Catalog Advanced Search

Search by Categories
Search in Packages
Search by Format
Search by Type
Search by Date Range
Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
Start
End
Search by Keyword
Sort By
  • Opening Scientific Plenary & Distinguished Scientist Lecture (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    The ASAM 47th Annual Conference begins with the exciting Opening Scientific Plenary. Led by ASAM President R. Jeffrey Goldsmith, MD, DLFAPA, DFASAM, the Opening Scientific Plenary features an exciting lineup of ASAM award winners and leaders in the addiction medicine field: Nora Volkow, MD; William Miller, PhD; Governor Peter Shumlin (D-VT)

    The ASAM 47th Annual Conference begins with the exciting Opening Scientific Plenary. Led by ASAM President R. Jeffrey Goldsmith, MD, DLFAPA, DFASAM, the Opening Scientific Plenary features an exciting lineup of ASAM award winners and leaders in the addiction medicine field.

    Nora Volkow, MD Director, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Special Guest 

    The Opioid Crisis: What Can We Do To Curtail It? — Opioid use and its often tragic consequences have dramatically increased in recent years. This presentation will highlight ongoing efforts to help fill this treatment gap and to curtail this serious opioid epidemic in a number of ways. 

    Note: Please see the handouts tab for Dr. Volkow's updated slides and comments.

    William Miller, PhD R. Brinkley Smithers Distinguished Scientist Award Winner

    The Power of Empathy in Addiction Treatment — Whatever the content of treatment, therapeutic relationship continues to be a strong predictor of patient outcomes. Drawing on a range of clinical research across four decades, Dr. Miller will describe the therapeutic quality of accurate empathy as an important, learnable, and evidence-based component of effective treatment.

    Governor Peter ShumlinGovernor of Vermont, Special Guest

    Confronting America's Addiction to Opioids: A State Prescription for Identifying and Addressing the Crisis — In 2014, Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin devoted his State of the State proposal to battle opioid and heroin addiction. Since then, his state has expanded drug treatment and pre-trial risk-assessment programs to provide Vermonters with help to beat their addiction while combating a statewide epidemic.

    Nora Volkow, MD

    Director, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health

    Nora D. Volkow, M.D., became Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) at the National Institutes of Health in May 2003. Her work has been instrumental in demonstrating that drug addiction is a disease of the human brain. She pioneered the use of brain imaging to investigate the toxic effects and addictive properties of abusable drugs and has also made important contributions to the neurobiology of obesity, ADHD, and aging.

    Dr. Volkow was born in Mexico, earned her medical degree from the National University of Mexico, and carried out her psychiatric residency at New York University. Prior to her tenure at NIDA she held leadership positions at the Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory including Director of Nuclear Medicine, Chairman of the Medical Department, and Associate Director for Life Sciences. She was also a professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Associate Dean of the Medical School at the State University of New York (SUNY)-Stony Brook.

    Dr. Volkow has published more than 600 scientific articles and edited three books on neuroimaging for mental and addictive disorders. Among her many awards have been selection for membership in the Institute of Medicine, and the International Prize from the French Institute of Health and Medical Research. She was also named one of Time Magazine's “Top 100 People Who Shape our World", included as “One of the 20 People to Watch" by Newsweek magazine, and named “Innovator of the year" by U.S. News & World Report in 2000.

    William Miller, PhD

    Emeritus Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry, University of New Mexico

    Dr. William R. Miller is Emeritus Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of New Mexico where he served as Director of Clinical Training for the doctoral program in clinical psychology and as Co-Director of the Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse and Addictions (CASAA). Dr. Miller's publications include over 50 books and 400 articles and chapters including the original 1983 description of the clinical method of motivational interviewing. Fundamentally interested in the psychology of change, he has focused in particular on the development, testing, and dissemination of behavioral treatments for addictions. With more than 40 years of experience in addiction research and treatment, he has served as principal investigator for numerous research grants and contracts, founded a private practice group, directed a large public treatment program, and served as a consultant to many organizations including the United States Senate, the World Health Organization, the National Academy of Sciences, and the National Institutes of Health. In recognition of his research contributions, Dr. Miller is a recipient of the international Jellinek Memorial Award, two career achievement awards from the American Psychological Association, and an Innovators in Combating Substance Abuse award from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. He maintains an active interest in the interface of spirituality and psychology. His books have been translated into 26 languages and the Institute for Scientific Information has listed him as one of the world's most cited scientists.

    Governor Peter Shumlin

    Governor of Vermont

    Peter Shumlin is a small business owner, public servant and father of two from Putney, Vermont.

    As Governor, Peter is determined to get tough things done. Since his inauguration, he has been working hard to create jobs for those who need them and raise incomes for those who have jobs, control skyrocketing health care costs, expand broadband and cell service to every corner of the state, reduce recidivism, invest in quality education opportunities, and rebuild our roads and bridges. Taken together, these and other key goals represent an ambitious agenda to create a brighter economic future for Vermonters.

    Peter is the father of two daughters, Olivia and Rebecca. In his free time he enjoys running, hiking and cross country skiing. He likes to fish, hunt and garden and can sometimes be found spreading manure and cutting hay at his farm.

    Peter is the 81st Governor of Vermont.

  • Clinical Guidance for Treating Opioid-Dependent Pregnant and Parenting Women and Their Babies (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 credits while learning how practitioners treating opioid-dependent pregnant and parenting women and their children lack clear recommendations on how to care for this population, and clinical evidence is still limited. The panel will discuss how the recommendations for treating opioid-dependent pregnant and parenting women and their children will be translated into a practical clinical guide.

    Practitioners treating opioid-dependent pregnant and parenting women and their children lack clear recommendations on how to care for this population, and clinical evidence is still limited. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) convened a national expert panel and implemented the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method (RAM) to assess the appropriateness of clinical procedures to treat this population and provide clinical recommendations. Recommendations were derived from a literature review of evidence-based practices (EBPs) and clinical judgment deemed appropriate and applicable for a variety of settings. Using the RAM results, the panel will discuss areas of agreement for the appropriateness of certain procedures to improve the care of opioid-dependent pregnant and parenting women and their children, as well as areas where EBPs are not available and clinical judgment is not agreed on. The panel will discuss how the recommendations for treating opioid-dependent pregnant and parenting women and their children will be translated into a practical clinical guide. Audience members will be invited to provide their perspectives on areas where questions remain on appropriate clinical treatment.

