Catalog Advanced Search

Search by Categories
Search in Packages
Search by Format
Search by Type
Search by Date Range
Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
Start
End
Search by Keyword
Sort By
  • Using PMP's and SBIRT to Address Physician Controlled Drug Prescribing (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The prudent prescribing of controlled drugs has been a challenge for decades. Balancing prescribing for legitimate medical purpose while avoiding prescribing in high risk situations has been one of the most difficult aspects to address. This is partly due to suboptimal screening for high risk patients by prescribers prior to and during chronic controlled drug prescribing. The development of US Prescription Monitoring Programs has brought about the clinical expectation that Substance Abuse Treatment Programs (SATPs) will perform a PMP web-site search on all patients evaluated for problematic substance use.

    The prudent prescribing of controlled drugs has been a challenge for decades. Balancing prescribing for legitimate medical purpose while avoiding prescribing in high risk situations has been one of the most difficult aspects to address. This is partly due to suboptimal screening for high risk patients by prescribers prior to and during chronic controlled drug prescribing. It is also due to inadequate attention to the seriousness of the relative contraindications to long term controlled drug prescribing including current or past substance use disorder on the part of the patient. The development of US Prescription Monitoring Programs has brought about the clinical expectation that Substance Abuse Treatment Programs (SATPs) will perform a PMP web-site search on all patients evaluated for problematic substance use. This technology now provides SATPs with large amounts of information about their patient's sources of controlled drugs. What has not been common is a systematic evidence based approach to using this new data from PMP profiles. We have implemented a "Reverse - SBIRT" approach to communicate with controlled drug prescribers who appear on substance abusing patient's PMP profiles. The Screening in this reverse approach involves using PMP reports to screen for prescribers who are currently prescribing controlled drugs to high risk patients. The Brief Intervention consists of notifying these prescribers of their patients high risk status and the necessity of factoring this information into future prescribing decisions. The Referral to Treatment in this approach involves the possible referral of the prescriber for evaluation by his or her licensure board for remedial education in the prescribing of controlled drugs if the prescribing pattern appears intractable or egregious.

    Theodore V. Parran

    MD, FACP, FASAM

    Dr. Ted Parran is a 1978 graduate with honors in History from Kenyon College and a 1982 graduate from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.  He completed a residency in Internal Medicine at the Baltimore City Hospital of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Following his residency, Dr. Parran was selected to be the Medical Chief Resident.  In 1987, he received the Outstanding Faculty Teacher Award from the Department of Medicine.  In 1988 he returned to Cleveland and CWRU School of Medicine.  

    Dr. Parran pursues several areas of special interest in medical education including Doctor – Patient Communication, Faculty Development, Continuing Medical Education, and Addiction Medicine.  
    In addition, Dr. Parran is board certified in Internal medicine and Addiction Medicine, and his group practice provides medical directorship services to several Substance Abuse treatment programs in northeast Ohio.  He is widely published and has been an invited speaker at national and international conferences for the past two and a half decades.  
    He established the Addiction Fellowship Program at CWRU School of Medicine in 1994, teaches on the Addiction Psychiatry Fellowship faculty and co-directs the current Addiction Medicine Fellowship Program at St. Vincent charity Hospital.  Dr. Parran is the co-director of the Foundations of Clinical Medicine Course, a course with topics which touch on the doctor patient relationship, health disparities, professionalism, cultural competence and health policy.  He is the medical director of the Program in Continuing Medical Education, and in 2007 was named as the Isabel and Carter Wang Professor and Chair in Medical Education, all at CWRU School of Medicine. 

  • Substance Withdrawal in Pregnancy: From Research to Practice to Public Health (2 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Jim Walsh and Vania Rudolf will address challenges and practical considerations for OAT and summarize its benefits for maternal and neonatal outcomes when compared to medication assisted withdrawal management.

    Substance use in pregnancy is a major, often underdiagnosed health problem for women, regardless of age, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status, and has resulting high costs for individuals and society. Early identification and timely treatment improves maternal and neonatal outcomes. Current evidence supports opioid agonist therapy (OAT) as a safe, effective modality for pregnant and parenting women with opioid use disorder. However, due to barriers to accessing care, lack of provider skill, geographical patterns, and marked socio-economic disparities, only a minority receive OAT. In addition, punitive attitudes and health policies have the potential to lead to under-treatment and social marginalization. Providing clinical recommendations and developing safe guidelines to improve care for pregnant women with substance use disorders and their children is gaining in priority for programming, policy and research. The panel will discuss how to treat women with substance use disorders during pregnancy and provide practical approaches for evidence-based management of opioid and sedative use disorder. Perinatal, neonatal, public health and research perspectives will be condensed, with the aim to translate data into a practical clinical guide. Mishka Terplan will discuss treatment through a public health lens highlighting gaps between evidence-based practice and the actual landscape of care. Hendree Jones will provide research data on evidence-based practices for treating pregnant women with opioid use disorder (OUD). Tricia Wright will present a longitudinal perspective and clinical guide for managing pregnant and parenting women on OAT, including women with co-occurring alcohol and sedative use. Jim Walsh and Vania Rudolf will address challenges and practical considerations for OAT and summarize its benefits for maternal and neonatal outcomes when compared to medication assisted withdrawal management.

    Mishka Terplan

    MD, MPH, FACOG, FASAM

    Mishka Terplan is a physician boarded in both obstetrics and gynecology and addiction medicine. His clinical, research and advocacy work focuses on the intersection of reproductive health and addictions. He is currently Medical Director of Behavioral Health System Baltimore, the local behavioral health authority, adjunct faculty at University of Maryland Department Epidemiology and Public Health, and staff physician at Planned Parenthood Maryland. He has represented both the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) on federal taskforces and in testimony including before the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee regarding H.R. 1462, the “Protecting Our Infants Act".

