Pharmacotherapy Studies to Prevent Opioid Relapse Following Jail Release: Lessons Learned (1.5 CME)

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(1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:


Opioid use disorder (OUD) in US jail populations is a major public health concern. Individuals with OUD who do not receive treatment during incarceration have high rates of relapse and are exposed to increased risk of overdose death upon release. Despite the proven effectiveness of methadone and extended release naltrexone treatment for OUD, these medications are rarely initiated prior to release from jail. The National Institute on Drug Abuse funded a cooperative study consisting of three randomized clinical trials to examine the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy initiated prior to release from jails in Albuquerque, NM, Baltimore, MD, and New York, NY. These studies randomly assigned opioid-addicted adults in jail to begin: methadone treatment with or without patient navigation, or an enhanced treatment as usual condition (in Baltimore, N=225); to extended release naltrexone with and without patient navigation, or enhanced treatment as usual (in Albuquerque, N=150); and, to extended release naltrexone or enhanced treatment as usual (in New York, N=255). This series of presentations will outline the scope of the opioid addiction problem in jails, the rationale and use of these medications in jails, challenges in implementing these approaches in jail and post-release, and medical and psychiatric co-morbidities in this patient population.  Main results to date will be presented, including: patient willingness to be treated, rates of study treatment retention after release, and community drug treatment outcomes. Audience discussion surrounding opioid treatment in criminal justice settings will be encouraged.

Learning Objectives:


1.) Participants will be able to list three challenges to implementing pharmacotherapy for opioid addiction in jails.
2.) participants will be able to describe the benefits of providing methadone and extended release naltrexone prior to release from jail.
3.) participants will be able to describe the role of patient navigation in linking patients to opioid addiction treatment across the jail to community treatment chasm.


Robert P. Schwartz

MD

Dr. Schwartz is a psychiatrist and Medical Director of the Friends Research Institute. He is Co-Principal Investigator of the Mid-Atlantic Node of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network. He has studied pharmacotherapy for Opioid Use Disorder in the community and in jail and prison through numerous NIDA grant award and has over 150 scientific publications. Dr Schwartz is Associate Professor of Psychiatry and is the recipient of the Dole-Nyswander Award from the American Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependence.

Joshua D. Lee

MD, MSc, FASAM

Joshua D. Lee MD, MSc is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Population Health and Medicine at the NYU School of Medicine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Addiction Medicine and is a physician at Bellevue Hospital Center, NYU Langone Medical Center, and in the NYC jails. He directs the NYU ABAM Fellowship in Addiction Medicine. His research focuses on novel and medication treatments for addiction among criminal justice and primary care populations.

ACCME Accredited with Commendation

ACCME Accreditation Statement

The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

AMA Credit Designation Statement

The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

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Session Recording
Open to view video.
Open to view video. This session was recorded on 4/5/19 in Orlando, FL
CME Quiz
3 Questions  |  10 attempts  |  2/3 points to pass
3 Questions  |  10 attempts  |  2/3 points to pass Complete the quiz to claim CME.
CME Evaluation
15 Questions
15 Questions Please complete the evaluation to claim CME.
CME Credit and Certificate
Up to 1.50 medical credits available  |  Certificate available
Up to 1.50 medical credits available  |  Certificate available 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits