Opioid Use Disorders and the Americans with Disabilities Act: Eliminating Discriminatory Barriers to Treatment and Recovery (1.5 CME)

(1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn from an attorney from the Disability Rights Section in the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division will present on “Opioid Use Disorders and the Americans with Disabilities Act: Eliminating Discriminatory Barriers to Treatment and Recovery.” Among the topics discussed will be the Civil Rights Division’s response to the opioid epidemic; an Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) overview; the ADA’s application to and protections for people with substance use disorders and opioid use disorders; and how to file a complaint about disability discrimination with the Department.

Elizabeth Westfall

JD

Elizabeth Westfall, Deputy Chief, Disability Rights Section, Civil Rights Division, U.S. Department of Justice

Elizabeth Westfall is a deputy chief of the Disability Rights Section in the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice.  Ms. Westfall leads the Section’s initiative under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to combat discrimination against people with opioid use disorder who are in treatment or recovery.  She also leads the Section’s enforcement of the ADA’s integration mandate.  

From 2010 until 2015, Ms. Westfall served as a trial attorney in the Civil Rights Division’s Voting Section, where she litigated cases under the Voting Rights Act.  Prior to the Voting Section, Ms. Westfall held positions with non-profit civil rights organizations and a civil rights law firm in Washington, DC, where she litigated voting rights, fair housing, and employment discrimination cases.  Ms. Westfall is a graduate of Harvard Law School and Carleton College.

ACCME Accredited with Commendation

ACCME Accreditation Statement

The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

AMA Credit Designation Statement

The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

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Session Recording
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CME Quiz
3 Questions
3 Questions Quiz contains 3 questions and requires 2 correct answers to pass.
CME Evaluation
15 Questions
CME Credit and Certificate
Up to 1.50 medical credits available  |  Certificate available
Up to 1.50 medical credits available  |  Certificate available 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™