committed to studying barriers to clinical integration of evidence-based addiction treatment, and creating replicable, evidence-based models to surmount them. Active in training, he directs the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai/St Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center Program in Addiction Psychiatry.

    Frank J. Vocci

    PhD

    Frank Vocci, PhD, President and Senior Research Scientist, Friends Research Institute, Baltimore, MD. Following a post-doctoral fellowship in addiction pharmacology at the Medical College of Virginia, Dr. Frank Vocci spent 11 years at the FDA, rising to the level of Chief of the Drug Abuse Staff. At the FDA, he reviewed applications for marketing of medications for analgesic medications and for the treatment of substance abuse disorders. He also participated in domestic and international drug control issues. In 1989, he joined the Medications Development Program at the National Institute on Drug Abuse. He became the Director of the Division of Pharmacotherapies and Medical Consequences of Drug Abuse (DPMC) in 1997 where he was responsible for overseeing research and development activities in medications development for the treatment of addictive disorders. He was also responsible for biomedical research in the medical consequences of drug abuse, primarily AIDS and hepatitis C research. During his tenure, the DPMC collaborated on the development of four addiction drug products that were approved by the FDA. Dr. Vocci has published over 100 articles in neuropharmacology and the treatment of substance abuse and its consequences. In 2001, he received a Meritorious Executive award from President Bush for his management of the NIDA medications development program. Dr. Vocci also received a Distinguished Service Award in 2003 from the College on Problems of Drug Dependence for his contributions to the development of buprenorphine as a treatment for opiate dependence. In 2006 Dr. Vocci received the Vernelle Fox award from the California Society of Addiction Medicine and the FeDerSerD (Italian Addiction Society) award. Dr. Vocci has been a co-editor of the Journal of Addiction Medicine since 2012 and is a past-president of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence.

    Raye Z. Litten (Moderator)

    PhD

    Dr. Litten is the Acting Director of the Division of Medications Development, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). Dr. Litten manages the NIAAA medications development program to treat alcohol use disorder (AUD). He oversees the development of medications for AUD that are efficacious and safe by translating neuroscience discoveries into lead compounds and advancing them through drug development pipeline. Finally, he also serves as the Project Officer for the NIAAA NCIG clinical trials program and served as Project Officer on the multi-site Phase 3 clinical trial COMBINE. Dr. Litten is the author of over 110 publications and co-editor of 9 books and journals.

  • NP/PA 24-Hour Waiver Training - AAPA

    Contains 2 Product(s)

    Free 24-hour CME education for physician assistants seeking to qualify for a waiver to prescribe buprenorphine in an office-based treatment setting.

    image

    ASAM, AAPA and AANP have formed a collaborative to provide the 24-hour waiver training for physician assistants and nurse practitioners. These three organizations are authorized by statute to provide this training. Educational content has been identified and/or created to satisfy the 24-hour requirement as described in the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA).


    To qualify, NPs and PAs must:

    • Be licensed under state law to prescribe schedule III, IV, or V medications for pain
    • Complete no less than 24 hours of appropriate education through a qualified provider or through other training or experience, demonstrate the ability to treat and manage OUD
    If required by state law, be supervised or work in collaboration with a qualifying physician to prescribe medications for the treatment of OUD

    **The content was originally developed for the 8-hour DATA2000 training for physicians. This content is now offered to NPs/PAs and appropriate provider language will be changed as content continues to evolve. 

    This training is presented in two parts. Part 1 is the 8-hour training for physicians, NPs and PAs. Part 2 is the additional 16 hours for NPs/PAs required by CARA. In Part 2, you will see the topics listed in CARA with specific content under those topics.

    If you have not already taken the 8-hour course, please begin with Part 1. If you have already taken the 8-hour course, you may begin with Part 2.

    Click the "Content" tab to get started!

    Click here to return to the main waiver training page on the ASAM e-Learning Center.

    The collaborative of ASAM, AAPA and AANP identified and reviewed this content to provide the NP/PA training required by CARA.

    The NP/PA 24-Hour Waiver Training is available for free through 2018 in part by an unrestricted educational grant from Indivior.

    The 16-hour product developed includes all additional education required by the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA) for physician assistants to successfully apply for a waiver to prescribe buprenorphine for office-based treatment of opioid use disorders.

    Download this helpful FAQ for technical issues.