    Tricia Wright

    MD, MS, FACOG, FASAM

    Tricia Wright, MD MS is an assistant professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women's Health at the University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine and founder, former medical director, and now Women's Health Liaison of the PATH Clinic, an outreach clinic of Waikiki Health Center, which provides prenatal, postpartum and family planning to women with a history of substance use disorders. She is board certified in both Ob/Gyn and Addiction Medicine and a Fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. She has been waivered to provide buprenorphine since 2009, and has treated both pregnant and non-pregnant women. She won funding approval in 2006 from the Hawaii legislature to start a perinatal clinic for women with substance use, the first in the state. The Path Clinic opened in 2007, and has seen over 400 pregnant women since that time. She completed her Masters Degree in Clinical Research from the University of Hawaii in 2009, her thesis paper studying the disparities of smoking and drug use rates during pregnancy of Native Hawaiian women. Her research interests include substance use disorders among pregnant women, including barriers to family planning, screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT), best practices for treatment, and the effects of methamphetamine, marijuana and tobacco on the placenta.

    Hendree Jones

    PhD

    Hendree Jones, PhD is a Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and Executive Director of Horizons, a comprehensive drug treatment program for pregnant and parenting women and their drug-exposed children. She is also an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Psychology, UNC, Chapel Hill and an Adjunct Professor in the Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University. 

    Dr. Jones is an internationally recognized expert in the development and examination of both behavioral and pharmacologic treatments for pregnant women and their children in risky life situations. Dr. Jones has received continuous funding from the United States National Institutes of Health since 1994 and has published over 185 publications, two books on treating substance use disorders (one for pregnant and parenting women and the other for a more general population of patients), numerous book and textbook chapters. She is a consultant for SAMHSA, the United Nations and the World Health Organization. 

    Dr. Jones leads or is involved in projects in Afghanistan, the South America, the Republic of Georgia, South Africa, and the United States which are focused on improving the lives of children, women and families.

    Jim Walsh

    MD

    Dr. Walsh attended medical school at SUNY Downstate and completed family medicine residency training at Montefiore in the Bronx in 1998.  He worked as a primary care provider at a Community Health Center for 7 years before completing fellowships in Addiction Medicine and High Risk Pregnancy Management. Since then he has worked at the Addiction Recovery Service at Swedish Medical Center in Seattle, becoming Medical Director of the Service in 2006.

    At Swedish we provide prenatal care and delivery services, as well as inpatient rehabilitation and opiate maintenance treatment for pregnant women with substance use problems.  We also offer inpatient medically managed withdrawal and addiction medicine outpatient services for patients who aren't pregnant.   We have been training physicians in addiction medicine since 2002.  Our fellowship program was accredited by ABAM in 2014.

    Vania Rudolf

    MD, MPH, FASAM

    Dr. Rudolf is board certified in addiction medicine and family medicine. She received her medical degree from Sofia Medical University and completed residency in family medicine with high risk obstetrics at Tacoma Family Medicine, UW Family Medicine Residency Network. She pursued further public health education at the University of WA and has completed fellowships in Integrative Medicine at University of AZ, Addiction Medicine at Swedish Medical Center, Seattle and most recently Advanced Obstetrics Fellowship under Maternal Fetal Medicine at Swedish Medical Center, Seattle, WA. Clinically she provides specialty inpatient and outpatient services to pregnant women with substance use disorders. Her ultimate professional goal is to positively impact the lives of patients with addiction, with emphasis on public health clinical outcomes and social justice.Her research efforts are dedicated to promotion of compassionate care, elimination of treatment barriers, diminishing stigmatization, and building innovative frameworks for both healthcare providers and patients.

  • Marijuana: From Bench to Policy (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    There are controversies regarding marijuana in the development of current public policy in the United States through legalization and/or decriminalization of medical marijuana and recreational marijuana throughout the nation, and worldwide as well. Informed addiction physicians are best qualified to opine, advise and advocate for improved public policy regarding marijuana use, access and promotion. This symposium will provide opinion survey data of ASAM and ISAM physicians. Overall perspectives from highly qualified scientists and professionals related to the impact of marijuana policies on individuals, families and communities in diverse cultural settings will be presented.

    https://www.surveymonkey.com/r... There are controversies regarding marijuana in the development of current public policy in the United States through legalization and/or decriminalization of medical marijuana and recreational marijuana throughout the nation and worldwide as well. Informed addiction physicians are best qualified to opine, advise and advocate for improved public policy regarding marijuana use, access and promotion. This symposium will provide opinion survey data of ASAM and ISAM physicians focusing on five critical areas: (i) potential adverse effects of marijuana use/abuse including data on the addictive potential, toxicity and gateway effect; (ii) the more specific effects of cannabis use on vulnerable populations including youth (i.e. adolescents and young adults), those individuals with mental illness, and those with abuse/addiction histories with alcohol or other drugs; (iii) potential therapeutic clinically appropriate indications for prescribed cannabinoids including crude marijuana and approved cannabinoid related medications; (iv) public policies defining legalization and/or decriminalization of medical marijuana and recreational marijuana; and finally (v) medical professional guidelines and/or position papers regarding the legalization and/or decriminalization of medical marijuana and recreational marijuana. A comparative analysis of models of regulated or unregulated legalization or decriminalization of medicinal or recreational marijuana will be included as the California model, the New York model, the Holland model, and the Colorado model. More current proposals for regulated access to marijuana including the Canadian will be described. Varying perspectives from highly qualified scientists and professionals related to the impact of marijuana policies on individuals, families and communities in diverse cultural settings will be discussed.

    Marc Galanter

    MD, DFASAM

    Marc Galanter, M.D., is a Professor of Psychiatry at NYU, Founding Director of the Division of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse, a Senior Editor of the Journal “Substance Abuse,” and co-editor of the American Psychiatric Association's “Textbook of Substance Abuse Treatment.” He has written four books, “Cults: Faith, Healing, and Coercion,” “Network Therapy for Alcohol and Drug Abuse,” “Spirituality and the Healthy Mind,” and "What is Alcoholics Anonymous?", and published over 200 peer-reviewed articles. His NIH and foundation-funded studies have addressed network therapy for substance abuse, pharmacologic treatment for addiction, the psychology of Twelve-Step recovery, and spirituality in healthcare.

    Dr. Galanter attended Albert Einstein College of Medicine where he did his residency in psychiatry. After that he was a Clinical Associate of the National Institute of Mental Health, then an NIH Career Teacher. He later served as President of the Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA, 1976-1977), the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry (AAAP, 1991-1992), and the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM, 1999-2001). Among his awards are the Gold Achievement Award for Innovation in Clinical Care, the Oskar Pfister Award for Spirituality, Religion and Psychiatry, and the Seymour Vestermark Award for Psychiatric Education, all from the American Psychiatric Association; the McGovern Award for Medical teaching from AMERSA; the Smithers Award for Research form ASAM; and New York State's Award for Psychiatric Research.

    Ben Cort

    MS

    Ben’s passion for recovery, prevention and harm reduction comes from his own struggle with substance abuse. Sober since 6/15/96, Ben has been a part of the recovery community in almost every way imaginable; from a recipient to a provider to a spokesperson Cort has a deep understanding of the issues and a personal motivation to see the harmful effects of drug and alcohol abuse minimized.In 2007 Ben left his position as a HR director inside of a Denver based S&P 500 firm to help start the Colorado based nonprofit, Phoenix Multisport (PM). As an original board member and then their first full time employee, Ben was instrumental in building this organization that has received frequent national recognition for their innovative approach to building sober communities around sport and healthy activities. Ben joined the drug policy conversation at the national level in 2012 after leaving PM to be a part of the “No on 64” Campaign. Following the passage of A64 he has been appointed to the Board of Directors of Project SAM (Smart Approaches to Marijuana) As well as NALGAP (the National Association of Lesbian, Gay, and Transgender Treatment Providers and their Allies). Ben’s passion about the intersection of recovery and public policy makes him frequent guest in the media.His first book, Stirring the Pot – A book about weed, published by HCI is due out in 2017. Ben resigned from his position with the University of Colorado Hospital inside of their chemical dependency treatment service line in January 2017 to focus on marijuana education and consulting inside of the substance use disorder treatment field. 

    Robert L. DuPont

    MD, DFASAM

    For more than 40 years, Robert L. DuPont, M.D. has been a leader in drug abuse prevention and treatment. He served as the first Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (1973-1978) and as the second White House Drug Chief (1973-1977). From 1968-1970 he was Director of Community Services for the District of Columbia Department of Corrections, heading parole and half-way house services. From 1970-1973, he served as Administrator of the District of Columbia Narcotics Treatment Administration. Following this distinguished public career, in 1978 Dr. DuPont became the founding president of the Institute for Behavior and Health, Inc., a non-profit organization that identifies and promotes new ideas to reduce illegal drug use. He has been Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the Georgetown University School of Medicine since 1980. 

    A graduate of Emory University, Dr. DuPont received an M.D. degree in 1963 from the Harvard Medical School. He completed his psychiatric training at Harvard and the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. 

    Dr. DuPont is a Life Fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. His activities in ASAM include chairing the forensic science committee from 1995 to 2004, and serving as Co-Chair of the two White Paper writing committees that produced The Role of the Physician in “Medical” Marijuana in 2010 and State-Level Proposals to Legalize Marijuana in 2012. He served as Chair of the writing committee that produced Drug Testing: A White Paper of the American Society of Addiction Medicine in 2013. He is also a Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and was chairman of the Drug Dependence Section of the World Psychiatric Association from 1974 to 1979. In 1989 he became a founding member of the Medical Review Officer Committee of ASAM."

    Gregory C. Bunt

    MD, FASAM

    Dr. Gregory Bunt graduated from NYU School of Medicine in 1983, completed his residency in Psychiatry at the AECOM in 1987, and a Fellowship in Addiction Psychiatry at NYU (1989), and is currently as an Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at NYU. He is a diplomat of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology in Addiction Psychiatry. Dr. Bunt is currently the medical director of Daytop Village and consultant to Daytop International. Dr. Bunt also serves as the President of the New York Society of Addiction Medicine and the President-Elect of the International Society of Addiction Medicine as well. He has authored over a dozen publications, and speaks nationally and internationally on the subject of therapeutic communities.

    Jag Khalsa

    PhD, MS

    Dr. Jag Khalsa, with about 50 years of experience in drug research, serves as the Chief of the Medical Consequences Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, DHHS; is responsible for developing/administering a national and international program of clinical research on medical and health consequences of drug abuse and co-occurring infections (HIV, HCV, and others). Prior to joining NIDA in 1987, he served for ~10 yrs as a pharmacologist/toxicologist assessing safety (carcinogenic/teratogenic) potential of chemicals [INDs/NDAs] and food additives) and clinical evaluator at FDA. He has published in pharmacology, toxicology, epidemiology and medical journals. He serves on editorial boards of Journals of Addiction Medicine, Research on HIV/AIDS and Palliative Care, Frontiers of Neuroscience, and Clinical Infectious Diseases. He also serves on numerous Federal and NIH level committees including the HHS Viral Hepatitis Implementation Group (VHIG), National Commission on Digestive Diseases and its two sub-committees (Liver Research, Diabetes Research), Federal Task Force on TB, NIH Steering Committee on Centers for AIDS Research. He has received distinguished service awards from the FDA Commissioner, NIDA and NIH Directors, Society of Neuro-Immune-Pharmacology (SNIP), Life Time Achievement Awards from SNIP and International Conference on Molecular Medicine (India) and MIT, India; a commendation from the US Congress, Awards of Merit from the International Society of Addiction Medicine (ISAM), the President of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), and a Certificate of Appreciation from the Office of Assistant Secretary for Health (Drs. Howard Koh and Ron Valdiserri), DHHS. He has a Ph.D. in neuro-psycho-pharmacology, a Master's degree in herbal pharmacology/medicine, post-doctoral training in CNS/Cardiovascular pharmacology at SK&F, and Toxicology at SRI International. E-mail: jk98p@nih.gov

  • Overview of Addiction Medicine, 2016-2017: A Rapid Review (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This is a rapid-fire, journal club presentation reviewing high impact publications in the field from 2016-2017, organized by the core chapters of the ASAM Principles of Addiction Medicine textbook.

