Catalog Advanced Search

Search by Categories
Search in Packages
Search by Format
Search by Type
Search by Date Range
Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
Start
End
Search by Keyword
Sort By
  • Transitional Maintenance of Certification (T-moc) for Addiction Medicine: What it means for the Addiction Medicine Certified Physician (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Presentations will focus on the changes related to maintenance of certification and lifelong learning for the addiction medicine certified physician. Presenters will demonstrate how the T-moc program and lifelong learning serve not only as a tool to assist addiction medicine certified physicians in meeting their requirements, but also as a mechanism that will allow for continuous professional development. In addition, attendees will have an opportunity to discuss the current T-moc Program requirements and lifelong learning program in addiction medicine.

    The landscape of Maintenance of Certification (MOC) is rapidly changing and is a fundamental part of not only addiction medicine, but any specialty of medicine. Initiated by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) in 2000, MOC programs have quickly become a controversial topic among the 24 member boards of the ABMS. MOC programs are built upon professional standards, based on core competencies and assessed through a four-part framework. In order for addiction medicine certified physicians to stay abreast with the latest evidence based standards of care and medical literature, The Addiction Medicine Foundation has implemented a state-of-the-art program that allows for a more user-friendly, flexible and relevant program. As the addiction medicine specialty evolves, The Addiction Medicine Foundation will be charged with continuing to support a program that is a valuable tool in assessing physician competence, reduces the burden to physicians, and provides assurance of physician competence to the public.

    Lia Bennett

    MPH

    Lia Bennett is an independent consultant serving as the Director of Maintenance of Certification for the American Board of Addiction. She was a quality improvement program coordinator for the American College of Physicians and brings to ABAM, over 10 years of experience developing and managing MOC compliant programs. She has worked in the field of internal medicine conducting continuing medical education research in the areas of adult immunization, cardiovascular risk and diabetes. Ms. Bennett received her Masters of Public Health with a graduate certificate in Integrative Health. She strives to provide superior guidance to ABAM Diplomates.

    Robert Sokol

    MD

    Dr. Robert J. Sokol currently serves as a Distinguished Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Physiology and the John M. Malone, Jr., M.D., Endowed Chair and Director of the C.S. Mott Center for Human Growth and Development at Wayne State University in Detroit, Mich. Dr. Sokol graduated with the highest distinction in philosophy and from medical school with honors from the University of Rochester in New York. After residency training at Washington University/Barnes Hospital in St. Louis, Mo., and after serving as Dr. Willard Allen's last executive Chief Resident, he served in the Air Force as a Major and then completed a fellowship at Maternal-Fetal Medicine, as well as joining the faculty, first at the University of Rochester and then at Metrohealth/Case Western Reserve in Cleveland. He worked his way up to Professor and Director of the Perinatal Clinical Research Center. Recruited as Chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Wayne State University School of Medicine/Detroit Medical Center in 1983, he served as Dean and Senior Vice President for Medical Affairs from 1988 until 1999. Dr. Sokol is an internationally recognized expert in the area of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. In 1986, he established and directed the National Institutes of Health-funded WSU Fetal Alcohol Research Center, the only center of its kind in the country at the time. He is currently focused on risk detection and prevention methodology. He is Project Manager II for services in support of the Perinatology Research Branch of the NICHD and was the founding Chair of a University Department of Clinical and Translational Science. He has about 335 referreed papers and about 1500 total publications. He is President Elect of the American Board of Addiction Medicine.

  • Recovery Ready Ecosystems - Integrating Recovery Oriented Practice Methods (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    As multiple paradigms shifts have occurred within the treatment of behavioral health concerns (substance use disorders, mental health concerns, and co-occuring disorders), it is paramount that primary care physicians, addiction specialists, therapists, and all practitioners of wellness become well education on integrating long-term sustained recovery practices into each level of care. The following presentation expands upon the transition away from the acute model of behavioral health treatment, exploring the full continuum of care modality.

    As multiple paradigms shifts have occurred within the treatment of behavioral health concerns (substance use disorders, mental health concerns, and co-occurring disorders), it is paramount that primary care physicians, addiction specialists, therapists, and all practitioners of wellness become well educated on integrating long-term sustained recovery practices into each level of care. The following presentation expands upon the transition away from the acute model of behavioral health treatment, exploring the full continuum of care modality. The presenters will identify innovative practice methods, such as the My Recovery is E.P.I.C. program, that have integrated into treatment facilities to expand recovery oriented systems into residential and out patient services. The presenters will go further into exploring primary and tertiary intervention methods that include primary care, recovery oriented practices, and follow-up community aftercare resources. A third exploration will include an overview of the "recovery ready ecosystems" framework that incorporates integration of primary care, behavioral health care, and aftercare with a continuum of recovery practices. Practitioners at all levels have been well educated up to this point on the disease model, successful intervention, and remission practices - but a distinct lack of recovery education has been found at most levels of practice. The presenters, as subject matter experts, hope to increase awareness of innovative programs and practices, recovery to practice initiatives, and solicit critical thinking around next stage concepts for private and public practice.

    Therese McHale

    Project Coordinator

    Therese McHale is a Project Coordinator for Young People in Recovery.