    All other questions, contact ASAM Education.
    education@ASAM.org | 301.656.3920

    Please ensure that your state regulations allow you to prescribe buprenorphine and other medications to treat OUD before you apply for the waiver.  Some states may have overriding state legislation that will prevent NPs and PAs from prescribing these medications even if Federal law allows it.

    Apply

    SAMHSA reviews waiver applications within 45 business days of receipt. If approved, you will receive a letter via email that confirms your waiver and includes your prescribing identification number.

    Waiver applications are forwarded to the DEA. DEA regulations require your prescribing identification number to be included on all buprenorphine prescriptions for opioid dependency treatment, along with your regular DEA number.

    If you have not received confirmation of receipt of your application, or if it has been more than 45 business days since submitting it, contact CSAT by email: infobuprenorphine@samhsa.hhs.gov or call 866.287.2728.

    Qualify 

    To qualify for a waiver to treat patients with Opioid Use Disorder, NPs and PAs must: 

    • Be licensed under state law to prescribe schedule III, IV, or V medications for pain
    • Complete no less than 24 hours of appropriate education through a qualified provider or through other training or experience, demonstrate the ability to treat and manage OUD
    • If required by state law, be supervised or work in collaboration with a qualifying physician to prescribe medications for the treatment of OUD
  • Cannabinoids: Therapeutic Potentials & Medical Consequences (2.25 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 7 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Session 5 from The ASAM State of the Art Course in Addiction Medicine contains 4 separate presentations on cannabinoids

    Examine several topics in the field of cannabinoids. An update on cannabis legalization will be followed by a presentation on the role of medical caregivers dispensing information on cannabis, its effects and the unwanted effects of cannabinoid products. A discussion of synthetic cannabinoids, new psychoactive substances and the illegal market that has proliferated will follow. Discussion includes the evolving problems associated with this epidemic. For example, synthetic cannabinoids are not detected in conventional drug tests that assay for tetrahydrocannabinol, creating monitoring issues for criminal justice, highway safety and medical personnel treating individuals under the influence of synthetic cannabinoids. The last presentation reviews the current evidence of therapeutic potentials of cannabinoids and discusses efficacy outcome measures for possible clinical indications.

    Gregory C. Bunt

    MD, FASAM

    Dr. Gregory Bunt graduated from NYU School of Medicine in 1983, completed his residency in Psychiatry at the AECOM in 1987, and a Fellowship in Addiction Psychiatry at NYU (1989), and is currently as an Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at NYU. He is a diplomat of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology in Addiction Psychiatry. Dr. Bunt is currently the medical director of Daytop Village and consultant to Daytop International. Dr. Bunt also serves as the President of the New York Society of Addiction Medicine and the President-Elect of the International Society of Addiction Medicine as well. He has authored over a dozen publications, and speaks nationally and internationally on the subject of therapeutic communities.

    R. Jeffrey Goldsmith

    MD, DLFAPA, DFASAM

    Dr. Goldsmith began his addiction medicine career in 1974 as a medical student, learning about the disease of alcoholism as a counselor for one of the Department of Transportation's Alcohol Safety Action Projects. He received his medical training at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine from 1973-1977 and finished his residency in Psychiatry at UC in 1981.

    Recent Employment history

    In 1994 Dr. Goldsmith joined the VA fulltime. From 1994-2009, he split his time between Dual Diagnosis Services and other duties including all of the psychiatric consultations for the hospital (1994-1997) and research with the Clinical Trials Network (1995-2009). He was an active member of Cincinnati's NIDA research group, and Cincinnati's principal investigator for its pivotal study of buprenorphine/naloxone for opiate addiction. Dr Goldsmith also created an integrated Primary Care Mental Health program with the director of Primary Care, initiated in 2007 and still active.

    Currently Dr. Goldsmith works in the VA Buprenorphine Treatment Clinic.

    Teaching

    In 1994, Dr. Goldsmith developed an ACGME accredited Addiction Psychiatry Fellowship and the following year was funded by the Dept. of Veterans Affairs for a two year Addiction Medicine Fellowship. He holds the title of Professor of Clinical Psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience at the University of Cincinnati. He was addiction fellowship director from 1989 to 2007 and continues to teach in addiction fellowships: Psychiatry and ABAM.

    ASAM involvement

    Dr. Goldsmith joined ASAM in 1984, became ASAM certified in 1986 and got his CAQ in Addiction Psychiatry in 1994. He has been on the CME committee since then, and was its chair for nine years from 2000-2009. Dr Goldsmith is President of ASAM 2015-2017.

    Robert L. DuPont

    MD, DFASAM

    For more than 40 years, Robert L. DuPont, M.D. has been a leader in drug abuse prevention and treatment. He served as the first Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (1973-1978) and as the second White House Drug Chief (1973-1977). From 1968-1970 he was Director of Community Services for the District of Columbia Department of Corrections, heading parole and half-way house services. From 1970-1973, he served as Administrator of the District of Columbia Narcotics Treatment Administration. Following this distinguished public career, in 1978 Dr. DuPont became the founding president of the Institute for Behavior and Health, Inc., a non-profit organization that identifies and promotes new ideas to reduce illegal drug use. He has been Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the Georgetown University School of Medicine since 1980. 

    A graduate of Emory University, Dr. DuPont received an M.D. degree in 1963 from the Harvard Medical School. He completed his psychiatric training at Harvard and the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. 

    Dr. DuPont is a Life Fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. His activities in ASAM include chairing the forensic science committee from 1995 to 2004, and serving as Co-Chair of the two White Paper writing committees that produced The Role of the Physician in “Medical” Marijuana in 2010 and State-Level Proposals to Legalize Marijuana in 2012. He served as Chair of the writing committee that produced Drug Testing: A White Paper of the American Society of Addiction Medicine in 2013. He is also a Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and was chairman of the Drug Dependence Section of the World Psychiatric Association from 1974 to 1979. In 1989 he became a founding member of the Medical Review Officer Committee of ASAM."

    Jag Khalsa

    PhD, MS

    Dr. Jag Khalsa, with about 50 years of experience in drug research, serves as the Chief of the Medical Consequences Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, DHHS; is responsible for developing/administering a national and international program of clinical research on medical and health consequences of drug abuse and co-occurring infections (HIV, HCV, and others). Prior to joining NIDA in 1987, he served for ~10 yrs as a pharmacologist/toxicologist assessing safety (carcinogenic/teratogenic) potential of chemicals [INDs/NDAs] and food additives) and clinical evaluator at FDA. He has published in pharmacology, toxicology, epidemiology and medical journals. He serves on editorial boards of Journals of Addiction Medicine, Research on HIV/AIDS and Palliative Care, Frontiers of Neuroscience, and Clinical Infectious Diseases. He also serves on numerous Federal and NIH level committees including the HHS Viral Hepatitis Implementation Group (VHIG), National Commission on Digestive Diseases and its two sub-committees (Liver Research, Diabetes Research), Federal Task Force on TB, NIH Steering Committee on Centers for AIDS Research. He has received distinguished service awards from the FDA Commissioner, NIDA and NIH Directors, Society of Neuro-Immune-Pharmacology (SNIP), Life Time Achievement Awards from SNIP and International Conference on Molecular Medicine (India) and MIT, India; a commendation from the US Congress, Awards of Merit from the International Society of Addiction Medicine (ISAM), the President of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), and a Certificate of Appreciation from the Office of Assistant Secretary for Health (Drs. Howard Koh and Ron Valdiserri), DHHS. He has a Ph.D. in neuro-psycho-pharmacology, a Master's degree in herbal pharmacology/medicine, post-doctoral training in CNS/Cardiovascular pharmacology at SK&F, and Toxicology at SRI International. E-mail: jk98p@nih.gov

  • New Issues in Medical Co-Morbidities (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Session 7 from The ASAM State of the Art Course in Addiction Medicine contains 2 separate presentations on medical comorbidities.

    Injection drug users have high rates of co-occurring infectious diseases. The first presentation describes the public health problem of Hepatitis C infection, changing demographics of the infected population and ways to cure the infection in injection drug users. The possibility of reinfection in injection drug users and the challenge it presents, along with diagnosis and management of neurocognitive changes brought on by HIV/HCV co-infection in aging patients with substance use disorders will be discussed.

    David L. Thomas

    MD, MPH

    DAVID L. THOMAS, M.D., M.P.H., is Chief of Infectious Diseases and the Stanhope Bayne-Jones Professor of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Dr. Thomas is trained in internal medicine and infectious diseases and cares for patients with infectious diseases including chronic viral hepatitis. He also oversees clinical research projects whose aims are focused on understanding the natural history and pathogenesis of hepatitis C virus infection. Liver disease in HIV infected persons is a special area of clinical and research focus. He is the principal investigator on numerous National Institutes of Health grants and the author or co-author of over 200 peer-reviewed publications. Dr. Thomas has served the National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control, and IDSA in multiple capacities has won international recognition for his academic contributions.