    Hendree Jones, PhD

    Professor of OB/GYN and Executive Director Horizons Program, UNC School of Medicine

    Hendree Jones, PhD is a Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and Executive Director of Horizons, a comprehensive drug treatment program for pregnant and parenting women and their drug-exposed children. She is also an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Psychology, UNC, Chapel Hill and an Adjunct Professor in the Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Jones is an internationally recognized expert in the development and examination of both behavioral and pharmacologic treatments for pregnant women and their children in risky life situations. Dr. Jones has received continuous funding from the United States National Institutes of Health since 1994 and has published over 160 publications, two books on treating substance use disorders (one for pregnant and parenting women and the other for a more general population of patients), several book and textbook chapters. She is a consultant for the United Nations and the World Health Organization. Dr. Jones leads or is involved in projects in Afghanistan, the Southern Cone, the Republic of Georgia, South Africa, and the United States which are focused on improving the lives of children, women and families.

    Melinda Campopiano, MD

    Medical Officer, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

    Dr. Melinda Campopiano currently serves as Medical Officer for the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment at the Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). She is a physician Board Certified in Family Medicine with additional credentialing in Addiction Medicine.

    Dr. Campopiano has worked in both primary care and addiction medicine including managing programs and patients using methadone and buprenorphine. Prior to joining SAMHSA, she participated in the development, implementations and evaluation of a curriculum in SBIRT for medical students and residents at the Pennsylvania Department of Health Bureau of Drug and Alcohol Programs.

    Diana Coffa

    MD

    Dr. Coffa is the Residency Program Director for the Family and Community Medicine Residency program at the University of California, San Francisco. in addition to practicing full spectrum primary care, Dr. Coffa co-leads an addiction consultation clinic and directs the chronic pain programs at the Family Health Center, an FQHC teaching clinic. She oversees the clinic's buprenorphine program and ensures that residents in family medicine, internal medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics, and psychiatry have access to buprenorphine training. She is also the primary consultant for buprenorphine prescribing at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, providing clinical guidance to hospital and maternal care providers who are treating hospitlalized patients for opioid use disorder.

    Mishka Terplan

    MD, MPH, FACOG, FASAM

    Mishka Terplan is a physician boarded in both obstetrics and gynecology and addiction medicine. His clinical, research and advocacy work focuses on the intersection of reproductive health and addictions. He is currently Medical Director of Behavioral Health System Baltimore, the local behavioral health authority, adjunct faculty at University of Maryland Department Epidemiology and Public Health, and staff physician at Planned Parenthood Maryland. He has represented both the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) on federal taskforces and in testimony including before the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee regarding H.R. 1462, the “Protecting Our Infants Act".

    Stephen Patrick, MD, MPH, MS

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Health Policy, Division of Neonatology / Vanderbilt University

    Stephen W. Patrick, MD, MPH, MS, is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Health Policy at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and an attending neonatologist at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt. He is a graduate of the University of Florida, Florida State University College of Medicine and Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Patrick completed his training in pediatrics, neonatology and health services research as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar at the University of Michigan.

    Dr. Patrick joined the faculty of Vanderbilt University in 2013. His research focuses on improving outcomes for opioid-exposed infants and women with substance-use disorder and evaluating state and federal drug control policies. He previously served as Senior Science Policy Advisor to the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy and has testified before Congress on the rising numbers of newborns being diagnosed with opioid withdrawal after birth. He currently serves as an expert consultant for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's development of a Guide to the Management of Opioid-Dependent Pregnant and Parenting Women and Their Children, as a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Substance Abuse and as a board member on the US Office of Personnel Management's Multi-State Plan Program Advisory Board. Dr. Patrick's awards include the American Medical Association Foundation Excellence in Medicine Leadership Award and the Academic Pediatric Association Fellow Research Award. His research has been published in leading scientific journals including the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, Pediatrics and Health Affairs.

    Susan Hayashi, PhD

    Vice President, JBS International, Inc.

    Dr. Hayashi is Vice President of JBS International, Inc.

    Joseph George Perpich, MD, JD

    Senior Medical Advisor, JBS International, Inc.

    Joseph Perpich, MD, JD, a psychiatrist and attorney, is Senior Medical Advisor at JBS International, Inc (JBS). At JBS, he develops professional products and provides training and technical assistance services related to prevention of prescription drug abuse and overdose and medication assisted treatments for opioid use disorder. Prior to joining JBS, he led at JG Perpich, LLC the development and management of behavioral health research networks with a focus on international drug abuse, suicide prevention, and behavioral health services for the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH.) Dr. Perpich has served as Associate Director for Program Planning and Evaluation at the National Institutes of Health where he directed government-wide activities related to recombinant DNA research and regulatory policies (1976 to 1981). Before founding JGPerpich, LLC in 2002, Dr. Perpich was Vice President for Grants and Special Programs at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, where he created and managed the grants program for science education and international biomedical research.

    Krystyna R. Isaacs, PhD

    Senior Research Fellow, JBS International, Inc.

    CURRENT EMPLOYMENT

    2012-Present JBS International, Project Director/Sr Research Fellow, North Bethesda, MD – Current responsibilities include researching and preparing articles, briefs, and program reports for clients at NIH and SAMHSA.

    PAST EMPLOYMENT

    2001 – 2012 JGPerpich, LLC, Vice President, Program Development, Bethesda, MD - As Project Manager and then Vice President for NIH Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Contracts and Cooperative Agreements at JGP, I was primarily responsible for planning and writing several successful SBIR and Cooperative Agreement proposals; coordination of the Advisory Board activities and meetings; managing deliverables and budget for SBIR contracts; organizing numerous virtual working group sessions to develop scientific content for conferences, leadership meetings, and white papers; writing formal evaluations of pilot activities and preparing summary reports; producing multiple career development webinar series, including ones related to Academic Development Plans, scientific presentations, and publications; and facilitating the development of several working groups to produce a scientific presentation at a national meeting on suicide and special populations; arranging workshops for scientific meetings.

    1997 – 1998 Howard Hughes Medical Institute, International Program, Program Analyst, Chevy Chase, MD - Organized scientific workshops, international meetings and visiting lectureships abroad; prepared press releases for international grantees; managed international scientific grants; initiated development of electronic information access for foreign research scholars.