    This session is an annual review of the highest impact peer-reviewed articles from our field for 2016-2017. This symposium organizes brief journal club-type presentations using the chapter outline of ASAM's Principles of Addiction Medicine text: neurobiology, epidemiology, pharmacology, intoxication and withdrawal syndromes, screening and diagnosis, mutual help, harm reduction, criminal justice, dual diagnoses, and pharmacologic and behavioral interventions. The goal of this symposium is to provide the learner with a concise, structured, and evidence-based summary of the most recent scientific evidence. All of the core Principles chapters are covered, using the highest rated (impact, reach) articles on these topics. Articles are selected by relevance to the topic outline, publication metrics (journal impact factor, most downloaded, Altmetric rankings), and expert opinion. Example articles include the 2016 CDC chronic pain and opioid guidelines, a randomized controlled trial of buprenorphine + XR-naltrexone for cocaine use, the impact of the DEA rescheduling of hydrocodone products, and epidemiologic findings in a national sample of associations between cannabis use and downstream mood and other substance use disorders.

    Sarah Wakeman

    MD, FASAM

    Sarah E. Wakeman, MD is the Medical Director for the Mass General Hospital Substance Use Disorder Initiative, program director of the Mass General Addiction Medicine fellowship, and an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. She is also the Medical Director of the Mass General Hospital Addiction Consult Team, co-chair of the Mass General Opioid Task Force, and clinical lead of the Partners Healthcare Substance Use Disorder Initiative. She is the Medical Director of RIZE Massachusetts, a state-wide, private sector initiative created to build a $50 million fund to implement and evaluate innovative interventions to address the opioid overdose crisis. She received her A.B. from Brown University and her M.D. from Brown Medical School. She completed residency training in internal medicine and served as Chief Medical Resident at Mass General Hospital. She is a diplomate and fellow of the American Board of Addiction Medicine. She is chair of the policy committee for the Massachusetts Society of Addiction Medicine. She served on Massachusetts' Governor Baker’s Opioid Addiction Working Group. Nationally, she is chair of the American Society of Addiction Medicine Drug Court Task Force and serves on their ethics committee.Clinically she provides specialty addiction and general medical care in the inpatient and outpatient setting at Mass General Hospital and the Mass General Charlestown Health Center. Her research interests include evaluating models for integrated substance use disorder treatment in medical settings, recovery coaching, physician attitudes and practice related to substance use disorder, and screening for substance use in primary care.

    Joshua D. Lee

    MD, MSc, FASAM

    Joshua D. Lee MD, MSc is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Population Health and Medicine at the NYU School of Medicine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Addiction Medicine and is a physician at Bellevue Hospital Center, NYU Langone Medical Center, and in the NYC jails. He directs the NYU ABAM Fellowship in Addiction Medicine. His research focuses on novel and medication treatments for addiction among criminal justice and primary care populations.

  • Ethical Issues in Addiction Medicine- Case Based Dilemmas (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Ethical issues abound in caring for patients with addiction, with clinical dilemmas related to difficult patients, manipulative behavior, refusal of care and legal issues. The workshop will briefly review the ethical principles of Autonomy, Beneficence, Non-maleficence, Justice, Fidelity and Futility. The understanding of these terms will serve as the basis of case based discussions.

    Ethical issues abound in caring for patients with addiction, with clinical dilemmas related to difficult patients, manipulative behavior, refusal of care and legal issues. The workshop will briefly review the ethical principles of Autonomy, Beneficence, Non-maleficence, Justice, Fidelity and Futility. The understanding of these terms will serve as the basis of case based discussions. There will be six patient scenarios (touching on varied clinical dilemmas) presented. Each case will be presented briefly and then the audience will break up into small groups to discuss and come up with an answer (there may not be only one right answer). Each group will briefly report its answer. There will also be an opportunity for participants to present their own patient care dilemmas that pose ethical questions. The hope is that the session will validate participants unease in caring for patients in certain situations and help build clinical confidence, by gaining skill in being able to make decisions in clinical situations using an ethical framework.

    Michael Fingerhood

    MD, FACP

    Dr. Michael Fingerhood is an Associate Professor of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University. He is the Chief of the Division of Chemical Dependence and medical director of the Comprehensive Care Practice (CCP) at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The CCP integrates substance abuse treatment with primary medical care, including care for HIV and hepatitis C.

  • Hepatitis C Screening, Education, and Treatment Program for People Who Use Drugs (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This workshop will examine unique models of interdisciplinary HCV care delivery tailored to different clinical settings where persons who use drugs may present including: primary care, opioid treatment programs, syringe exchanges, and safety net programs for the homeless. We will review basics of treatment models after which we will hold an interactive session where small groups will review pertinent cases.

    The public health burden of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) among people who use drugs (PWUD) is enormous. Worldwide, about 10 million PWUD have been infected with HCV; however, under 10% of HCV-infected PWUD have initiated treatment for HCV. With the advent of all oral, well tolerated treatment for HCV, or direct acting antivirals (DAA), we now have the ability to make a significant impact on this large disease burden, specifically among PWUD. However, this can best be achieved by focusing on HCV prevention and treatment among PWUDs, key drivers of the HCV epidemic. Some of the barriers to treating HCV among PWUD include limited access to treatment, concerns for ongoing substance use, potential for reinfection after treatment, and stigma. Successful HCV treatment and cure in this crucial population must be a public health priority and depends on innovative models of care that integrate drug treatment with HCV treatment. The objectives of this workshop are to examine unique models of interdisciplinary HCV care delivery tailored to different clinical settings where PWUD present including: primary care, opioid treatment programs, syringe exchanges, and safety net programs for the homeless. After brief faculty introductions and overview of unique treatment models, interdisciplinary session participants will separate into faculty-facilitated small groups to engage in a case-based card game where each participant is assigned a specific role (physician, nurse, social worker, pharmacist, navigator). Next, each group will be assigned a case patient with various demographic and clinical characteristics which may complicate treatment paradigms (i.e., homelessness, ongoing substance use, various HCV genotypes, stage of liver fibrosis or cirrhosis, HIV co-infection, etc). Then participants will draw cards from a "resource card deck" (syringe access program, access to rapid HCV testing with reflex RNA and genotype, methadone clinic access, MAT access, supportive family, housing, primary care provider, DOT services) and a "challenges card deck" (lack of knowledge about HCV, stigma against PWUD, medication prior authorization rejected, patient relapse, lost meds, jailed, new dx HCC, Medicaid restrictions, etc). The object of the game is to develop a treatment plan to cure the patient of HCV and reduce ongoing risk. Bonus points will be assigned to groups which develop a system to eradicate HCV from your community.

    Jenna Butner

    MD

    Jenna Butner is clinical instructor of internal medicine at Yale School of Medicine. She completed her residency training in family medicine at Albert Einstein Yeshiva University. She went on to complete a palliative care and hospice medicine fellowship at Mount Sinai Beth Israel Medical Center, and completed an addiction medicine fellowship at Yale School of Medicine. Her primary interests include treating substance use disorders and treating hepatitis C and HIV in those with substance use disorders.

    Jeanette M. Tetrault

    MD, FACP, FASAM

    Dr. Tetrault’s scholarly work focuses on care of patients with addicition and the medical co-morbidities associated with substance use, mainly HIV and Hepatitis C. She is a diplomate of the American Board of Addiction Medicine. Dr. Tetrault is a physician providing primary care and buprenorphine/naloxone treatment at the Central Medical Unit of the APT Foundation, a multi-specialty addiction treatment facility, and is an attending physician at Yale New Haven Hospital (YNHH). She is the co-director of the Addiction Recovery Clinic in the Adult Primary Care Clinic at the St. Raphael's Campus of YNHH, which serves both a clinical care and a teaching mission. She was selected as a Macy Foundation Faculty Scholar in 2017. She is the Program Director for the Yale Addiction Medicine Fellowship Program and serves on the Board of Directors for The Addiction Medicine Foundation and the Addiction Medicine Fellowship Directors Association. She is a past-president of the New England Region of SGIM and co-chair of the Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use Interest Group for SGIM.

    Lamia Haque

    MD, MPH

    Lamia Y. Haque, MD, MPH is an addiction medicine fellow at Yale University in collaboration with the APT Foundation, a multi-specialty addiction treatment facility. She completed her internal medicine training in the Yale Primary Care Residency Program. She is a recipient of the Next Generation Award for Adolescent Substance Use Prevention sponsored by the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation and is working to enhance SBIRT delivery in school-based health centers. She has been involved in multiple educational efforts such as organizing trainee-led shared medical appointments for veterans who are prescribed opioids for chronic pain, providing training for medical students and residents through the SAMHSA-funded Medical Health Professional Training SBIRT Program at Yale, and engaging in global health education and capacity-building at a rural primary care center in West Kalimantan, Indonesia through the support of the Johnson and Johnson Global Health Scholars Program. She has had a variety of research experience, ranging from assessing social determinants of cancer treatment among underinsured immigrants through a Gold Foundation for Humanism in Medicine Research Fellowship to delineating national trends in opioid use in hospitalized patients with cirrhosis. Under the mentorship of her program director Jeanette M. Tetrault, MD, FACP, FASAM, she is exploring the epidemiology, treatment, and prevention of substance use disorders and addiction-related comorbidities including chronic hepatitis C infection and decompensated cirrhosis. She plans to seek additional training in gastroenterology and transplant hepatology with the aim of exploring the role of integrated addiction treatment in these subspecialty settings, and hopes to devote her clinical and academic work toward the development of models of care for patients with substance use disorders and chronic illnesses.

    Colleen S. Lynch

    MD, MPH

    Colleen S. Lynch, MD, MPH is the current Medical Director of Care Coordination for the San Francisco Health Network (SFHN), the clinical arm of the San Francisco Department of Public Health. She acts as co-lead of the Primary Care Based Hepatitis C treatment initiative at the SFHN, and is responsable for oversight of the Complex Care Management teams and the post-discharge transitions work in primary care. She also supervises Internal Medicine residents at the University of California San Francisco during their outpatient clincial time. Through her work on the hepatitis C treatment initiative, she has trained and collaborated with multidisciplinary providers across sites including primary care clinics, methadone treatment centers, needle exchange programs, and shelder programs. This work has helped to expand access to hepatitis C treatment for patients throughout the safety net in San Francisco.

    Colleen completed her residency training in Internal Medicine and Primary Care in 2012 at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). She completed her National Research Service Award Fellowship within the Division of General Internal Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York, and received her MPH degree with a focus in outcomes research through the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in May of 2015. During her fellowship, her research focus was on patient attitudes toward hepatitis C treatment, and on evaluation of unique models of care for complex patients. She collaborated with the hepatitis C treatment clinic at Mount Sinai and the New York Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on hepatitis C related programming, and has been treating hepatitis C in the primary care setting since 2014. 

    Anna Shmayenik

    PharmD

    Anna Shmayenik, PharmD, is a Pharmacist at Cedra Pharmacy.

  • Integrative Health and Addiction Medicine: Treating the Whole Person (1.5 CME)

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    An interactive workshop that will introduce Integrative Addiction Medicine by giving a context for this whole person treatment approach, and providing a 'sampler' of clinical approaches that will include: nutrition, mindfulness, supplements, sleep and CAM case examples. Some of the evidence-base will be presented. This workshop will include interactive tools that will be practiced within the workshop, time for discussion, and will end with participants creating their own practice-change action plan.

    Dr Abramowitz will run this 90 minute interactive workshop. She has been active in CSAM's educational committee, as chair, vice-chair and on the planning committee of several CSAM conferences. She is an experienced medical educator in addiction medicine and is a long-time motivational interviewing trainer. She is both an integrative medicine fellow and faculty member. She is author of the chapter on Mindfulness in ASAM's forthcoming book on chronic pain and opioids. Part 1: Introductions --Pair off- 'Summarization Exercise' to hear why learners are here Part 2: Introduce the concept of 'Integrative Addiction Medicine' --How 'one pill for every ill' led to the chronic pain-opioid crisis and the need for a whole person health model of care --12-step tradition and its integration of spirituality into recovery --SUD patients (often due to suffering adverse childhood events) suffer with a high rate of chronic metabolic and cardiovascular conditions. --Lifestyle changes required for SUD recovery can be an entry into whole health recovery. --Why addiction medicine can better serve patients by practicing whole person health informed by the principles of integrative medicine Part 3: Review how to do a simple Integrative addiction medicine assessment --Review a practice-ready intake form --Teach & practice brief MI tool: 'A Typical Day', for nutritional & chronic pain assessment Part 4: Nutritional principles & supplements and early recovery --Introduce diet, health and recovery principles --Brief alcohol and vitamin deficiencies evidence review --Give example of NAC, a supplement that may be useful in recovery Part 5: Exercise & recovery --Evidence review --Teach & practice engagement tool for exercise, 'brief action planning' Part 6: Sleep & recovery --Evidence for non-pharmacological approaches to sleep problems in recovery --Teach how to use 'Menu of Choices' to engage in sleep hygiene Part 7: Mindfulness/Relaxation practices & recovery --Review evidence of usefulness in recovery --Teach and practice a simple mindfulness practice that can be taught in the office Part 8: Integrating learning into practice --Questions, answers and discussion --Pair off and create a practice change action plan based on what has been learned Note: didactics will be presented in mostly a case-based form

    Sharone Abramowitz

    MD, FASAM

    Sharone Abramowitz MD, FASAM is a psychiatrist & ABAM addiction medicine specialist; Behavioral & Addiction Medicine Dir. and Premed Student Health Coach Project Founder, Internal Medicine Residency, Alameda Health System; Faculty & Student, Interprofessional Fellowship Integrative Health & Medicine, AIHM, OHSU; and Member, Motiviational Interviewing Network of Trainers. She also has a private practice in Northern California and is the founder of Abramowitz Healthy Communicating. Additionally, she is on the CSAM executive council and chaired past CSAM annual conferences. Publications include: Bodenheimer T, Abramowitz S, Helping Patients Help Themselves: How to Implement Self-Management Support, California Healthcare Foundation, 2010; Abramowitz S, Flattery D, Franses K, Berry L, Linking a motivational Interviewing Curriculum to the Chronic Care Model, J Gen Intern Med 2010; Abramowitz S, Emphasizing Self-Management Support and Skills in Health Behavior Change Counseling in Motivational Interviewing: Principles and Practical Applications, Oakstone Practical Reviews 2016; and she authored the chapter on Mindfulness in ASAM's forthcoming book on chronic pain and opioids.

  • Medication Assisted Therapy for Drug Court (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This presentation will provide an overview of how the state courts are structured, discuss in-depth how drug and other specialty court programs work, and explore strategies for building partnerships between the courts and the medical community (specifically with the use of MAT).

    In 2011, the National Association of Drug Court Professionals (NADCP) made a series of resolutions on Medication Assisted Therapy (MAT) that includes distinct requirements for court professionals and substance abuse treatment providers to (1) learn about MAT, (2) obtain expert consultation on the appropriate use of MAT and (3) forbid blanket prohibitions against the use of MAT for their participants. Despite this, only 44% of courts nationwide are using MAT. Consequently, there are great opportunities for addiction medicine physicians to partner with local drug courts to deliver high quality MAT services. This presentation will provide an overview of how the state courts are structured, discuss in-depth how drug and other specialty court programs work, and explore strategies for building partnerships between the courts and the medical community (specifically the use of MAT). Participants will leave with a general understanding of the function of different types of state courts (e.g. district, circuit, probate) and how court ordered probation works. Drug courts, an intensive form of probation, will be discussed in-depth so participants understand how the programs work and what makes them unique in the criminal justice and behavioral health systems. Finally, conversation will be with audience members to understand how partnerships can be formed and how to navigate legal barriers (e.g. confidentiality, liability, funding) between the courts and medical providers. In conclusion, this workshop will provide a broad overview of the courts, in-depth understanding of drug courts, and give audience members the skills to help them effectively interact with Drug Courts and an understanding of the current legal landscape around MAT in drug courts.

    Cara Poland

    MD, MEd

    Cara Poland, MD, M.Ed was trained in internal medicine at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital in Ann Arbor, Michigan and in addiction medicine at Boston Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts. She has an interest in education physicians and physicians-in-training to improve care for patients with substance abuse and alcohol disorders. She is interested in medical student curriculum development and assessment, student well-being and identifying ways to improve the process of medical training. She sits on the Board of Directors for the Red Project and multiple leadership boards of various professional societies such as the Midwest Society of General Internal Medicine and American Society of Addiction Medicine. She is currently a physician at Spectrum Health's Center for Integrative Medicine.

    Andy Brown

    MPA, MSW

    Andrew Brown is the Drug Court Coordinator for the 20th Judicial Circuit Court in Ottawa County, Michigan.  He has served in this position for seven years and holds Masters Degrees in Public Administration and Social Work and is a Certified Court Manager through the National Center for State Courts.  His drug court is currently recognized as one of nine national mentor courts in the United States by the US Department of Justice and the National Association of Drug Court Professionals.  Andrew has a strong desire to build constructive working relationships with between the courts and community partners who serve our common clientele.

  • Be A Guiding Light: A Special Performance and Session (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Be inspired by a live performance by Joseph Green and recorded performances and brief interviews from young people whose lives are touched by addiction.

    This engaging session is led by Opening Plenary presenter Joseph Green, spoken word artist, educator, and motivational speaker. Be inspired by a live performance by Joseph Green and recorded performances and brief interviews from young people whose lives are touched by addiction. In the fight for prevention, treatment, and recovery, one of the most profound obstacles is the negative stigma lingering from the days when substance use disorder was treated as a moral failing rather than a disease. Through the power of spoken word poetry, humanity and dignity can be restored to a space that has been denied such for far too long.

    Joseph Green

    Joseph Green is a spoken word artist, educator, and motivational speaker.  Over the past 10 years Joseph’s passion for youth development has led to him supporting young people in a multitude of facets.  He the co-founder and former Program Manager of poetryN.O.W., an after school creative writing program that worked with students throughout the DC metropolitan area.  After five years of successful programming, poetryN.O.W. was acquired by Split This Rock, a Washington DC based poetry and social justice organization, where Joseph now supervises youth programs in over 25 high schools.  In his work with poetryN.O.W. and Split This Rock, Joseph has also crafted an extensive creative writing curriculum now used in classrooms throughout the country.

    In his prevention work with high schooled aged youth, Joseph facilitates interactive workshops to create transformational original poems on the effects that substance abuse and addiction has had on their lives. By empowering students to speak truth to power, Joseph has provided opportunities for them to share their stories with policy makers at the White House for the US Office of National Drug Control Policy and the US Department of Education. In his role as Program Manager at the Mentor Foundation USA, Joseph led the effort to revamp the interactive drug prevention youth rally known as Shattering the Myths.  As part of this initiative, he also served as host for the three day program that included a full day of writing workshops and leadership training.
    2015 marked Joseph’s fifth return to Poetry Slam International’s national slam, this time as a representative of the DC Poetry Slam Team. He represented the Oneonta slam team in 2005 and 2006 as their Grand Slam Champion, Slam Richmond in 2009, and DC’s Beltway Poetry Slam team in 2011. He also represented DC in 2011 at the Individual Poetry Slam, ranking 16th in the world. As a solo artist, Joseph has performed, hosted, and featured at venues and schools throughout the United States, including the White House and Kennedy Center. He has over ten years experience as a professional spoken word artist and writer.
    Joseph believes in the power of using lived experiences to catalyze positive personal change, and often pulls from his own unique set of experiences to engage groups of all ages and backgrounds. In 2012 he started the interactive performance series, Dive Every Day Project, with the intent of opening dialogue around the topic of substance use disorder, addiction, and recovery. The Dive Every Day Project pulls from a catalog of original work dealing directly with these issues, drawing from personal and family experiences. Dive Every Day serves to be a tool of inspiration and guidance for all who encounter it and is a testament to self-forgiveness, redemption, and the irreplaceable role of love in the human revolution.

  • Opening Scientific Plenary & Distinguished Scientist Lecture (2 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The opening session will focus on the dawn of a new day in addiction medicine with an exciting lineup of ASAM award winners and luminaries in the field.

    Joseph Green A Beacon of Hope: There Are No Lost Causes As a spoken word artist, motivational speaker, and activist for the recovery community, Joseph Green uses poetry interwoven with storytelling to share his battle with addiction and subsequent recovery to deliver a message of inspiration to people who have chosen careers in prevention, intervention, and treatment. Using his own story, Joseph reconnects his audience to the source of their motivation, reminding them that, as important as it is to know what we are fighting against, it is more important to remember what we are fighting for Patrice Harris, MD, MA Sparking Change: The Providers' Role in Combatting the Opioid Crisis Prescription opioid misuse, overdose and death continues to be one of our nation's most complex and challenging public health threats. The American Medical Association and its partner organizations on the Task Force to Reduce Opioid Abuse are working to reverse the epidemic through physician leadership. These efforts include urging physicians to use Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs, enhancing physician education, increasing access to treatment for substance use disorders, promoting comprehensive pain care, including non-opioid and non-pharmacologic care, expanding access to the life-saving drug naloxone, and strengthening state Good Samaritan protections for bystanders who intervene to help overdose patients. As chair of the Task Force, and Board Chair at the AMA, Dr. Patrice Harris will examine key data and policy trends at state and national levels, discuss their effectiveness, and highlight specific efforts still needed to reverse the nation's opioid epidemic. Barbara Mason, PhD Shedding New Light on an Old Problem: Novel Treatments for Alcohol Use Disorder Recent advances in our understanding of the neurobiology of alcohol use disorder can serve as the basis for the development of novel pharmacotherapies. Specifically, the activation of brain stress systems in early abstinence offers pharmacological targets that can be restored to a homeostatic range of functioning and thereby support recovery. Results from clinical trials of novel medications in this domain will be presented, with implications for clinical practice. Vice Admiral Vivek H. Murthy, MD, MBA Facing Addiction: Shining a Spotlight on America's Most Pressing Public Health Issue In his 2016 breakthrough report, US Surgeon General Murthy showed the nation the ubiquitous reach of substance use and addiction in this country. Using staggering data, he defined the public health impact of substance misuse, but also illustrated the tremendous impact that resonates throughout every community. Vice Admiral Vivek H. Murthy will discuss what led to the release of this landmark publication, what the country's next steps will be, and why there is still reason to hope.

    Joseph Green

    Joseph Green is a spoken word artist, educator, and motivational speaker.  Over the past 10 years Joseph’s passion for youth development has led to him supporting young people in a multitude of facets.  He the co-founder and former Program Manager of poetryN.O.W., an after school creative writing program that worked with students throughout the DC metropolitan area.  After five years of successful programming, poetryN.O.W. was acquired by Split This Rock, a Washington DC based poetry and social justice organization, where Joseph now supervises youth programs in over 25 high schools.  In his work with poetryN.O.W. and Split This Rock, Joseph has also crafted an extensive creative writing curriculum now used in classrooms throughout the country.

    In his prevention work with high schooled aged youth, Joseph facilitates interactive workshops to create transformational original poems on the effects that substance abuse and addiction has had on their lives. By empowering students to speak truth to power, Joseph has provided opportunities for them to share their stories with policy makers at the White House for the US Office of National Drug Control Policy and the US Department of Education. In his role as Program Manager at the Mentor Foundation USA, Joseph led the effort to revamp the interactive drug prevention youth rally known as Shattering the Myths.  As part of this initiative, he also served as host for the three day program that included a full day of writing workshops and leadership training.
    2015 marked Joseph’s fifth return to Poetry Slam International’s national slam, this time as a representative of the DC Poetry Slam Team. He represented the Oneonta slam team in 2005 and 2006 as their Grand Slam Champion, Slam Richmond in 2009, and DC’s Beltway Poetry Slam team in 2011. He also represented DC in 2011 at the Individual Poetry Slam, ranking 16th in the world. As a solo artist, Joseph has performed, hosted, and featured at venues and schools throughout the United States, including the White House and Kennedy Center. He has over ten years experience as a professional spoken word artist and writer.
    Joseph believes in the power of using lived experiences to catalyze positive personal change, and often pulls from his own unique set of experiences to engage groups of all ages and backgrounds. In 2012 he started the interactive performance series, Dive Every Day Project, with the intent of opening dialogue around the topic of substance use disorder, addiction, and recovery. The Dive Every Day Project pulls from a catalog of original work dealing directly with these issues, drawing from personal and family experiences. Dive Every Day serves to be a tool of inspiration and guidance for all who encounter it and is a testament to self-forgiveness, redemption, and the irreplaceable role of love in the human revolution.

    Patrice A. Harris

    MD, MA

    Dr. Patrice Harris, a psychiatrist from Atlanta, is chair of the American Medical Association’s (AMA) Board of Trustees.

    Active in organized medicine her entire career, Dr. Harris has held many leadership positions at both the national and state level.  In addition to serving on the AMA’s Board of Trustees since 2011, Dr. Harris previously served as chair of the AMA’s Council on Legislation, and on the boards of the American Psychiatric Association and the Georgia Psychiatric Physicians Association.
    As past director of Health Services for Fulton County, Georgia, which includes Atlanta, Dr. Harris oversaw all county health-related programs and functions, and spearheaded the county’s efforts to integrate public health, behavioral health and primary care services.
    Governing themes in Dr. Harris’ professional life are a passion to improve the lives of children and service to others, and she has worked for children both clinically and in the advocacy arena.
    A key focus for Dr. Harris currently is developing solutions to end the nation’s opioid epidemic.  She is chair of the AMA’s Task Force to Reduce Opioid Abuse, which brings together specialty and state medical societies and other health care associations to move swiftly to implement best practices to combat the opioid epidemic and save lives.

    Barbara Mason

    PhD

    Barbara J. Mason, Ph.D. is the Pearson Family Professor, Director of the Pearson Center for Alcoholism and Addiction Research, Director of the Laboratory of Clinical Psychopharmacology, and Acting Chair of the Committee on the Neurobiology of Addictive Disorders at The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA. Dr. Mason's work in medication development for the treatment of alcohol use disorders has been recognized with a MERIT Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Dean's Senior Clinical Research Award from the University of Miami School of Medicine, and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Teacher-Scientist Award from Cornell University Medical College. Dr. Mason conducted the seminal studies identifying nalmefene as having therapeutic potential for alcohol dependence; nalmefene (Selincro) has recently received regulatory approval for the treatment of alcohol dependence in the European Union. Dr. Mason also served as overall Principal Investigator for the US multicenter trial of acamprosate (Campral) for the treatment of alcohol dependence which was conducted in support of FDA approval. Dr. Mason has served on the National Advisory Councils of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) and the National Advisory Council of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). Dr. Mason is an elected Fellow of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology and has held multiple editorial positions, including serving as a current member of the editorial board for the Journal of Addiction Medicine. Dr. Mason holds the Pearson Family Chair, an endowed position in alcohol and addiction research at The Scripps Research Institute, and is currently conducting a program of NIH-funded research that includes human laboratory studies to screen medications for therapeutic potential for alcohol dependence and clinical trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of novel medications for alcohol and cannabis dependence.

    Vivek H. Murthy

    Vice Admiral, MD, MBA

    Vice Admiral (VADM) Vivek H. Murthy, M.D., M.B.A., was nominated by President Barack Obama in November 2013 and confirmed on December 15, 2014 as the 19th United States Surgeon General. As America’s Doctor, Dr. Murthy is responsible for communicating the best available scientific information to the public regarding ways to improve personal health and the health of the nation. He also oversees the operations of the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) Commissioned Corps, comprised of approximately 6,700 uniformed health officers who serve in locations around the world to promote, protect, and advance the health and safety of our nation. 

    Dr. Murthy has devoted himself to improving public health through the lens of service, clinical care, research, education, and entrepreneurship. The son of immigrants from India, Dr. Murthy discovered a love for the art of healing early in his childhood while spending time in his father’s medical clinic in Miami, Florida. After attending Miami Palmetto Senior High School, he received his Bachelor’s degree from Harvard, and his M.D. and M.B.A. degrees from Yale. He completed his residency training at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School where he later joined the faculty as an internal medicine physician and instructor. As a clinician-educator, Dr. Murthy has cared for thousands of patients and trained hundreds of residents and medical students. He regards caring for patients as the greatest privilege of his life.  
    In addition to clinical practice, Dr. Murthy has two decades of experience and perspective improving health in communities across the country and around the world. He co-founded VISIONS, an HIV/AIDS education program in India and the United States, which he led for eight years. As its president, he established ten chapters with hundreds of volunteers in both countries and grew the organization’s education programs to reach more than 45,000 youth. Dr. Murthy also co-founded the Swasthya project (“health and wellbeing” in Sanskrit), a community health partnership in rural India, to train women to be health providers and educators. During his five-year tenure with the organization, he established seed funding and helped expand research and direct care programs that reached tens of thousands of rural residents.
    As a research scientist, Dr. Murthy has conducted laboratory research on vaccine development and studied the participation of women and minorities in clinical trials. His research findings have been published in Science, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Murthy is also a healthcare entrepreneur and innovator. He co-founded and chaired a successful software technology company, TrialNetworks, which improves research collaboration and enhances the efficiency of clinical trials around the world. In seven years, Dr. Murthy and his team took the company from conception to an international enterprise that powers dozens of clinical trials for over 50,000 patients in more than 75 countries. Dr. Murthy has also served as the president of Doctors for America, a non-profit organization with more than 16,000 physicians and medical students in all 50 states who work with patients and policymakers to build a high quality, affordable health system for all.
    Seen by many as a proven leader who can use 21st century approaches and technology to modernize the role of Surgeon General, Dr. Murthy will focus his efforts on building cross-sector partnerships in communities to address the epidemics of obesity and tobacco-related disease, to reduce the stigma associated with mental illness, to improve vaccination rates, and to make prevention and health promotion the backbone of our communities. Dr. Murthy firmly believes that our nation's greatest strength has always come from its people. Improving the health of our people means strengthening our communities and our country. That will be Dr. Murthy’s highest priority as Surgeon General.