    Ajay Bharti

    MD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of California San Diego

    Jag Khalsa (Moderator)

    PhD, MS

    Dr. Jag Khalsa, with about 50 years of experience in drug research, serves as the Chief of the Medical Consequences Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, DHHS; is responsible for developing/administering a national and international program of clinical research on medical and health consequences of drug abuse and co-occurring infections (HIV, HCV, and others). Prior to joining NIDA in 1987, he served for ~10 yrs as a pharmacologist/toxicologist assessing safety (carcinogenic/teratogenic) potential of chemicals [INDs/NDAs] and food additives) and clinical evaluator at FDA. He has published in pharmacology, toxicology, epidemiology and medical journals. He serves on editorial boards of Journals of Addiction Medicine, Research on HIV/AIDS and Palliative Care, Frontiers of Neuroscience, and Clinical Infectious Diseases. He also serves on numerous Federal and NIH level committees including the HHS Viral Hepatitis Implementation Group (VHIG), National Commission on Digestive Diseases and its two sub-committees (Liver Research, Diabetes Research), Federal Task Force on TB, NIH Steering Committee on Centers for AIDS Research. He has received distinguished service awards from the FDA Commissioner, NIDA and NIH Directors, Society of Neuro-Immune-Pharmacology (SNIP), Life Time Achievement Awards from SNIP and International Conference on Molecular Medicine (India) and MIT, India; a commendation from the US Congress, Awards of Merit from the International Society of Addiction Medicine (ISAM), the President of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), and a Certificate of Appreciation from the Office of Assistant Secretary for Health (Drs. Howard Koh and Ron Valdiserri), DHHS. He has a Ph.D. in neuro-psycho-pharmacology, a Master's degree in herbal pharmacology/medicine, post-doctoral training in CNS/Cardiovascular pharmacology at SK&F, and Toxicology at SRI International. E-mail: jk98p@nih.gov

  • Special Addresses and Open Discussion (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Federal Agencies address emerging issues and advances in addiction medicine.

    This session has been made available free of charge until 11/2/2017 by the American Society of Addiction Medicine. Federal Agencies address emerging issues and advances in addiction medicine.

    Kana Enomoto

    MA

    Ms. Enomoto has been delegated—by the Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia M Burwell—the functions, duties, and authorities of the Administrator to oversee an agency with four centers, four offices, over 600 employees, and a budget of $3.7 billion. Through data, policy, public education, and grants, Ms. Enomoto and the SAMHSA team advance the agency's mission to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America's communities. Ms. Enomoto has served as Principal Deputy Administrator and principal advisor to the SAMHSA Administrator on operations, policies, and programmatic activities for the agency since August 2011. Prior to that, Ms. Enomoto served as the Director of the Office of Policy, Planning, and Innovation, where she developed, coordinated, and communicated SAMHSA policies across the full spectrum of mental health and substance abuse issues. From 2005-2009, Ms. Enomoto served as the Principal Senior Advisor to three SAMHSA Administrators, and as the Acting Deputy Administrator between 2008 and 2009. She began her tenure at SAMHSA in 1998 as a Presidential Management Fellow. She began her career in research and clinical services with a focus on minority mental health and trauma. Ms. Enomoto has received awards in recognition of her work, including the Arthur S. Flemming Award, the American College of Mental Health Administration King Davis Award, and the Secretary's Award for Distinguished Service. Ms. Enomoto earned her bachelor's degree in psychology and master's degree in clinical psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles and is a graduate of Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government, Senior Managers in Government Program.

    George F. Koob

    PhD

    George F. Koob, PhD is Director of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism of the National Institutes of Health, Washington, DC. As an authority on alcoholism, drug addiction and stress, he has contributed to our understanding of the neurocircuitry associated with the acute reinforcing effects of alcohol and drugs of abuse and the neuroadaptations of the reward and stress circuits associated with the transition to dependence. Dr. Koob has published over 650 peer reviewed papers and several books including the “Neurobiology of Addiction," a comprehensive treatise on emerging research in the field. He has mentored 11 PhD students and over 75 post-doctoral fellows.