    Damien C. Warsavage

    YE-CRS, CRS

    A Japanese/Korean vocal musician by trade, Damien Christopher Warsavage, YE-CRS, CRS earned his Recovery Specialist credentials from The Council Of Southeast Pennsylvania & the Pennsylvania Certification Board in 2015 & was hired by Young People In Recovery as a Site Leader for its "My Recovery Is E.P.I.C." program in the Greater Philadelphia area as of September 2015. Supporting causes greater than his own self-interests, Mr. Warsavage is also a community leader in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania, where he has met with local leaders & elected officials regarding equitable public school funding, LGBT+ youth rights advocacy, & increased access to recovery supports for the Upper Darby School District. While he isn't providing recovery services to clients in need, Mr. Warsavage volunteers his time to PRO-ACT (an arm of The Council Of Southeast Pennsylvania) & the Philadelphia chapter of YPR, taking part in lectures, training sessions, & group/individual facilitations whenever possible.

    Damien Warsavage's passion for recovery community advocacy was born from the sudden losses of his brother, Allen Christopher, & father, John Christopher, both of whom passed away from drug-related circumstances, within a week of each other, in April 2014. It is Mr. Warsavage's greatest hope that his family's life story will empower others to turn their grief into positive change by any (productive) means necessary.

  • Women, Girls and Alcohol: Current Research on Screening and Brief Intervention (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Drinking too much alcohol can seriously affect the health of women and girls. Excessive alcohol use increases the risk of certain types of cancers, heart disease, sexually transmitted diseases, unintended pregnancy, and many other health problems. Drinking during pregnancy can also lead to sudden infant death syndrome and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Screening and brief intervention is an effective strategy that can be used with women to help reduce their alcohol use and prevent alcohol-exposed pregnancies and other negative health outcomes. Targeted research projects can help us better understand the role gender may play in discussing alcohol use with women and girls and in providing appropriate prevention services. This symposium will highlight current research on screening and brief intervention in a variety of settings serving women and girls.

    Drinking too much alcohol can seriously affect the health of women and girls. Excessive alcohol use increases the risk of certain types of cancers, heart disease, sexually transmitted diseases, unintended pregnancy, and many other health problems. Drinking during pregnancy can also lead to sudden infant death syndrome and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. Screening and brief intervention is an effective strategy that can be used with women to help reduce their alcohol use and prevent alcohol-exposed pregnancies and other negative health outcomes. Targeted research projects can help us better understand the role gender may play in discussing alcohol use with women and girls and in providing appropriate prevention services. This symposium will highlight current research on screening and brief intervention in a variety of settings serving women and girls.

    Constance Weisner

    DrPH, MSW

    Dr. Constance Weisner, DrPH, LCSW, is the Chief of Behavioral Health, Aging, and Infectious Diseases at the Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente and a Professor at the Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco. She has a doctorate in Public Health from the University of California, Berkeley and a Masters in Social Work from the University of Minnesota. She directs a research program addressing access, outcome, and cost effectiveness of substance use and mental health treatment. She is a member of the International Expert Advisory Group on Alcohol and Drug Dependence of the World Health Organization. She has also been a member of the National Advisory Council of the National Institute on Drug Abuse and of the National Advisory Council for the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. She has participated on several Institute of Medicine committees, including Improving the Quality of Health Care for Mental and Substance-Use Conditions, and Prevention, Diagnosis, Treatment and Management of Substance Use Disorders in the U.S. Armed Forces. She has received Merit Awards from NIDA and NIAAA. Her on-going work focuses on integrating alcohol, drug, and mental health services with health care.

    Grace Chang

    MD, MPH

    Dr. Grace Chang is professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and is currently the Director of Addiction Psychiatry for Mental Health and the Chief of Consultation Liaison Psychiatry at VA Boston. She has dedicated her clinical research career to the identification and treatment of the substance use disorders among women.

    Barbara L. Bonner

    PhD

    Barbara L. Bonner, PhD, a Clinical Child Psychologist, is a Professor and the CMRI/Jean Gumerson Endowed Chair, Director of the Center on Child Abuse and Neglect (CCAN), and Associate Director of the Child Study Center (CSC) in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. Her clinical and research interests include the assessment and treatment of abused children, treatment outcome and program effectiveness, prevention of child fatalities, and treatment of children and adolescents with inappropriate or illegal sexual behavior. Dr. Bonner is Past-President of the Board of Councilors of the International Society for Prevention of Child Abuse and Past President of the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children (APSAC). She has presented her research throughout the US and internationally.

    Andrea Kline-Simon

    MS

    Andrea Kline-Simon, MS, has worked as an Analyst and Data Consultant with the Drug and Alcohol Research Team (DART) at the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research for 8 years, on a variety of health, alcohol and drug treatment and mental health services studies, as well as epidemiological studies of vulnerable populations, including women, adolescents and patients with co-occurring disorders. She has collaborated with a number of researchers, individual clinicians, program directors and policy-makers on studies utilizing the Kaiser health system's diagnostic, utilization and cost data, as well as multi-level and longitudinal survey data. She led the analysis of an NIAAA trial examining different modalities of screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) for adolescents during primary care well-visits, and is continuing to lead analyses on models of adolescent SBIRT, in a study funded by the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation. She has examined the prevalence of behavioral health conditions and co-occurring medical conditions among both adults and adolescents in Kaiser, using its electronic health record. Using longitudinal cohorts of individuals who entered treatment for alcohol use disorders, she has also led time survival analyses (DTSA) examining relapse rates between alcohol patients who were abstinent 1 year post treatment versus those who became non-problem uses, and have further examined this population by comparing differences in costs and utilization between the drinker status groups over a 5 year period.

    Heidi Hutton

    PhD

    Heidi E. Hutton, PhD is a clinical psychologist and associate professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Her interest and expertise is in the development and implementation of person- and computer-delivered interventions to reduce alcohol and drug use among HIV infected and HIV at risk individuals. Her work includes the development of an avatar delivered, computer based intervention for substance use and testing the efficacy of text messages and interactive voice response technology for reduction of alcohol misuse among women. Her research focuses primarily on interventions for inner city women that increase safer sexual behaviors and increase HIV testing, treatment enrollment and adherence. More recently, she is has expanded her work to include two international projects, adapting evidence based interventions for HIV infected patients in Uganda and Vietnam. A key interest is the implementation of substance abuse interventions that are effective and sustainable in real world settings. As a clinician, she has provided treatment for over 20 years to HIV-infected patients with extensive histories of psychiatric disorders, trauma, and substance abuse at the Johns Hopkins HIV clinic.

    Deidra Y. Roach

    MD

    Dr. Roach has more than 30 years of experience in the field of addiction treatment. She currently serves as a Program Director for the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism where, among other responsibilities, she manages research portfolios addressing the treatment of co-occurring mental health and alcohol use disorders and alcohol-related HIV/AIDS among women. She also serves on the Interagency Coordinating Committee on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (ICCFASD) and the NIH Coordinating Committee for Research on Women’s Health. Dr. Roach chairs the Women Drinking, and Pregnancy Work Group of the ICCFASD.

  • A New Paradigm for Old Epidemics: Updates in Hepatitis C and HIV (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.0 APA PRA Category 1™ credits while learning about the latest updates in treating patients with Hepatitis C and HIV, from this conference recording at the ASAM 47th Annual Conference. Acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections have increased 150% from 2010 to 2013 as reported by the Centers for Disease Control. A recent CDC health advisory noted that acute HCV infection is increasing especially among young nonurban persons who inject drugs. Regional HIV outbreaks have also been documented in this same population. In the midst of the current opioid epidemic, addiction treatment providers are uniquely positioned to fight the resurgence of HCV and HIV. Recently a new paradigm for the treatment of HCV has emerged, with higher virologic response rates, shorter treatment times, and improved safety profiles compared to older interferon-based drug regimens. The psychiatric side effects, intramuscular injection, and long treatment course so strongly associated with HCV treatment will likely become obsolete concerns. The HCV/HIV care continuum is concurrently being rapidly expanded to treat at-risk populations pre- and post-infection as well. This session will also update addiction treatment providers on the new Hepatitis C and HIV medications recently approved by the FDA.

    Overview

    Acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections have increased 150% from 2010 to 2013 as reported by the Centers for Disease Control. A recent CDC health advisory noted that acute HCV infection is increasing especially among young nonurban persons who inject drugs. Regional HIV outbreaks have also been documented in this same population. In the midst of the current opioid epidemic, addiction treatment providers are uniquely positioned to fight the resurgence of HCV and HIV. Recently a new paradigm for the treatment of HCV has emerged, with higher virologic response rates, shorter treatment times, and improved safety profiles compared to older interferon-based drug regimens. 

    The psychiatric side effects, intramuscular injection, and long treatment course so strongly associated with HCV treatment are becoming obsolete concerns. The HCV/HIV care continuum is concurrently being rapidly expanded to treat at-risk populations pre- and post-infection as well. This session will also update addiction treatment providers on the new Hepatitis C and HIV medications recently approved by the FDA.

    Learning Objectives

    At the end of the session participants will be able to: 

    1. Identify at-risk populations in need of evaluation and/or treatment for Hepatitis C and HIV. 
    2. Describe new pharmaceutical options for treating Hepatitis C and HIV to high risk patients. 
    3. Utilize new treatment algorithms in special populations that match treatment based on severity and type of illness. 

    Soraya Asadi

    MD, DABAM

    Soraya Asadi, MD, DABAM currently serves as Medical Director of the Opioid Treatment Program and as Medical Review Officer at Hines Veterans Administration Hospital in the near western suburbs of Chicago, IL. She completed her psychiatry residency at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO and her addiction psychiatry fellowship at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She is an assistant professor of psychiatry and program director of the addiction medicine fellowship at Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine in Maywood, IL. Dr. Asadi is board certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and the American Board of Addiction Medicine. She is a fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, a member of ASAM Women's Action Group, and an inaugural ambassador for Shatterproof, an organization dedicated to the prevention of addiction in adolescents and young adults. Her academic interests include theories of chronic pain, Spanish for medical professionals, and the integration of medicine and psychiatry.

    Oluwaseun Falade-Nwulia

    MBBS, MPH

    Oluwaseun Falade-Nwulia, MBBS, MPH, is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.She focuses her clinical pursuits on care of HIV and HCV infected patients and educating clinicians and public health practitioners about STDs, HIV, and hepatitis. Her research focuses on understanding the distribution and impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy on hepatitis B and C outcomes, and on improving HIV and hepatitis C (HCV) testing and access to care in medically underserved communities.

  • Disruptive Technology in Addiction Education: Integrating Multimedia Modules into Traditional Didactic Curricula (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 credits while reviewing this workshop, which is primarily focused on the use of technology in medical education to assist educators to engage residents and other trainees who may at times prefer to use multimedia learning modules outside the classroom or have these integrated into their education to a greater extent. There seems to be a gap at present in the use of such innovative teaching methods in medical education and narrowing this gap may help us employ more principles of adult learning theory in our teaching.

    Disruptive technology is reshaping both traditional industry as well as education (as evidenced by the rapid success of companies like Uber, AirBNB and Khan Academy), while traditional institutions can lag behind or even oppose such technology if they are unable to integrate it. One such technology gaining popularity in the education community are multimedia-based learning modules, utilizing video content with or without interactive features. In this workshop, participants will learn how to develop their own multimedia modules, as well as ways to integrate existing multimedia into traditional teaching settings. 

    After a brief review of adult learning theory, we will discuss ways educators can integrate “off-the-shelf" video resources (pre-made video content) into their didactics using the example of motivational interviewing. Next, we will briefly review options for software that educators can use to develop multimedia content (including non-proprietary software). Participants will then view a 2-minute multimedia module that we created using Powerpoint Mix to educate trainees on buprenorphine/naloxone induction, followed by an interactive demonstration of how this priming activity (similar to “pre-reading") can be used to make greater use of adult learning theory in classroom didactics. Finally, learners will be asked to brainstorm in small groups how they might integrate such technology into a didactic session they are planning at their home institutions.

    David Marcovitz

    MD

    David Marcovitz, M.D. is a PGY4 resident in psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital and McLean Hospital and a clinical fellow at Harvard Medical School. He will be staying at Partners Healthcare for his addiction psychiatry fellowship. He attended the Vanderbilt School of Medicine for medical school and Princeton University for his B.A.

    John Teal

    MD

    John Teal, MD, is an Instructor at McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School.

    Michael Bierer

    MD, MPH

    Michael F. Bierer MD MPH has been at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) for 30+ years. He holds the ranks of Physician there and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He completed his MD at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx NY in 1985 and his MPH at Harvard School of Public Health in Boston MA in 1989. He completed his Internal Medicine Residency at MGH in 1988 and participated in the Addiction Medicine Fellowship in the Department of Psychiatry at Boston University Medical Center in 2001. He ran the component of Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program based at MGH from 1989-2001, has been providing integrated care for addictions in a hospital-based primary care practice since 2002, and has been a leader in the education of medical housestaff at MGH about drug and alcohol problems. He is part of the new Substance Use Disorders Iinitiative at the hospital. He is former Secretary of MASAM and serves currently as President. He is one of the podcast voices for the New England Journal of Medicine.

  • Buprenorphine Dose and Treatment Outcomes: is 16 mg/day Enough? (1 CME)

    Contains 3 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Despite over 10 years of office-based treatment for opioid dependence, the optimal dose for buprenorphine therapy is still not known. In this focus session we will review existing evidence from the literature about the relationship between buprenorphine dose and treatment outcomes. We will then share results from our recent study that specifically addressed this question. We will then conclude with a discussion about optimal buprenorphine dosing for outpatient practice and methods for studying it.

    Focus Session Proposal:

    Office-based treatment for opioid dependence with buprenorphine has expanded access to treatment for individuals with opioid use disorders and has proven to be effective in a variety of settings. However, despite over 10 years of experience, there are still questions about the optimal dose for buprenorphine treatment. In this focus session, we will review existing evidence from the literature about the relationship between buprenorphine dose and physiologic measures and patient outcomes. Early studies suggested that doses of 8 to 16 mg per day of the the sublingual formulation should be sufficient and some insurers have limited access to doses higher that 16 mg/day as a result. Some guidelines have discouraged use of doses higher than 16 mg/day. However, there is growing clinical data that suggests that higher doses may lead to improved treatment retention and outcomes. This includes a recent study that we have conducted that specifically addressed this question. ¨The focus session with then conclude with an opportunity for discussion about optimal buprenorphine dosing for outpatient practice and methods for studying it. In this discussion, the relative risks and benefits of dose limits will be considered. Tension may exist between the goal of increasing treatment retention and the goal of minimizing drug diversion and cost, and these factors will be considered.

    Anthony J. Accurso, MD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine

    Anthony Accurso, MD, grew up in New York City and attended Hunter College High School. He received his B.A. with honors in Biology from Dartmouth College in 1999. He taught high school science for six years before enrolling in medical school. He completed medical school at SUNY Downstate, in Brooklyn NY in 2010. He completed his residency in Internal Medicine at Johns Hopkins Bayview in 2013, and then joined the faculty there. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Chemical Dependence. He is an ASAM member and passed the Addiction Medicine board exam in October 2015. He is also the faculty director of Providers for Responsible Ordering, a group that promotes high-value care.

    Darius Rastegar, MD, FASAM

    Associate Professor

    Dr. Rastegar provides treatment for substance use disorders in an outpatient primary care setting and an inpatient unit. He is an Associate Professor of Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and is the medical director for the Chemical Dependence Unit at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. He is the co-author of The ASAM Handbook of Addiction Medicine.

  • Implementing CONTINUUM: The ASAM Criteria Decision Engine(TM) in Your Practice and System (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    ASAM began addressing the adversarial prior authorization process with managed care with the 1991 ASAM Criteria. After 20 years of research, ASAM has released CONTINUUM – The ASAM Criteria Decision Engine™ nationwide. This workshop will provide the practical exposure to help active clinicians and program administrators understand how to organize, introduce and use this new clinical standard for success. The workshop will review counselor and patient evaluations from the alpha, beta and national demonstration projects. Attendees will review evaluation findings, the Harvard Business School study, the national survey of state requirements, and undergo a tour of the tool. The workshop will explain how to use CONTINUUM to address the federal Parity Act and the summer 2015 federal Medicaid specifications for external third party review of all substance use disorder placements. Attendees will assess the software’s ease of use, learning curve, impact on clinical assessment and potential for managed care reform. The discussion will examine the practical issues of HIPAA and 42cfr data privacy and how these support the national patient data registry.

    Addiction assessment is in a sorry state of affairs – there's literally no standard model. Counselors use an approach that might charitably be called “intuitive". As a result, managed care utilization review nurses keep demanding more data from treatment providers – and let the telephone tag begin. Then, there is the problem of proprietary medical necessity criteria, which gives managed care companies rampant control of access to care on the basis of cost, not quality. METHOD: ASAM began addressing this with the publication of its Patient Placement Criteria, beginning in 1991. After 20 years of research, over $8 million of research and validation, and support from SAMHSA, ASAM is releasing CONTINUUM – The ASAM Criteria Decision Engine™ to the entire US treatment field. This workshop will provide the practical explanation, background, and interview experience to help active clinicians and program administrators understand how to organize, introduce and use this new clinical standard for success. The workshop will review counselor and patient evaluations from the alpha, beta and national demonstration projects. RESULTS: Attendees will review recent findings that CONTINUUM's decision engine can effectively revolutionize or even eliminate telephone prior authorizations and utilization review, as predicted by a Harvard Business School study and as currently being considered by states and county Medicaid systems across the U.S. The Workshop will review findings from a national survey of state requirements of the ASAM Criteria (more than 30 require or endorse it) and which states, counties, managed care companies and healthcare systems have shown interest in or have already begun adopting CONTINUUM™. A tour of the tool will demonstrate the counselor-ready structured interview, the intricate branched-chain algebraic decision tree that implements every adult admission criteria decision rule in the current 2013 ASAM textbook, and how CONTINUUM finally standardizes medical necessity admissions criteria. The Workshop will explain how to use CONTINUUM to meet the new requirements of the federal Parity Act for publicly available medical necessity criteria and to meet the summer 2015 federal Medicaid specifications for state Medicaid 1115 Waivers, requiring independent, external third party review of all substance use disorder placements. DISCUSSION: Through the Workshop, attendees will gain their own perception of the software's ease of use, learning curve, impact on the clinical assessment process and impact on managed care reimbursement – with both public and commercial payers. Attendees will learn how treatment systems were able to implement CONTINUUM across all adult levels of care, even achieving mandated use across all clinicians. The discussion will examine the practical issues of HIPAA and 42cfr data privacy. Finally, attendees will assess the software's potential for nationwide adoption for addiction treatment evaluation, placement and periodic re-evaluation. This includes consideration of its potential for: reforming or eliminating telephonic prior authorization and utilization review, integrating with electronic health records, and establishing a national addiction patient clinical registry.

    David Gastfriend

    MD, DFASAM

    David R. Gastfriend, MD, served on the faculty of Harvard Medical School for 25 years, most recently as Director of the Addiction Research Program at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). His studies of the Patient Placement Criteria published by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) have been supported by the NIH's National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, U.S. state governments, managed care corporations, including Aetna Behavioral Healthcare, and foreign governments, including Belgium, Finland, Iceland, Israel, Norway, Switzerland, and the World Health Organization. The author of over 125 scientific publications, he has served on the Boards and Editorial Boards of a number of societies and journals, including ASAM and the International Society of Addiction Medicine (ISAM). He is co-editor of the leading book on treatment matching in the field, The ASAM Patient Placement Criteria for Substance-Related Disorders and editor of Addiction Treatment Matching. In addition to his role at RecoverySearch, Dr. Gastfriend is also Vice President for Scientific Communications at Alkermes, Inc. (NASDAQ: ALKS) where he is involved in research, education and scientific publication on extended-release naltrexone (VIVITROL®) and the company's efforts in the field of addiction treatment.

    Paul Earley

    MD, FASAM

    Dr. Earley has been an Addiction Medicine Physician for 30 years. He treats all types of addictive disorders and specializes in the assessment and treatment of health care professionals. As a therapist, he works with patients already in recovery, providing long term therapy for those who suffer from this disease. His professional expertise extends to advocacy for professionals before agencies and licensing boards.

    Dr. Earley is a dynamic speaker and educator; he speaks and trains on topics of addiction, its treatment and addiction among health care professionals. In addition, he trains therapists about the neurobiological basis of addiction and psychotherapy. In his travels, he has provided training in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Italy and Switzerland.

    He is the author numerous books and articles on addiction and its treatment, including The Cocaine Recovery Book. He has contributed to the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) Textbook: Principles of Addiction Medicine, as author of the chapter: Physician Health Programs and Addiction among Physicians. He is also a minor author to the ASAM Criteria.

    His work was featured in the documentary series on addiction entitled Close to Home by Bill Moyers. Dr. Earley is a Fellow of ASAM and has been on the board of ASAM for over 14 years in several capacities and is currently a director-at-large. He has been the Medical Director of two nationally acclaimed addiction programs specializing in the care of addicted health care professionals. Currently, he is the Medical Director of the Georgia Professionals Health Program, Inc. and a principal with Earley Consultancy, LLC, a training and consulting firm.

    David Mee-Lee

    MD, FASAM

    David Mee-Lee, M.D. is a board-certified psychiatrist, and is certified by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Based in Davis, California, he trains and consults both nationally and internationally.  Dr. Mee-Lee is Chief Editor of the American Society of Addiction Medicine's (ASAM) Criteria for the Treatment of Addictive, Substance-Related, and Co-Occurring Conditions and is President of DML Training and Consulting. He is co-founder of the Institute for Wellness Education. Dr. Mee-Lee has forty years of experience in person centered treatment and program development for people with co-occurring mental health and substance use conditions.

    Desiree Crevecoeur-MacPhail

    PhD

    Desirée A. Crèvecoeur-MacPhail, Ph.D. received her doctorate from Claremont Graduate University in social psychology and master's degree in clinical psychology from Pepperdine University. She has worked in program evaluation for almost 20 years with various institutions examining areas as diverse as substance use disorder treatment, “housing first” programs, anti-hate violence/anti-discrimination educational interventions in high schools and student satisfaction with graduate school. She has worked at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Integrated Substance Abuse Programs (ISAP) as a project director and research psychologist for over 15 years and is currently the Principal Investigator of the Los Angeles County Evaluation System: An Outcomes Reporting Program examining treatment engagement, retention and performance management. Dr. Crèvecoeur-MacPhail has worked with OPCC (formerly Ocean Park Community Center) as an external evaluator for several years. She is the author of over 24 papers and book chapters on topics including the treatment system in Los Angeles County, the impact of substance withdrawal on the body, how addiction affects the brain, addiction medications, the increase in use of methamphetamine for American Indians and Latinos, substance use disorder treatment effectiveness, health disparities, and program evaluation. She works with federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) to assess and improve treatment integration. She has extensive experience in health research, including quantitative and qualitative methods and outcomes measurement. In addition to her research, Dr. Crèvecoeur-MacPhail has taught at a number of colleges and universities including UCLA, California State University Dominguez Hills, Chapman University and Claremont Graduate University.

  • Payment for Addiction Medicine Services- ASAM Advocacy in Action (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    This session will provide an overview of the health care financing system in the United States as related to health plan coverage of addiction medicine services, as well as describe more efficient and effective ways to manage the prior authorization process in your practice. Learn how insurers make coverage decisions, what types of payment models exist, and what that insurance card in your wallet really means.

    Are you tired of spending hours filling out prior authorization forms only to be denied coverage? Are you puzzled as to why people can pay premiums but not have addiction services covered, even after “parity"? Do you wonder what that insurance card in your wallet really means? ASAM has a newly developed Payer Relations Committee to address a multitude of payment issues. In order to advocate for our profession, our practices, and our patients to access payments for addiction treatment services, we must start by understanding the system in place. This workshop will begin by providing an overview of the health care financing system in the United States as related to health plan coverage of addiction medicine services, how insurers make coverage decisions, and what types of payment models exist. We'll discuss efficient and effective ways for addiction physicians to handle the prior authorization and other processes with payers - what does and does not work to get coverage approvals. And we will discuss the mission of the new Payer Relations Committee and the many areas for improvement you can help identify.

    H. Westley Clark

    MD, JD, MPH, CAS, FASAM

    Dr. H. Westley Clark, Director of the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, leads the agency's national effort to provide effective and accessible treatment to all Americans with addictive disorders. Dr. Clark was the former chief of the Associated Substance Abuse Programs at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center (DVAMC) in San Francisco, California and a former associate clinical professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of California at San Francisco (UCSF). In addition to his duties at the DVAMC, Dr. Clark served as a senior program consultant to the Robert Wood Johnson, Substance Abuse Policy Program, a co-investigator on a number of the National Institute on Drug Abuse-funded research grants in conjunction with UCSF.

    Dr. Clark is a noted author and educator in substance abuse treatment, anger and pain management, psychopharmacology, and medical and legal issues. He has received numerous awards for his contributions to the field of substance abuse treatment, including a 2008 President of the United States Rank of Distinguished Executive Award in recognition of his personal commitment to excellence in government and public service; and a 2003 President of the United States of America Rank of Meritorious Executive Award in the Senior Executive Service for his sustained superior accomplishments in management of programs of the United States Government and for noteworthy achievement of quality and efficiency in the public service, 2003. In addition, he was awarded the 2008 John P. McGovern Award from the American Society of Addiction Medicine for his contributions toward increased understanding of the relationship between addiction and society.

    Other awards include the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary's Award for Distinguished Service far exceeding Departmental standards of achievement by exhibiting outstanding teamwork and timeliness on the complex task of completing the Methadone Final Rule which required coordination among several Federal agencies, 2001; Vernelle Fox Award from the California Society of Addiction Medicine for excellence in Addiction Medicine, Education and Public Service, 2000.

    Dr. Clark received a B.A. in Chemistry from Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan; he holds a Medical Degree and a Masters in Public Health from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; where he completed a Psychiatric Residency at University Hospital, Neuropsychiatric Institute. He obtained his Juris Doctorate from Harvard University Law School and completed a two-year Substance Abuse Fellowship at the DVAMC-SF. Dr. Clark received his board certification from the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology in Psychiatry and sub-specialty certification in Addiction Psychiatry. Dr. Clark is licensed to practice medicine in California, Maryland, Massachusetts and Michigan. He is also a member of the Washington, D.C., Bar Association.

    Kelly Clark

    MD, MBA, DFASAM, DFAPA

    Dr. Kelly J. Clark is the President Elect of ASAM. She currently chairs the Public Policy Council, consisting of the Legislative Advocacy, Payer Relations, and Public Policy Committees.

    Board certified in addiction medicine and psychiatry, she has focused her career on issues of prescription drug abuse, evidence informed behavioral health care, and payment reform. Dr. Clark is Chief Medical Officer of CleanSlate Centers, a multi-state medical group currently treating over 5,000 opioid addicted patients with medication management, and which has received a SAMHSA Science to Service Award for Office Based Opioid Treatment. She is active on the Association of Managed Care Pharmacy's Addiction Treatment Advisory Group; served on the writing committee of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's recent policy document, “The Prescription Drug Epidemic: An Evidence Based Approach”; and led the workgroup on Health Systems and Reimbursement at SAMHSA's Buprenorphine Summit.

    As the Behavioral Health Medical Director of CDPHP, a non-profit health plan in New York, she provided the clinical leadership for in-sourcing the management of behavioral health benefits. As Chief Medical Officer for Behavioral Health Group, she again focused on opioid addiction. Her expertise in payment models, quality metrics, medical-behavioral health integration, and clinical care delivery systems, as well as her clinical work treating people with addictive disease, all allow her to offer insights and recommendations to address the current epidemic.

    As faculty of the University of Massachusetts Medical School for eight years, Dr. Clark trained students and resident physicians on addiction. She is currently a member of the American Psychiatric Association's Integrated Care Work Group; the National Rx Drug Abuse Summit Advisory Board; and the faculty of the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine.

  • A New World: Update on Recognizing ADM as an ABMS Subspecialty (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1™ credits while learning about a brief chronology of the origins and current status of the field of addiction medicine. The speakers will also provide an update on the recognition process underway at the time of this presentation. The process of recognition of a new medical field by the American Board of Medical Specialties will be reviewed, with attention to the impact of recognition on existing diplomates and future examination applicants.

    In 1954 Dr. Ruth Fox in New York City set the foundation for the present field of addiction medicine (ADM) when she established the organization now known as the American Society Addiction Medicine (ASAM). ASAM began pursuing recognition for addiction medicine within organized medicine in 1991. In 2007 the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) was established with the encouragement and facilitation of ASAM, and ABAM then began addressing and fulfilling the recognition requirements by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS)for recognition of the field. By mid-2015 these requirements, which included the establishment of a sufficient number of ADM fellowships, had been fulfilled. ABAM held multiple meetings with ABMS and its member boards. ABPM submitted an application to ABMS for recognition of ADM in May, 2015. A brief history of ABMS, its mission, function and processes, as well as information about its member boards will be reviewed. The history, structure and function of ABPM will be reviewed, with attention to the format and expectations for the new subspecialty. At the time this abstract was submitted, the application from ABPM to ABMS was still under consideration. It is expected that addiction medicine will be a multi-specialty subspecialty open to any physician holding an ABMS primary certificate. There is typically a five-year practice pathway for physician certification in a new field before an ACGME accredited ADM fellowship is required. In this session, ABAM representatives will bring the audience up to date on this process and its outcome. Also covered will be the multiple impacts of formal recognition by ABMS. These include new accommodations expected by health care systems and third party insurers; changes in the education and training environments of all physicians; accreditation of ADM fellowships by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical education; the status and future of current ASAM and ABAM certificates; expected eligibility requirements for future ADM certification examinations; anticipated requirements for an ADM MOC program; and a brief history of ACGME, its mission, functions and processes will be reviewed. the importance of ASAM as the leadership organization for physicians practicing addiction medicine. The addiction medicine subspecialty will need a pipeline for fellowship trained physicians, and the ACGME requirements for fellowship accreditation and the plan to establish additional ADM fellowships will be presented. The current fellowships accredited by The ABAM Foundation will be reviewed, with attention to their faculty, fellows and curriculum. The purposed and activities of the ADM Fellowship Director's group will be presented. The session will conclude with a question and answer section.

    Robert Sokol

    MD

    Dr. Robert J. Sokol currently serves as a Distinguished Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Physiology and the John M. Malone, Jr., M.D., Endowed Chair and Director of the C.S. Mott Center for Human Growth and Development at Wayne State University in Detroit, Mich. Dr. Sokol graduated with the highest distinction in philosophy and from medical school with honors from the University of Rochester in New York. After residency training at Washington University/Barnes Hospital in St. Louis, Mo., and after serving as Dr. Willard Allen's last executive Chief Resident, he served in the Air Force as a Major and then completed a fellowship at Maternal-Fetal Medicine, as well as joining the faculty, first at the University of Rochester and then at Metrohealth/Case Western Reserve in Cleveland. He worked his way up to Professor and Director of the Perinatal Clinical Research Center. Recruited as Chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Wayne State University School of Medicine/Detroit Medical Center in 1983, he served as Dean and Senior Vice President for Medical Affairs from 1988 until 1999. Dr. Sokol is an internationally recognized expert in the area of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. In 1986, he established and directed the National Institutes of Health-funded WSU Fetal Alcohol Research Center, the only center of its kind in the country at the time. He is currently focused on risk detection and prevention methodology. He is Project Manager II for services in support of the Perinatology Research Branch of the NICHD and was the founding Chair of a University Department of Clinical and Translational Science. He has about 335 referreed papers and about 1500 total publications. He is President Elect of the American Board of Addiction Medicine.

    Patrick O'Connor

    MD, MPH, FACP

    No Biography

    Louis E. Baxter, Sr.

    MD, DFASAM

    Dr. Louis E. Baxter, Sr., MD, DFASAM is a Past ASAM President and is the President &CEO of thr Professional Assistance Program of New Jersey, Inc.

    Dr. Baxter is a certified in Addiction Medicine by the American Board of Addiction Medicine and formerly served on the Board of Directors. Dr. Baxter has served and chaired many government advisory committees and panels which include SAMHSA, NIDA, CSAT, NIAAA, and a Presidential Advisor through ONDCP since the Clinton Administration.

    Dr. Baxter has served the State of New Jersey in various capacities serving on the Governor's Council for Drug and Alcohol Addiction, Medical Director for the Division of Addiction Services, and most recently as the Addiction Medicine Consultant for the Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services. He has held academic appointments as Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine for former University Medicine & Dentistry and now currently with Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in Newark, NJ. Dr. Baxter is serving as Co-Director if the Addiction Medicine Fellowship Program at Howard University Medical School and Hospital.

    Kevin Kunz

    MD, MPH, DFASAM

    Kevin Kunz, M.D., M.P.H., DFASAM is Executive Vice President of the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) and The ABAM Foundation. He served as ABAM President from 2008-2011, and previously served as an ASAM Director and Chair of the ASAM Chapters Council. He was Co-chair of the ASAM Medical Specialty Action Group, which recommended that an independent medical board be established to expand the formal involvement of the larger medical community and all of health care in the prevention and treatment of addiction.

    William Greaves

    MD. MSPH

    Executive Director, ABPM

  • Developing Fellowship Training Programs to Meet Workforce Needs (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 3 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 credit while learning how specialized physician training is the sine qua non of every medical specialty and sub-specialty. Considerable opportunity exists for academic and community physicians who are interested in taking a place in addiction medicine’s future leadership by building new fellowship training programs.

    Specialized physician training is the sine qua non of every medical specialty and sub-specialty. Addiction Medicine is entering a new phase as its fellowship training programs, which have played a central role in the discipline's steady progression toward recognition, assume increasing responsibility for meeting the nation's addiction workforce needs. The more than three dozen fellowships that have been accredited so far by The Addiction Medicine Foundation have laid the groundwork for a national training infrastructure. These programs represent only the first wave toward achieving a target training capacity that is estimated to be in the range of 200-300 fellowship graduates per year. Considerable opportunity exists, therefore, for academic and community physicians who are interested in taking a place in addiction medicine's future leadership by building new fellowships. This interactive workshop will equip participants with a step-by-step road map for fellowship development, including identifying key team members, cultivating relationships with institutional partners, and designing clinical and didactic curricula. The requirements for fellowship accreditation will be explained, and particular attention will be devoted to the policies of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). Concrete examples will be provided from operating fellowships so participants will have a better understanding of key issues such as rotation design and budgeting. The importance of incorporating prevention and early intervention into training will be explained, and Addiction Medicine Foundation representatives will also offer updates on recent developments that have implications for areas such as fellowship funding. The workshop, therefore, will be of value to administrators and other health professionals, as well as physicians. Questions and open discussion will be encouraged throughout, and participants who wish will be linked with the Addiction Medicine Foundation's National Center for Physician Training in Addiction Medicine for ongoing technical assistance with fellowship development.

    Richard Blondell

    MD, MPH, FASAM

    Richard Blondell graduated from the University of Rochester school of medicine In 1978, and completed a family medicine residency at the University of Louisville in 1981. Following some time in private practice, he returned to the University of Louisville in 1985 and served as the director of the residency program from 1989 until 1997. After a sabbatical, he completed the certification requirements of the American Society of Addiction Medicine in 1998. Subsequently, he developed and directed a consult service on addiction medicine at the University of Louisville Hospital from 1998 to 2003. In 2003 he moved the University of Buffalo to pursue research interests in addiction medicine. He has served as a member of the Board of Directors of the American Board of Addiction medicine since 2007 and coordinates the Addiction Medicine Fellowship accreditation activities for ABAM-Foundation. No disclosures

    Kevin Kunz

    MD, MPH, DFASAM

    Kevin Kunz, M.D., M.P.H., DFASAM is Executive Vice President of the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) and The ABAM Foundation. He served as ABAM President from 2008-2011, and previously served as an ASAM Director and Chair of the ASAM Chapters Council. He was Co-chair of the ASAM Medical Specialty Action Group, which recommended that an independent medical board be established to expand the formal involvement of the larger medical community and all of health care in the prevention and treatment of addiction.

    Randall Brown

    MD, PhD, DFASAM

    Dr. Brown is on the Board of Directors of The Addiction Medicine Foundation and is President-Elect of the Addiction Medicine Fellowship Directors Association. He is Board Certified in Family Medicine and Addiction Medicine. He has been heavily involved in fellowship development at the program for which he was the founding Director at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, as well as at the national level. He serves as a consulting physician in addiction medicine at UW Hospital (where he is the Director of the Center for Addictive Disorders), William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, the UW Hospital HIV/AIDS Clinic, and at Access Community Health Centers (a network of Federally Qualified Health Centers). Dr. Brown is also the Director of the UW SMPH fourth year Clinical Addiction Elective, and the Medical Director of the Overdose Prevention Program of the AIDS Resource Center of Wisconsin. Dr. Brown holds a PhD in Population Health Sciences from the University of Wisconsin.

    Andrew Danzo

    BA

    Mr. Danzo is Coordinator of the ABAM Foundation National Center for Physician Training in Addiction Medicine. He is also Associate Director of Program Development in the University at Buffalo Primary Care Research Institute and research instructor in the University at Buffalo Department of Family Medicine.