    1992 – 1997 National Institute of Mental Health, Laboratory of Clinical Science, Postdoctoral Fellow & Senior Staff Fellow, Bethesda, MD; Twenty-eight peer-reviewed publications

    Anne Leopold, MSc

    Project Manager, JBS International, Inc.

    Anne Leopold is a Project Manager at JBS International, Inc.

  • MAT for SUD: Review of Medications, Research Evidence, and Implementation Effort Disparities (1.5 CME)

    Contains 3 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    This three-part Symposium will begin with a review of alcohol and opioid use in the United States and the FDA-approved medications for treating alcohol and opioid use disorders, followed by a discussion of the major findings from two NIDA Clinical Trials Network research studies focused on the use of buprenorphine with young adult heroin users and prescription opioid users. The Symposium will conclude with a discussion of the results from a study that surveyed 192 substance use disorder treatment programs about the availability of medication-assisted treatment (MAT) and racial disparities in access to MAT among American Indian and Alaska Native populations. This portion of the Symposium will include barriers to MAT adoption in treatment programs that serve these communities and recommendations for improving access to MAT for AI/AN populations.

    This Symposium will feature three presentations focused on the use of medications in the treatment of alcohol and opioid use disorders. The first presentation will begin with a discussion of the context for medication-assisted treatment (positive and negative perceptions), the epidemiology of alcohol and opioid use (user demographics), a review of the various classes of opioids, an overview of each FDA-approved medication, its indication, to whom it is administered, and how it works, and treatment settings for medication-assisted treatment (MAT). Medications will include: naltrexone, methadone, acamprosate, and buprenorphine. Part I will conclude with a discussion of strategies that can be utilized with clients to talk about their use of medications, and strategies to address health disparities through increased access to medication-assisted treatment. The second presentation will review the key findings from two NIDA Clinical Trials Network studies that were conducted to assess the use of buprenorphine with young adult heroin dependent individuals and prescription opioid dependent individuals. Key topics will include a review of each protocol, participant demographics, results, and clinical implications. The third presentation will describe the use of MAT of substance use disorders for American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIs/ANs) and barriers to broader implementation of MAT in treatment settings that serve these communities. American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) experience higher rates of substance use disorders and less access to high-quality care than other racial/ethnic groups.

    Thomas Freese, PhD

    Principal Investigator and Co-Director, Pacific Southwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center (Pacific Southwest ATTC, HHS Region 9)

    Thomas E. Freese, Ph.D., received his doctorate degree in clinical psychology from the California School of Professional Psychology in 1995. Dr. Freese is currently the Director of Training for UCLA ISAP, Principal Investigator and Director of the SAMHSA-funded Pacific Southwest Addiction Technology Transfer Center (PSATTC, HHS Region 9), and Principal Investigator and Co-Director of the SAMHSA-funded Center of Excellence on Racial and Ethnic Young Men Who Have Sex with Men and Other Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Individuals (YMSM+LGBT CoE). Dr. Freese has served as Principal Investigator on projects funded by the California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs and Department of Health Care Services to train providers to implement Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT). Dr. Freese has also led several large projects that assist providers in implementing integrated treatment for co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders. He has been a featured presenter at conferences and meetings nationally and internationally on the impact and treatment of methamphetamine and opioid dependence. In addition, Dr. Freese has served as the Project Director on a number of studies including research on methamphetamine use. He has worked in the addiction field since 1983, and has developed and conducted trainings in 45 states and internationally, providing training and workshops for clinicians-in-training at the all levels.

    Beth Rutkowski, MPH

    Associate Director of Training and Epidemiologist, UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, Pacific Southwest ATTC

    Beth Rutkowski received her Master of Public Health degree in 2000, with an emphasis on epidemiology and quantitative methods, from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, School of Public Health. She has been associated with UCLA's Integrated Substance Abuse Programs (ISAP) since December 2000, and currently serves as the Associate Director of Training. The majority of Ms. Rutkowski's time is devoted to the SAMHSA-supported Pacific Southwest Addiction Technology Training Center, where she develops training packages based on evidence-based substance use disorder research and targeted to the community at large. In addition, she organizes and conducts conferences and trainings throughout the Pacific Southwest region (HHS Region 9, covering AZ, CA, HI, NV, and the six U.S. Affiliated Pacific Jurisdictions) on scientifically validated interventions and topics, such as substance use disorders research and policy, methamphetamine abuse, synthetic drugs, process improvement strategies to improve client engagement and retention in treatment, SBIRT, HIV and drug abuse, substance abuse epidemiology, medication-assisted treatment, and best practices in addiction treatment.

    Traci Rieckmann, PhD

    Associate Director, Oregon Health and Science University, Northwest ATTC

    Dr. Rieckmann is an Associate Professor in the School of Public Health at Oregon Health & Science University. She leads the Behavioral Health Innovations Team which serves as leaders at the intersection of research, implementaion and training for local and national health services. This draws from her role as Principal Investigator at Northwest Addiction Technology and Transfer Center (NWATTC), and co-investigator on a NIDA R21/R33 examining the impact of Oregon's Medicaid expansion and ACO development on patients with substance use disorders. She pulls from her experience serving as Principal Investigator on federal NIH and SAMHSA awards, a state contract examining implementation of medication assisted treatment (MAT) in a local community health center, and two protocols within the National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network. Her research focuses on the clinical development and successful implementation of behavioral and pharmacological substance use disorder treatment protocols, extensive project management experience with community-based clinical care settings and primary care. My clinical background and expertise in mixed-methodologies contribute to my broad understanding of behavioral health, integrative medicine and the translation of research to practice.

  • Treatment of Opioid Addiction in Young Adults: Current Research and Innovative Approaches (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Young adults with opioid addiction have particular developmental vulnerabilities and treatment needs. Although they seem to have poorer outcomes compared to older adults, there are approaches that provide the basis for optimism. This session will review current research findings and innovative clinical approaches to opioid addiction in youth.

    The epidemic of opioid addiction in youth has gained recognition as a substantial public health problem of alarming proportions. Young adults represent a population with particular developmental vulnerabilities and treatment needs. There is very little clear coherent direction for treatment providers, lack of consensus among clinicians on treatment approaches, and insufficient evidence on which to base a standard of care. However, although young adults seem to have relatively poorer outcomes compared to their older adult counterparts, there are a variety of emerging and encouraging clinical approaches that provide the basis for optimism. This session will feature a review of current work on opioid addiction in young adults, both current research findings and innovative clinical approaches. Dr Schuman-Olivier will present findings on the differential outcomes of youth compared to older adults with opioid dependence during buprenorphine treatment. He will review outcomes for opioid dependent youth from a large study of age-specific residential treatment. Finally, he will discuss preliminary experience with using an innovative mobile platform integrating secure pill dispensers, remote monitoring technologies and motivational interviewing to enhance adherence and effectiveness among young adults in buprenorphine treatment. Dr Vo will present findings on the relationship of vulnerability factors (such as impulsiveness, depressive symptoms and working memory deficits) on outcomes, the impact of gender and romantic partner influence on initiation and progression, and the results of specialized young adult treatment in a community treatment setting with an emphasis on comparative effectiveness of buprenorphine vs extended release naltrexone. Dr Fishman will conclude with a comparison of treatment models, and a discussion of clinical implications and challenges. Topics that present particular challenges to the field include: linkages from inpatient to outpatient treatment, use and choice of relapse prevention medications, barriers to retention, the need for developmentally-informed approaches to engagement, the encouragement of broader family involvement and support including the balance of confidentiality vs family communication, and approaches to ongoing use of non-opioid substances during treatment. This concluding section of the session will also feature audience discussion and Q&A.

    Marc J. Fishman

    MD, DFASAM

    Marc Fishman MD is board certified in addiction psychiatry and addiction medicine. A faculty member of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, he is Medical Director and CEO of Maryland Treatment Centers, a regional behavioral health care provider, with inpatient and outpatient facilities for adolescents and adults. His clinical specialties include treatment of drug-involved and dual-diagnosis adolescents, opioid dependence in adolescents and adults, and co-occurring disorders. He has been principal investigator or collaborator for several NIDA- and CSAT-funded projects to improve and evaluate adolescent treatment, as well as pharmacotherapy trials in adults. He is the author of numerous articles and book chapters on addiction treatment, and lectures widely on a variety of topics including adolescent treatment, youth opioid treatment, placement and treatment matching strategies. Dr. Fishman served as a co-editor for the most recent editions of ASAMs Patient Placement Criteria, leading the adolescent section, and served as the chief editor for the ASAM PPC Supplement on Pharmacotherapies for Alcohol Use Disorders. He is the chair of the Adolescent Committee for ASAM. He is a Past President of the Maryland Society of Addiction Medicine.

    Hoa Vo

    PhD

    Dr. Vo is a clinical psychologist and research scientist at Maryland Treatment Centers in Baltimore. She completed her PhD at the University of MD, and postdoctoral fellowships at the University of Texas and the University of North Texas. She worked on research examining outcomes for heroin addiction in Vietnam as a Fogerty International Fellow. Currently, Dr. Vo is a research scientist at the Mountain Manor Treatment Center.

    Zev Schuman-Olivier

    MD, FASAM

    Dr. Schuman-Olivier is a board-certified addiction psychiatrist with expertise in opioid use disorder treatment for young adults. After graduating from Tufts University School of Medicine, he completed psychiatry residency at Harvard Medical School (HMS)/Cambridge Health Alliance (CHA), and the Harvard addiction psychiatry fellowship. He trained at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Addiction Recovery Management Service, specializing in transitional age youth. For 3 years, he was medical director for WestBridge, a program providing evidence-based therapies, family-centered care, and residential programs for young adults and college students with co-occurring disorders. He is currently Medical Director of Addictions at CHA and Instructor in Psychiatry at HMS. He is a member of the Massachusetts Medical Society task force on prescription opioid prescribing.

    Dr. Schuman-Olivier is a productive, addiction clinical researcher with federal funding in several areas. He received the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry Young Investigator Award for research on buprenorphine diversion. He has conducted outcomes research with opioid-dependent young adults in both office-based opioid treatment and residential settings. During his research fellowship at MGH Center for Addiction Medicine, he studied the effects of Mindfulness Training on inhibitory control among smokers. In his current role as Executive Director of the CHA Center for Mindfulness and Compassion (CMC) (www.challiance.org/CMC), he has received university-, philanthropic- and NIH- grants to study the MINDFUL-PC project, which integrates mindfulness training into primary care. As a founding member of the Mindfulness Research Collaborative, he is funded through the NIH Science of Behavior Change Initiative to investigate how mindfulness influences self-regulation and medical regimen adherence. With NIDA funding through the Center for Technology and Behavioral Health (www.c4tbh.org) at Dartmouth, he has been developing MySafeRx, an integrated mobile platform for enhancing buprenorphine adherence and diversion prevention among young adults with opioid use disorders (www.MySafeRx.org).

  • How to Use Alcoholics Anonymous in Clinical Practice (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 ™ credits while watching this workshop from the ASAM 47th Annual Conference, 2016, which is designed to help clinicians improve patient outcome in relation to the following issues: Although 3% of the population report having attended an AA meeting, the AA survey of its membership revealed that only 4% of the respondents were referred by medical professionals, likely reflecting a disjunction between clinical need and effective practice. Why is there an apparent deficit in use of AA relative to its potential use by psychiatrists? Most physicians have had limited exposure in how to optimally address the following aspects of employing Twelve Step meetings for their patients - (1) how to select those who are suitable for referral; (2) how AA works to promote abstinence; and (3) how best to refer patients to this fellowship. This workshop is designed for attendees to gain an understanding of the role this fellowship can play in clinical practice: (1) to improve their skills in patient selection for AA, (2) achieve effective referral, and (3) employ optimal patient management relative to its use in specific clinical situations.

    This workshop is designed to help clinicians improve patient outcome in relation to the following issue: Alcohol and drug dependence are psychiatric disorders of high prevalence, with 14% and 7.5% of the population, respectively, meeting established diagnostic criteria. Although 3% of the population report having attended an AA meeting, the AA triennial survey of its membership revealed that only 4% of the respondents were referred to this fellowship by "medical professionals," likely reflecting a disjunction between clinical need and effective practice.

    Why is there an apparent deficit in use of AA relative to its potential use by psychiatrists? Most psychiatrists have had limited exposure in their training for (1) selecting those who are suitable for referral; (2) how AA works to promote abstinence; and (3) how best to refer patients to this fellowship.

    This workshop is designed for attendees to gain an understanding of the role this fellowship can play in clinical practice: (1) to improve their skills in patient selection for AA, (2) achieve effective referral, and (3) employ optimal patient management relative to its use. Four speakers expert in these issues will each present techniques for how to achieve this in respective to patient settings, followed by an exchange with the attendees on how best to apply the skills discussed.

    The workshop will be divided as follows: four 7-minute trigger presentations, each followed by a brief Q and A from the attendees, then followed by a full discussion. The presentations are as follows: (1) Integrating AA Referral into Clinical Office Practice: utility for patients with severe substance use disorder and for some patients with moderate disorder; how to help a patient make use of the AA encounter, using techniques drawn from the NIAAA format for Twelve Step Facilitations; (2) Integrating AA Use in the Inpatient Setting: Balancing Twelve Step involvement with medication and CBT-oriented programs, drawing on AA volunteers to conduct Twelve Step groups in proximity to the unit, as appropriate; managing staff to make appropriate referral to AA; referral of aftercare patients to AA-based step-down programs; (3) Using People in AA-Based Recovery in Outpatient Settings: Defining the appropriate role for such parties as adjunctive to professional care; employing recovering people in ambulatory networks such as Physicians Health Programs; the appropriate relationship between professionally based outpatient programs and community-based AA meetings; distinction between use of AA and Narcotics Anonymous.

    The last half hour will address clinical problems raised by attendees relative to the use of Twelve Step programs. Exchanges between attendees and with panel members will focus on specific clinical situations relative to patients encountered in practice, and how clinical outcome can be maximized in those situations.

    Marc Galanter

    MD, DFASAM

    Marc Galanter, M.D., is a Professor of Psychiatry at NYU, Founding Director of the Division of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse, a Senior Editor of the Journal “Substance Abuse,” and co-editor of the American Psychiatric Association's “Textbook of Substance Abuse Treatment.” He has written four books, “Cults: Faith, Healing, and Coercion,” “Network Therapy for Alcohol and Drug Abuse,” “Spirituality and the Healthy Mind,” and "What is Alcoholics Anonymous?", and published over 200 peer-reviewed articles. His NIH and foundation-funded studies have addressed network therapy for substance abuse, pharmacologic treatment for addiction, the psychology of Twelve-Step recovery, and spirituality in healthcare.

    Dr. Galanter attended Albert Einstein College of Medicine where he did his residency in psychiatry. After that he was a Clinical Associate of the National Institute of Mental Health, then an NIH Career Teacher. He later served as President of the Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA, 1976-1977), the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry (AAAP, 1991-1992), and the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM, 1999-2001). Among his awards are the Gold Achievement Award for Innovation in Clinical Care, the Oskar Pfister Award for Spirituality, Religion and Psychiatry, and the Seymour Vestermark Award for Psychiatric Education, all from the American Psychiatric Association; the McGovern Award for Medical teaching from AMERSA; the Smithers Award for Research form ASAM; and New York State's Award for Psychiatric Research.

    Joseph Westermyer

    MD, PhD, MPH

    Joe Westermeyer has worked in methadone programs since serving in one of the initial VA methadone programs in the mid-1970s.  Subsequently he served as a consultant to the World Health Organization.  The latter role involved aiding countries identify the nature and extent of opioid and other substance disorders,  undertake broad-based approaches to prevention and early intervention, and  (as appropriate) consider treatment and rehabilitation programs.  Such programs included utilizing methadone treatment in various ways, including short- and long-term withdrawal regimens, as well as short- and long-term maintenance methods (as described in an edited book by Arif and Westermeyer).  His recent work in this area grows out of intensive observation and clinical work with a group of methadone maintenance patients over several years.
    This most recent work depends on longitudinal observation and study over a long time, with repeated use of methadone blood levels (trough and 3-hour peaks) and electrocardiographs.  He collaborated with cardiologists Drs. Adabag and Anand in obtaining hand-measured QT intervals and comparing them with computer-derived QT intervals.  These data were obtained both routinely (upon induction and then annually) and as warranted when clinical symptoms or disability arose.  This work builds on original basic work done with methadone decades ago, but then abandoned – with many clinical questions unanswered. 

    John Fromson

    MD

    John A. Fromson, MD, is vice chair for community psychiatry at Brigham and Women's Hospital and chief of psychiatry at Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital. He is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School

    Alphonse Kenison Roy, III

    MD, DFASAM, DLFAPA

    A. Kenison Roy, III, MD, DFASAM, DLFAPA is a specialist in Addiction Medicine. He is Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Tulane and LSU and Medical Director of the Dual Diagnosis Unit at River Oaks Hospital in New Orleans, LA and Medical Director of Addiction Recovery Resources, Inc. in Metairie, LA.

  • Cannabis: Research Updates (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits while learning about cannabis, the most commonly used illicit substance in USA. In addition use of marijuana continues to rise facilitated by increased access to cannabis for medicinal and recreational purposes. Universal screening in primary care settings provides an opportunity for early identification and management of problematic use. This NIDA sponsored symposium aims to provide the ASAM audience with the most up to date study results on three aspects of cannabis research. 1) A description and the rationale for the establishment of a medical cannabis registry in Quebec, Canada; 2) The utility of Δ9-THC with cannabidiol (Sativex®) combined with Behavioral therapy for the management of Cannabis Dependence; and 3) The utility and the role of an electronically delivered Screen and Brief Assessment Tool for Tobacco, Alcohol, Prescription Drug Misuse and Other Substances (TAPS) among adult Primary Care Patients. The session will end with a moderated question and answer session to provide bidirectional dialogue between the panelists and members of the audience.

    Cannabis remains the commonly used illicit drug in USA with almost 20 million adults reporting past year use, according to the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Daily or almost daily use of marijuana has increased from 5.1 million persons in 2005 to 2007 to 8.1 million persons in 2013. Identification and management of problem cannabis use and adults with cannabis use disorders (CUD) who present at primary and general medical settings provides clinicians with a valuable opportunity to intervene and reduce or eliminate the negative consequences of addiction. However, several barriers exist, one of which is the lack of brief validated and combined screening and assessment tools which can be administered without disrupting the workflow in these busy practices. Furthermore, in those treatment seeking adults with CUD, although a few behavioral treatments have been shown to be effective in reducing problem cannabis use, they have not been widely adopted and novel pharmacological treatments have not shown much promise. In addition to the increase in problem use, there is an increase in access to cannabis via rapidly evolving regulations regarding medicinal and recreational cannabis use. However, empirical evidence to support the therapeutic benefits of medical marijuana is scarce. 

    This symposium aims to provide viewers with the most up to date study results on three aspects of cannabis research. 1) A description and the rationale for the establishment of a medical cannabis registry in Quebec, Canada; 2) The utility of Δ9-THC with cannabidiol (Sativex(r)) combined with Behavioral therapy for the management of Cannabis Dependence; and 3) The utility and the role of an electronically delivered Screen and Brief Assessment Tool for Tobacco, Alcohol, Prescription Drug Misuse and Other Substances (TAPS) among adult Primary Care Patients. The session will end with a moderated question and answer session to provide bidirectional dialogue between the panelists and members of the audience.

    Geetha A. Subramaniam

    MD, DFAPA, DFAACAP

    Geetha is the Deputy Director of the NIDA Center for Clinical Trials Network. She is a accomplished SUD clinician and researacher. In addition to serving as a collaborative scientist on multi-site clinicat trials, she also is focused on forging alliances with medical organizations like ASAM to help inform physicians and allied health professionals by disseminating emerging research information.

    Udi Ghitza

    PhD

    Udi Ghitza, PhD, is a Health Scientist Administrator, Program Officer with the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Center for the Clinical Trials Network (CCTN) where he oversees clinical trials testing the effectiveness of behavioral and pharmacological treatments for substance use disorders in multi-site, nationwide studies that enroll large samples of diverse participants in community-based treatment programs and general medical settings. He also oversees an initiative conducted in collaboration with other federal agencies and state and community stakeholders to develop an expert-defined and consensus-based set of clinically-relevant, standardized performance measures that could be incorporated into electronic health record systems, particularly as these measures relate to substance use disorders and other behavioral health issues. In addition, Dr. Ghitza has overseen development of common data elements (CDEs) for harmonized data collection in clinical research on substance use disorders, which also serves as a resource for EHR vendors towards systems interoperability: URL: cde.drugabuse.gov/

    Dr. Ghitza has a degree in biological psychology and behavioral neuroscience from Rutgers University. Prior to joining the CCTN in 2008, he was a researcher at the NIDA Intramural Research Program where he has worked with Dr. Kenzie Preston conducting clinical-trial studies of behavioral and pharmacological treatments for cocaine and opioid use disorders. In his behavioral neuroscience research at the NIDA Intramural Research Program, he worked with Dr. Yavin Shaham in studies using a rat relapse model to examine cellular and neuroanatomical mechanisms underlying relapse to high-fat food-seeking behavior.

    Mark A. Ware

    BA, MBBS, MRCP(UK), MSc

    Mark A. Ware, BA, MBBS, MRCP(UK), MSc, is Associate Professor of Anesthesia and Family Medicine at McGill University.

    Bernard Le Foll

    Md, PhD, MCFP

    Dr. Bernard Le Foll, MD, PhD, MCFP, is a clinician-scientist specialized in drug addiction. He is the Medical Head of the Addiction Medicine Service and Medical Withdrawal Service at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH). He is the Head of the Translational Addiction Research Laboratory within the Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute of CAMH and Head of the Alcohol Research and Treatment Clinic within the Addiction Medicine Service of CAMH. He is a Professor at University of Toronto in the Departments of Family and Community Medicine, Psychiatry, Pharmacology and Institute of Medical Sciences and holds several graduate faculty appointments. He received specialized training in drug addiction and behavioral and cognitive therapy in France, has written addiction treatment guidelines and various reviews on neurobiology and treatment of drug addiction. Dr Le Foll has published more than 120 peer-reviews manuscripts, several book chapters and has been involved on the Editorial Boards of 19 scientific journals. He has been coordinator of several clinical trial studies. His research evaluates novel therapeutic approaches using a combination of preclinical, clinical, genetic and brain imaging approaches. He has received scientific prizes and awards from the Canadian Institutes for Health Research, the National Institutes of Health, the French Academy of Medicine, the American College for Neuropsychopharmacology, the College on Problems on Drug Dependence, the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco, Pfizer, OPGRC, the Heart and Stroke Foundation, Ontario Lung Association and NARSAD.

    Robert Schwartz

    MD

    Dr. Schwartz is a psychiatrist and Medical Director of Friends Research Institute. He is the Co-Principal Investigator of the Mid-Atlantic Node of the NIDA Clinical Trials Network, where he led a recently completed multi-site study of a screening instrument for alcohol, tobacco, and drug use among primary care patients. Dr. Schwartz is the former Director of the Division of Alcohol and Drug Abuse at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. He has been Principal Investigator of numerous NIDA-funded studies and has over 130 publications. He is currently the Principal Investigator of two studies which are examining: (1) a novel approach to re-engineering methadone treatment and (2) the provision of methadone treatment and patient navigation to jail inmates in Baltimore. He is the recipient of the Dole-Nyswander Award from the American Association for the Treatment of Opioid Disorders and served seven years on the NIDA Health Services Review and the NIH Health Services Organization and Delivery Study Sections.

  • A Brief Introduction to Motivational Interviewing (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits while learning the basics of motivational interviewing in clinical practice from this session recording from the ASAM 47th Annual Conference, Innovations and addiction medicine.

    In this 90-minute presentation, William Miller, PhD, the original developer of motivational interviewing, will describe the defining components of this clinical method as contained in the newest (3rd) edition of the textbook and briefly review research on its efficacy. This will be accompanied by a demonstration video interview and an experiential exercise to illustrate the nature of motivational interviewing.

    William Miller, PhD

    Emeritus Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry, University of New Mexico

    Dr. William R. Miller is Emeritus Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of New Mexico where he served as Director of Clinical Training for the doctoral program in clinical psychology and as Co-Director of the Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse and Addictions (CASAA). Dr. Miller's publications include over 50 books and 400 articles and chapters including the original 1983 description of the clinical method of motivational interviewing. Fundamentally interested in the psychology of change, he has focused in particular on the development, testing, and dissemination of behavioral treatments for addictions. With more than 40 years of experience in addiction research and treatment, he has served as principal investigator for numerous research grants and contracts, founded a private practice group, directed a large public treatment program, and served as a consultant to many organizations including the United States Senate, the World Health Organization, the National Academy of Sciences, and the National Institutes of Health. In recognition of his research contributions, Dr. Miller is a recipient of the international Jellinek Memorial Award, two career achievement awards from the American Psychological Association, and an Innovators in Combating Substance Abuse award from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. He maintains an active interest in the interface of spirituality and psychology. His books have been translated into 26 languages and the Institute for Scientific Information has listed him as one of the world's most cited scientists.

  • Transitional Maintenance of Certification (T-moc) for Addiction Medicine: What it means for the Addiction Medicine Certified Physician (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Presentations will focus on the changes related to maintenance of certification and lifelong learning for the addiction medicine certified physician. Presenters will demonstrate how the T-moc program and lifelong learning serve not only as a tool to assist addiction medicine certified physicians in meeting their requirements, but also as a mechanism that will allow for continuous professional development. In addition, attendees will have an opportunity to discuss the current T-moc Program requirements and lifelong learning program in addiction medicine.

    The landscape of Maintenance of Certification (MOC) is rapidly changing and is a fundamental part of not only addiction medicine, but any specialty of medicine. Initiated by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) in 2000, MOC programs have quickly become a controversial topic among the 24 member boards of the ABMS. MOC programs are built upon professional standards, based on core competencies and assessed through a four-part framework. In order for addiction medicine certified physicians to stay abreast with the latest evidence based standards of care and medical literature, The Addiction Medicine Foundation has implemented a state-of-the-art program that allows for a more user-friendly, flexible and relevant program. As the addiction medicine specialty evolves, The Addiction Medicine Foundation will be charged with continuing to support a program that is a valuable tool in assessing physician competence, reduces the burden to physicians, and provides assurance of physician competence to the public.

    Lia Bennett

    MPH

    Lia Bennett is an independent consultant serving as the Director of Maintenance of Certification for the American Board of Addiction. She was a quality improvement program coordinator for the American College of Physicians and brings to ABAM, over 10 years of experience developing and managing MOC compliant programs. She has worked in the field of internal medicine conducting continuing medical education research in the areas of adult immunization, cardiovascular risk and diabetes. Ms. Bennett received her Masters of Public Health with a graduate certificate in Integrative Health. She strives to provide superior guidance to ABAM Diplomates.

    Robert Sokol

    MD

    Dr. Robert J. Sokol currently serves as a Distinguished Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Physiology and the John M. Malone, Jr., M.D., Endowed Chair and Director of the C.S. Mott Center for Human Growth and Development at Wayne State University in Detroit, Mich. Dr. Sokol graduated with the highest distinction in philosophy and from medical school with honors from the University of Rochester in New York. After residency training at Washington University/Barnes Hospital in St. Louis, Mo., and after serving as Dr. Willard Allen's last executive Chief Resident, he served in the Air Force as a Major and then completed a fellowship at Maternal-Fetal Medicine, as well as joining the faculty, first at the University of Rochester and then at Metrohealth/Case Western Reserve in Cleveland. He worked his way up to Professor and Director of the Perinatal Clinical Research Center. Recruited as Chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Wayne State University School of Medicine/Detroit Medical Center in 1983, he served as Dean and Senior Vice President for Medical Affairs from 1988 until 1999. Dr. Sokol is an internationally recognized expert in the area of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. In 1986, he established and directed the National Institutes of Health-funded WSU Fetal Alcohol Research Center, the only center of its kind in the country at the time. He is currently focused on risk detection and prevention methodology. He is Project Manager II for services in support of the Perinatology Research Branch of the NICHD and was the founding Chair of a University Department of Clinical and Translational Science. He has about 335 referreed papers and about 1500 total publications. He is President Elect of the American Board of Addiction Medicine.

  • Recovery Ready Ecosystems - Integrating Recovery Oriented Practice Methods (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    As multiple paradigms shifts have occurred within the treatment of behavioral health concerns (substance use disorders, mental health concerns, and co-occuring disorders), it is paramount that primary care physicians, addiction specialists, therapists, and all practitioners of wellness become well education on integrating long-term sustained recovery practices into each level of care. The following presentation expands upon the transition away from the acute model of behavioral health treatment, exploring the full continuum of care modality.

    As multiple paradigms shifts have occurred within the treatment of behavioral health concerns (substance use disorders, mental health concerns, and co-occurring disorders), it is paramount that primary care physicians, addiction specialists, therapists, and all practitioners of wellness become well educated on integrating long-term sustained recovery practices into each level of care. The following presentation expands upon the transition away from the acute model of behavioral health treatment, exploring the full continuum of care modality. The presenters will identify innovative practice methods, such as the My Recovery is E.P.I.C. program, that have integrated into treatment facilities to expand recovery oriented systems into residential and out patient services. The presenters will go further into exploring primary and tertiary intervention methods that include primary care, recovery oriented practices, and follow-up community aftercare resources. A third exploration will include an overview of the "recovery ready ecosystems" framework that incorporates integration of primary care, behavioral health care, and aftercare with a continuum of recovery practices. Practitioners at all levels have been well educated up to this point on the disease model, successful intervention, and remission practices - but a distinct lack of recovery education has been found at most levels of practice. The presenters, as subject matter experts, hope to increase awareness of innovative programs and practices, recovery to practice initiatives, and solicit critical thinking around next stage concepts for private and public practice.

    Therese McHale

    Project Coordinator

    Therese McHale is a Project Coordinator for Young People in Recovery.

    Damien C. Warsavage

    YE-CRS, CRS

    A Japanese/Korean vocal musician by trade, Damien Christopher Warsavage, YE-CRS, CRS earned his Recovery Specialist credentials from The Council Of Southeast Pennsylvania & the Pennsylvania Certification Board in 2015 & was hired by Young People In Recovery as a Site Leader for its "My Recovery Is E.P.I.C." program in the Greater Philadelphia area as of September 2015. Supporting causes greater than his own self-interests, Mr. Warsavage is also a community leader in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania, where he has met with local leaders & elected officials regarding equitable public school funding, LGBT+ youth rights advocacy, & increased access to recovery supports for the Upper Darby School District. While he isn't providing recovery services to clients in need, Mr. Warsavage volunteers his time to PRO-ACT (an arm of The Council Of Southeast Pennsylvania) & the Philadelphia chapter of YPR, taking part in lectures, training sessions, & group/individual facilitations whenever possible.

    Damien Warsavage's passion for recovery community advocacy was born from the sudden losses of his brother, Allen Christopher, & father, John Christopher, both of whom passed away from drug-related circumstances, within a week of each other, in April 2014. It is Mr. Warsavage's greatest hope that his family's life story will empower others to turn their grief into positive change by any (productive) means necessary.

  • Women, Girls and Alcohol: Current Research on Screening and Brief Intervention (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Drinking too much alcohol can seriously affect the health of women and girls. Excessive alcohol use increases the risk of certain types of cancers, heart disease, sexually transmitted diseases, unintended pregnancy, and many other health problems. Drinking during pregnancy can also lead to sudden infant death syndrome and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Screening and brief intervention is an effective strategy that can be used with women to help reduce their alcohol use and prevent alcohol-exposed pregnancies and other negative health outcomes. Targeted research projects can help us better understand the role gender may play in discussing alcohol use with women and girls and in providing appropriate prevention services. This symposium will highlight current research on screening and brief intervention in a variety of settings serving women and girls.

    Drinking too much alcohol can seriously affect the health of women and girls. Excessive alcohol use increases the risk of certain types of cancers, heart disease, sexually transmitted diseases, unintended pregnancy, and many other health problems. Drinking during pregnancy can also lead to sudden infant death syndrome and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Screening and brief intervention is an effective strategy that can be used with women to help reduce their alcohol use and prevent alcohol-exposed pregnancies and other negative health outcomes. Targeted research projects can help us better understand the role gender may play in discussing alcohol use with women and girls and in providing appropriate prevention services. This symposium will highlight current research on screening and brief intervention in a variety of settings serving women and girls.

    Constance Weisner

    DrPH, MSW

    Dr. Constance Weisner, DrPH, LCSW, is the Chief of Behavioral Health, Aging, and Infectious Diseases at the Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente and a Professor at the Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco. She has a doctorate in Public Health from the University of California, Berkeley and a Masters in Social Work from the University of Minnesota. She directs a research program addressing access, outcome, and cost effectiveness of substance use and mental health treatment. She is a member of the International Expert Advisory Group on Alcohol and Drug Dependence of the World Health Organization. She has also been a member of the National Advisory Council of the National Institute on Drug Abuse and of the National Advisory Council for the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. She has participated on several Institute of Medicine committees, including Improving the Quality of Health Care for Mental and Substance-Use Conditions, and Prevention, Diagnosis, Treatment and Management of Substance Use Disorders in the U.S. Armed Forces. She has received Merit Awards from NIDA and NIAAA. Her on-going work focuses on integrating alcohol, drug, and mental health services with health care.

    Grace Chang

    MD, MPH

    Dr. Grace Chang is professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and is currently the Director of Addiction Psychiatry for Mental Health and the Chief of Consultation Liaison Psychiatry at VA Boston. She has dedicated her clinical research career to the identification and treatment of the substance use disorders among women.

    Barbara L. Bonner

    PhD

    Barbara L. Bonner, PhD, a Clinical Child Psychologist, is a Professor and the CMRI/Jean Gumerson Endowed Chair, Director of the Center on Child Abuse and Neglect (CCAN), and Associate Director of the Child Study Center (CSC) in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. Her clinical and research interests include the assessment and treatment of abused children, treatment outcome and program effectiveness, prevention of child fatalities, and treatment of children and adolescents with inappropriate or illegal sexual behavior. Dr. Bonner is Past-President of the Board of Councilors of the International Society for Prevention of Child Abuse and Past President of the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children (APSAC). She has presented her research throughout the US and internationally.

    Andrea Kline-Simon

    MS

    Andrea Kline-Simon, MS, has worked as an Analyst and Data Consultant with the Drug and Alcohol Research Team (DART) at the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research for 8 years, on a variety of health, alcohol and drug treatment and mental health services studies, as well as epidemiological studies of vulnerable populations, including women, adolescents and patients with co-occurring disorders. She has collaborated with a number of researchers, individual clinicians, program directors and policy-makers on studies utilizing the Kaiser health system's diagnostic, utilization and cost data, as well as multi-level and longitudinal survey data. She led the analysis of an NIAAA trial examining different modalities of screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) for adolescents during primary care well-visits, and is continuing to lead analyses on models of adolescent SBIRT, in a study funded by the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation. She has examined the prevalence of behavioral health conditions and co-occurring medical conditions among both adults and adolescents in Kaiser, using its electronic health record. Using longitudinal cohorts of individuals who entered treatment for alcohol use disorders, she has also led time survival analyses (DTSA) examining relapse rates between alcohol patients who were abstinent 1 year post treatment versus those who became non-problem uses, and have further examined this population by comparing differences in costs and utilization between the drinker status groups over a 5 year period.

    Heidi Hutton

    PhD

    Heidi E. Hutton, PhD is a clinical psychologist and associate professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Her interest and expertise is in the development and implementation of person- and computer-delivered interventions to reduce alcohol and drug use among HIV infected and HIV at risk individuals. Her work includes the development of an avatar delivered, computer based intervention for substance use and testing the efficacy of text messages and interactive voice response technology for reduction of alcohol misuse among women. Her research focuses primarily on interventions for inner city women that increase safer sexual behaviors and increase HIV testing, treatment enrollment and adherence. More recently, she is has expanded her work to include two international projects, adapting evidence based interventions for HIV infected patients in Uganda and Vietnam. A key interest is the implementation of substance abuse interventions that are effective and sustainable in real world settings. As a clinician, she has provided treatment for over 20 years to HIV-infected patients with extensive histories of psychiatric disorders, trauma, and substance abuse at the Johns Hopkins HIV clinic.

    Deidra Y. Roach

    MD

    Dr. Roach has more than 30 years of experience in the field of addiction treatment. She currently serves as a Program Director for the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism where, among other responsibilities, she manages research portfolios addressing the treatment of co-occurring mental health and alcohol use disorders and alcohol-related HIV/AIDS among women. She also serves on the Interagency Coordinating Committee on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (ICCFASD) and the NIH Coordinating Committee for Research on Women’s Health. Dr. Roach chairs the Women Drinking, and Pregnancy Work Group of the ICCFASD.