    Wilson Compton

    MD, MPE

    Dr. Wilson M. Compton serves as the Deputy Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) of the National Institutes of Health. In his current role, Dr. Compton's responsibilities include providing scientific leadership in the development, implementation, and management of NIDA's research portfolio and working with the Director to support and conduct research to improve the prevention and treatment of drug abuse and addiction. Prior to his current appointment, Dr. Compton served as the Director of NIDA's Division of Epidemiology, Services and Prevention Research from 2002 until 2013. In this leadership role, he oversaw the scientific direction of a complex public health research program of national and international scope addressing: 1) the extent and spread of drug abuse, 2) how to prevention drug abuse, and 3) how to implement drug abuse prevention and treatment services as effectively as possible. Before joining NIDA, Dr. Compton was Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Director of the Master in Psychiatric Epidemiology Program at Washington University in Saint Louis as well as Medical Director of Addiction Services at the Barnes-Jewish Hospital in Saint Louis. Dr. Compton received his undergraduate education from Amherst College. He attended medical school and completed his residency training in psychiatry at Washington University. During his career, Dr. Compton has achieved multiple scientific accomplishments: he was selected to serve as a member of the DSM-5 Revision Task Force; is the author of more than 130 articles and chapters; and is an invited speaker at multiple high-impact venues. Dr. Compton is the recipient of multiple awards and in 2008, he received the Senior Scholar Health Services Research Award from the American Psychiatric Association, in 2010 the Paul Hoch Award from the American Psychopathological Association, in both 2012 and 2013, he was selected to receive the Leveraging Collaboration Award from the Food and Drug Administration. In 2013, Dr. Compton received the prestigious Health and Human Services Secretary's Award for Meritorious Service.

    Frank J. Vocci (Moderator)

    PhD

    Frank Vocci, PhD, President and Senior Research Scientist, Friends Research Institute, Baltimore, MD. Following a post-doctoral fellowship in addiction pharmacology at the Medical College of Virginia, Dr. Frank Vocci spent 11 years at the FDA, rising to the level of Chief of the Drug Abuse Staff. At the FDA, he reviewed applications for marketing of medications for analgesic medications and for the treatment of substance abuse disorders. He also participated in domestic and international drug control issues. In 1989, he joined the Medications Development Program at the National Institute on Drug Abuse. He became the Director of the Division of Pharmacotherapies and Medical Consequences of Drug Abuse (DPMC) in 1997 where he was responsible for overseeing research and development activities in medications development for the treatment of addictive disorders. He was also responsible for biomedical research in the medical consequences of drug abuse, primarily AIDS and hepatitis C research. During his tenure, the DPMC collaborated on the development of four addiction drug products that were approved by the FDA. Dr. Vocci has published over 100 articles in neuropharmacology and the treatment of substance abuse and its consequences. In 2001, he received a Meritorious Executive award from President Bush for his management of the NIDA medications development program. Dr. Vocci also received a Distinguished Service Award in 2003 from the College on Problems of Drug Dependence for his contributions to the development of buprenorphine as a treatment for opiate dependence. In 2006 Dr. Vocci received the Vernelle Fox award from the California Society of Addiction Medicine and the FeDerSerD (Italian Addiction Society) award. Dr. Vocci has been a co-editor of the Journal of Addiction Medicine since 2012 and is a past-president of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence.

  • Healthcare Delivery: From ACA to Your Practice (2 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Session 3 from The ASAM State of the Art Course in Addiction Medicine contains 4 separate presentations on healthcare delivery.

    Discover CONTINUUMTM, a computer assisted clinical interview and ASAM Criteria decision engine designed to conform to Federal healthcare reform requirements. Understand the benefits of this program on patient flow, quality of care, revenues, staffing burden, prior authorization and staff morale. Focus will involve performance standards for physicians and how physicians can deliver quality health care while meeting the expectations of corporate and government entities. This will involve a description of conflicts created by 42 CFR Part 2 and electronic health records and accompanying rules governing private health information. Examine changes in regulation and law designed to balance quality healthcare delivery with protection of privacy of patients seeking treatment for substance use disorder.

    David Gastfriend

    MD, DFASAM

    David R. Gastfriend, MD, served on the faculty of Harvard Medical School for 25 years, most recently as Director of the Addiction Research Program at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). His studies of the Patient Placement Criteria published by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) have been supported by the NIH's National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, U.S. state governments, managed care corporations, including Aetna Behavioral Healthcare, and foreign governments, including Belgium, Finland, Iceland, Israel, Norway, Switzerland, and the World Health Organization. The author of over 125 scientific publications, he has served on the Boards and Editorial Boards of a number of societies and journals, including ASAM and the International Society of Addiction Medicine (ISAM). He is co-editor of the leading book on treatment matching in the field, The ASAM Patient Placement Criteria for Substance-Related Disorders and editor of Addiction Treatment Matching. In addition to his role at RecoverySearch, Dr. Gastfriend is also Vice President for Scientific Communications at Alkermes, Inc. (NASDAQ: ALKS) where he is involved in research, education and scientific publication on extended-release naltrexone (VIVITROL®) and the company's efforts in the field of addiction treatment.

    Michael M. Miller

    MD, LFAPA, DFASAM

    Michael M. Miller, MD, DFASAM, LFAPA, is the medical director of the Herrington Recovery Center at Rogers Memorial Hospital in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin. He is a board-certified general psychiatrist and addiction psychiatrist. Dr. Miller has practiced addiction medicine for more than 30 years and is certified in addiction medicine by the American Board of Addiction Medicine. He is a Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) and a Distinguished Fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM). Dr. Miller is also an at-large director of the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) and The ABAM Foundation, as well as a past president of ASAM. Dr. Miller has served on many task forces and councils of ASAM and the Wisconsin Medical Society (WMS), was chair of the WMS Commission on Addictive Diseases, and is current Speaker of the WMS House of Delegates and a member of the Society's Board of Directors. He serves as a faculty member for the Addiction Psychiatry Fellowship and the Addiction Medicine Fellowship at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, where he is a Clinical Adjunct Professor. He also is an assistant clinical professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Dr. Miller was named the national physician Clinician of the Year by Addiction Professional magazine in 2011. He was the recipient of The ASAM Award in 2013.. Through 2015, he chaired the Steering Committee of ASAM's Practice Improvement and Performance Measurement Action Group. In June 2014, Dr. Miller was elected by the AMA House of Delegates to a four year term on the AMA Council on Science and Public Health.

    Eric Goplerud

    PhD, MA

    Eric Goplerud is a senior fellow and vice president with NORC at the University of Chicago. Goplerud, who joined NORC in 2011, is a clinical psychologist and an expert on substance abuse treatment and prevention who was previously a senior research professor at George Washington University focusing on behavioral health policy. Prior to working at George Washington University, he held several senior policy leadership positions at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Since 2002, Goplerud has directed Ensuring Solutions to Alcohol Problems, a research program at George Washington University supported by grants from the Pew Charitable Trusts, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, industry, and various federal agencies. He also directs the Center for Integrated Behavioral Health Policy. Goplerud is immediate past president of ACMHA: the College for Behavioral Health Leadership. His primary work focuses on integration of behavioral health into national health reform, improving access and financing for behavioral health in primary and specialty medicine, and engagement of businesses, health insurers, and employee assistance programs to promote access to effective, affordable behavioral health care. Goplerud has directed foundation, corporate, and government-sponsored projects focused on increasing access to effective, affordable alcohol treatment. In addition, Goplerud chaired the National Quality Forum's Technical Advisory Panel that produced the consensus standards of evidence-based substance use treatment, and he co-chairs the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations (JCAHO) Technical Advisory Panel that designed and is field testing alcohol and tobacco SBIRT performance measures for all hospital admissions.

  • Guidelines for Treating Substance Use Disorders (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Session 4 from The ASAM State of the Art Course in Addiction Medicine contains 3 separate presentations on guidelines for treating SUD.

    Gain an overview of the development and recommendations of The ASAM National Practice Guideline for the Use of Medications in the Treatment of Addiction Involving Opioid Use. Understand initiatives being implemented by the Department of Health and Human Services in response to the nation's opioid overdose crisis. Also explore the national and international guidelines that address treatment needs of women in the perinatal period.

    Kyle M. Kampman

    MD

    Dr. Kyle Kampman graduated from Northwestern University in 1981 and Tulane University School of Medicine in 1985. He interned at the National Naval Medical Center at Bethesda Maryland and served in the United States Navy from 1985 until 1990. He came to the University of Pennsylvania and served as a resident in psychiatry from 1990 until 1993. He then completed a fellowship in Addiction Psychiatry. In 1994 he joined the faculty in the Department of Psychiatry as an assistant professor. He was promoted to associate professor in 2003 and to professor in 2012. Dr. Kampman has had extensive experience in the treatment of alcohol cocaine and opiate dependence. He has conducted a number of trials testing medications for the treatment of cocaine alcohol and opiate dependence and is a recognized authority on the cocaine withdrawal syndrome. In addition to research, he works at the Addiction Recovery Unit of the Philadelphia VA Medical Center where he continues to treat cocaine, alcohol and opiate dependent patients with both medications and psychotherapy.

    Jennifer Fan

    PharmD, JD

    CAPT Jennifer Fan is currently the Special Assistant to the Director of the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP) in the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). She is also the Co-lead for SAMHSA's Strategic Initiative: Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention. Prior to her role as Special Assistant, CAPT Fan worked in the Division of Workplace Programs overseeing the Federal Drug-Free Workplace Program and was a Public Health Advisor in SAMHSA's Division of Pharmacologic Therapies in CSAT overseeing the NASPER grants for prescription drug monitoring programs as well as working on SAMHSA's Prescriber Education Courses and the compliance of opioid treatment programs. She has also worked in FDA's Office of Generic Drugs; Office of Drug Safety; and the Division of Drug Marketing, Advertising, and Communications as well as CMS' Part B Reimbursement. CAPT Fan received her PharmD from the University of Maryland and her JD from the University of Baltimore.

    Karol Kaltenbach

    PhD

    Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior; Director; Maternal Addiction Treatment, Education and Research; Department of Pediatrics, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA Dr. Karol Kaltenbach is the Director of Maternal Addiction Treatment, Education and Research (MATER), a division of the Department of Pediatrics, Jefferson Medical College. MATER includes “Family Center", a comprehensive intensive outpatient treatment program for pregnant and parenting opioid dependent women; “My Sister's Place", a long-term residential treatment program for women and children; and a research component. Family Center has provided the prototype both nationally and internationally for the management of opioid dependency during pregnancy and the treatment of neonatal abstinence. She is a member of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence and has been the Principle Investigator of grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. She is currently a Principal Investigator of the NIDA MOTHER clinical trial comparing the use of buprenorphine and methadone in the treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy and is a co-investigator of a NIDA funded trial investigating the use of buprenorphine in the treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Dr. Kaltenbach is an internationally recognized expert in the field of maternal addiction and has published extensively on the management of opioid dependence during pregnancy and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS); gender specific treatment for pregnant and parenting substance abusing women; and the effect of prenatal drug exposure on the perinatal and developmental outcome of children. She has lectured throughout the world and has participated in the development of national guidelines for the management of opioid dependent pregnant women and their neonates in Australia and Norway.

    Frank J. Vocci (Moderator)

    PhD

    Frank Vocci, PhD, President and Senior Research Scientist, Friends Research Institute, Baltimore, MD. Following a post-doctoral fellowship in addiction pharmacology at the Medical College of Virginia, Dr. Frank Vocci spent 11 years at the FDA, rising to the level of Chief of the Drug Abuse Staff. At the FDA, he reviewed applications for marketing of medications for analgesic medications and for the treatment of substance abuse disorders. He also participated in domestic and international drug control issues. In 1989, he joined the Medications Development Program at the National Institute on Drug Abuse. He became the Director of the Division of Pharmacotherapies and Medical Consequences of Drug Abuse (DPMC) in 1997 where he was responsible for overseeing research and development activities in medications development for the treatment of addictive disorders. He was also responsible for biomedical research in the medical consequences of drug abuse, primarily AIDS and hepatitis C research. During his tenure, the DPMC collaborated on the development of four addiction drug products that were approved by the FDA. Dr. Vocci has published over 100 articles in neuropharmacology and the treatment of substance abuse and its consequences. In 2001, he received a Meritorious Executive award from President Bush for his management of the NIDA medications development program. Dr. Vocci also received a Distinguished Service Award in 2003 from the College on Problems of Drug Dependence for his contributions to the development of buprenorphine as a treatment for opiate dependence. In 2006 Dr. Vocci received the Vernelle Fox award from the California Society of Addiction Medicine and the FeDerSerD (Italian Addiction Society) award. Dr. Vocci has been a co-editor of the Journal of Addiction Medicine since 2012 and is a past-president of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence.