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ASAM 49th Annual Conference - Innovations in Addiction Medicine and Science - 2018 (63 CME)


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The ASAM 49th Annual Conference is the nation’s premiere conference on the latest science, research, best practices and innovations in addiction medicine. The 2018 program includes more education offerings such as; seven concurrent sessions offerings at a time instead of six, three pre-conference courses instead of two.  There will also be three Plenary Sessions that include the popular Opening Plenary Session and Policy Plenary Session and new this year the National Perspectives Plenary Session moderated by the ASAM president with leaders from national federal agencies. There will be other exciting changes to provide learning in a more interactive, casual and fun environment. 

Learning Objectives:

At the conclusion of the conference, participants should be able to:

  • Identify and describe the new developments affecting the science, policy, and clinical practice of addiction medicine.
  • Compare presented clinical guidelines/best practices with the participant's current practice and identify strengths or gaps.
  • Analyze new research and science to develop practical applications for treatment or further research.
  • Explain recent or upcoming policy changes and identify implications or areas for provider involvement.
  • Create a network of professionals or a set of resources that can be used to support the participant's practice.


 

  • Evaluation and Certificate - ASAM 49th Annual Conference

    Contains 2 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    CME Evaluation for the ASAM 49th Annual Conference - Innovations in Addiction Medicine and Science

    Download the CME Tracking Sheet to assist with recording sessions attended at the conference. Complete the course evaluation first and then claim credits. Attendees should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

  • Move from Good to Great Presentations: Audience Aboard, Not Bored (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning how to enhance your presentation skills from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018). This session was made available free of charge by the ASAM Medical Education Council until 11/16/18.

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn about how great presentations are the result of knowledge, skills, and resources that can be applied in any type of educational setting. This workshop will feature brief didactic information to enhance knowledge with tips on how to master stage presence, gain and hold audience attention, avoid distracting mannerisms and movements, and manage difficult audiences. 

    • The "rule of three" and elements that characterize an effective presentation will be described: tell 'em what you're going to tell 'em, tell 'em, tell 'em what you told them. 
    • Effective vs. ineffective slides will be illustrated, and the incorporation of other visual resources to motivate audience learning will be highlighted. 
    • The workshop will conclude with the audience members forming dyads, wherein each member will make a brief presentation in their area of expertise to the other, who will, in turn, provide feedback. 
    • As a concluding activity, two to three volunteers will be asked to make their presentation for the entire audience, and a group discussion with feedback will be led by the audience and leaders. 

    The session incorporates humor, which not only makes the workshop a fun experience, but also eases any "jitters" and apprehension among the audience members. Residents and fellows might especially benefit from this workshop, but anyone who wants to move from making good presentations to great presentations will find this workshop to be of value.

    Marcia Jackson

    PhD

    Dr. Marcia Jackson is President of CME by Design, a consulting group that provides the full range of instructional design services in the field of continuing medical education. Dr. Jackson served as division vice president and senior advisor for education at the American College of Cardiology from 1992-2007. She is a past President of the Alliance for Continuing Medical Education, a past member of the National Task Force on CME Provider/Industry Collaboration, and current chair of the Medscape Education Advisory Board, She is a recipient of the ACCME Robert Razskowski Award and the Alliance for CME Distinguished Service Award.  She has been an ASAM consultant since 2013.

    Mike Monahan

    MEd, RN

    Mike Monahan MEd, RN  President, Healthcare Resources Associates.  Mike provides performance improvement coaching, consulting and training serving the learning and development needs of individuals, teams, and organizations primarily in healthcare.  He has developed a particular interest in the needs of leaders facing the personal and professional challenges of today’s workplace.  He has been focusing on helping teams and individuals improve measurable performance and tend to the human side of work relationships.  Mike serves as a faculty development consultant for the American College of Cardiology and Mayo.  Mike is a frequent speaker at professional conferences and has published in journals as well as co-authoring several books.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

  • Addiction Medicine Fellowships – Welcome to the New Era of ACGME (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™, while learning from experts in Addiction Medicine Fellow education, presenting the latest details on what is needed to design a fellowship that can successfully join the ranks of ACCME training programs, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn how this year will mark the historic debut of the first addiction medicine fellowship programs to operate under the flag of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). As this workshop takes place, the inaugural period of ACGME application submissions will have just started, based on policies and an application form that were finalized only two months ago. This workshop, therefore, is a unique and timely opportunity to learn the latest details on what is needed to design a fellowship that can successfully join the ranks of ACGME training programs. To date, nearly 50 fellowships have been started under the auspices of The Addiction Medicine Foundation (TAMF), and many of those are now in the first round of applicants for ACGME accreditation. At least another 75-80 new fellowships must be developed and accredited by 2025 to meet the projected need for addiction medicine physicians. This workshop, therefore, is designed for those addiction medicine champions interested in leading new fellowships, as well as for those from existing TAMF-accredited programs that are preparing for the transition to ACGME. 

    Presenters will include four addiction medicine educators who are leaders in TAMF and the Addiction Medicine Fellowship Directors Association (AMFDA), and who are also among those now drafting ACGME applications for their own fellowships. 

    Utilizing an interactive format of case study demonstration and dialogue, they will guide participants in planning strategies to design programs that are feasible within their home institutions and responsive to ACGME requirements. Breakout sessions will then enable participants to work in small groups on an actual ACGME application form, with presenters circulating to assist them in designing fellowship rotations that will build knowledge and skills in the core competencies of addiction medicine. Participants will then reassemble for a guided discussion to identify promising approaches that emerged in the application exercise, as well as to find solutions to any potential barriers that were encountered. At the workshop’s conclusion, arrangements will be made with interested participants for ongoing technical assistance from TAMF and AMFDA.

    Lon R. Hays

    MD, MBA, DFAPA, DFASAM

    Lon Roberts Hays, M.D., M.B.A. graduated from medical school at the University of Kentucky in 1982 then pursued residency training at the University of Kentucky, which he completed in 1986. At that time he joined the faculty in the Department of Psychiatry where he has served as Chair from 1998 to 2018, and is director of the Addiction Medicine Fellowship.  In addition to being Board Certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, Dr. Hays also is certified by the American Board of Addiction Medicine and has Added Qualifications in both Addiction Psychiatry and Geriatric Psychiatry. He completed a Certificate of Medical Management in 1998 and went on to obtain his M.B.A. from the University of Kentucky Gatton School of Business in May 2001.  Dr. Hays is a Co-investigator on numerous grants involving drugs of abuse.  He is the Director of Area V of the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry, President of the Addiction MedicineFoundation, a Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, and an elected member and Fellow of the American College of Psychiatrists."

    Randall Brown

    MD, PhD, DFASAM

    Dr. Brown is on the Board of Directors of The Addiction Medicine Foundation and is President-Elect of the Addiction Medicine Fellowship Directors Association. He is Board Certified in Family Medicine and Addiction Medicine. He has been heavily involved in fellowship development at the program for which he was the founding Director at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, as well as at the national level. He serves as a consulting physician in addiction medicine at UW Hospital (where he is the Director of the Center for Addictive Disorders), William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, the UW Hospital HIV/AIDS Clinic, and at Access Community Health Centers (a network of Federally Qualified Health Centers). Dr. Brown is also the Director of the UW SMPH fourth year Clinical Addiction Elective, and the Medical Director of the Overdose Prevention Program of the AIDS Resource Center of Wisconsin. Dr. Brown holds a PhD in Population Health Sciences from the University of Wisconsin.

    Timothy K. Brennan

    MD, MPH, FASAM

    Timothy Brennan, MD, MPH, FASAM is an Addiction Medicine physician and Pediatrician. He is the Director of the Addiction Institute at Mount Sinai West and St. Luke's Hospitals in New York City and the Vice President for Medical and Academic Affairs at The Addiction Medicine Foundation. He is also the Director of the Fellowship in Addiction Medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. He completed a Fellowship in Addiction Medicine at the Addiction Institute of New York, a Fellowship in Medical Ethics at Harvard Medical School, a Residency in Pediatrics at Weill Cornell Medical College / New York Presbyterian Hospital, and an Internship in Internal Medicine at Georgetown University Hospital. He is the Co-Editor of Essentials of Addiction Medicine and Board Certified in Addiction Medicine and Pediatrics.

    Jeanette M. Tetrault

    MD, FACP, FASAM

    Dr. Tetrault’s scholarly work focuses on care of patients with addicition and the medical co-morbidities associated with substance use, mainly HIV and Hepatitis C. She is a diplomate of the American Board of Addiction Medicine. Dr. Tetrault is a physician providing primary care and buprenorphine/naloxone treatment at the Central Medical Unit of the APT Foundation, a multi-specialty addiction treatment facility, and is an attending physician at Yale New Haven Hospital (YNHH). She is the co-director of the Addiction Recovery Clinic in the Adult Primary Care Clinic at the St. Raphael's Campus of YNHH, which serves both a clinical care and a teaching mission. She was selected as a Macy Foundation Faculty Scholar in 2017. She is the Program Director for the Yale Addiction Medicine Fellowship Program and serves on the Board of Directors for The Addiction Medicine Foundation and the Addiction Medicine Fellowship Directors Association. She is a past-president of the New England Region of SGIM and co-chair of the Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use Interest Group for SGIM.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of <<NUMBER OF CREDITS>> AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

  • Becoming Certified in Addiction Medicine through ABPM (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about Practice Pathways and Fellowships leading to board certified in Addiction Medicine, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will discover that in the spring of 2017, ABPM offered physicians who are certified by a Member Board of the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) the opportunity to apply and become certified in the subspecialty of Addiction Medicine. Marie A. Krousel-Wood, MD, MPH, ABPM Board Chair and Michael Weaver, MD, FASAM, Addiction Medicine Subboard Chair, will review the requirements and various pathways, i.e., Practice Pathway and Fellowship, available for physicians to apply for eligibility to sit for the Addiction Medicine subspecialty exam. Information on the timeline for the 2018 application cycle, dates for the examination period, and fee schedule will also be made available. Ample time will be provided for questions from the attendees. 

    For more information visit the ABPM website at www.theabpm.org.

    Christopher J. Ondrula

    JD

    Christopher J. Ondrula, is the Executive Director of the American Board of Preventative Medicine (ABMS).  Prior to joining ABMS in 2015, Mr. Ondrula served as the Chief Executive Officer and Director at Heartland Food Corporation, and the former Chief Operating Officer and General Counsel for Spence Group Services.

    A graduate of Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, Mr. Ondrula received his Juris Doctorate from Valparaiso University School of Law. Initially practicing in Chicago area law firms where his practice
    focused on the defense of medical malpractice claims and product liability litigation, he later joined the Arena Football League as its Assistant General Counsel.

    Michael F. Weaver

    MD, DFASAM

    Dr. Michael Weaver is Professor of Psychiatry and Medical Director of the Center for Neurobehavioral Research on Addiction at The University of Texas McGovern Medical School at Houston. He completed a Residency in Internal Medicine and a Clinical Research Fellowship in Addiction Medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University. He is involved in patient care, medical education, and research. Dr. Weaver has multiple publications in the field of addiction medicine. He treats patients at the Innovations Addiction Treatment Clinic at the Texas Medical Center in Houston, which provides medication-assisted treatment. He is the Sub-Board Chair for Addiction Medicine for the American Board of Preventive Medicine.  He is a member of the ASAM Publications Council and on the Editorial Board for the Journal of Addiction Medicine.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of <<NUMBER OF CREDITS>> AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

  • Hepatitis C Prevention, Management and Treatment for Addiction Medicine Practitioners (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ , while learning how to summarize and describe CDCs Hepatitis C testing and treatment guidelines, and describe successful models of programs in opioid substitution treatment programs and addiction treatment centers, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn that, globally, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major health issue among people who inject drugs (PWID). Within 1 year of injecting drugs, 1 of 3 individuals will become infected with HCV. Overall, 70 to 77% of PWID are HCV positive. There is a growing burden of HCV-related cirrhosis, liver cancer, and liver-related mortality, particularly among those infected for many decades. Perhaps even more concerning is the growing number of younger individuals newly infected with HCV through injection opiate use (Zibbell, 2014) (Colvin, 2010). 

    The advent of simple and well-tolerated oral HCV therapeutic regimens – direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) – with cure >95% has the potential to reverse the rising tide of advanced liver disease and with cure, prevent disease transmission (Grebely, 2017). These effective DAAs have eliminated interferon as a major barrier to HCV scale-up in PWID. 

    However, in order for these therapies to have an effect at a population-level, targeted interventions to enhance HCV testing, linkage to care, and treatment are needed. The reluctance to offer HCV therapy to PWID often still stems from concerns around treatment adherence, poorer outcomes, and the potential risk for HCV reinfection (Grebely, 2017). This reluctance exists despite growing evidence that HCV can be successfully treated among active drug users (Muething, 2015). 

    Furthermore, stigma and judgement regarding drug use and addiction among traditional HCV treaters has led to mistrust and reluctance to seek care by providers (Feller, 2013). This workshop will review the epidemiology of HCV among PWID, and effective strategies to enhance HCV testing, linkage to care and treatment for PWID. A particular focus will be given to the role of addiction medicine practitioners in preventing and treating HCV, especially in substance treatment facilities.

    Alain H. Litwin

    MD, MPH

    Alain Litwin, MD, MPH is Vice Chair of Academics and Research and Professor of Medicine at Greenville Health System, University of South Carolina School of Medicine – Greenville, and Clemson University School of Health Research where he is launching a Center for Addiction and Prevention Research.  He is board certified in internal medicine and addiction medicine, and has been providing medical care to people who use drugs with complex social, psychiatric and medical needs within an integrated primary care and substance use treatment program since 2000. As HCV Medical Director at Albert Einstein’s Division of Substance Abuse, he developed a comprehensive on-site HCV treatment program and peer educator program to improve medical care of HCV-infected people who use drugs. As HCV Treatment Network Director at Montefiore Medical Center, he expanded patient-centered models of care at many community health centers serving thousands of HCV-infected people throughout the Bronx.  With funding from NIH, PCORI, CMS, CDC, AHRQ, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, New York State Department of Health, New York City Department of Health, and industry, Dr. Litwin’s research has been focused on developing and studying models of HCV care, and on advocating for increasing access to effective care for all HCV-infected patients.  Dr. Litwin has worked with government and community organizations on efforts to expand access to HCV treatment and has collaborated on policy statements, clinical guidelines, treatment improvement protocols, task forces, and educational curricula with the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York State Department of Health, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, American Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependence, and the American Society of Addiction Medicine.  Dr. Litwin serves on the Executive Board for the International Network on Hepatitis in Substance Users (INHSU).

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

  • Opening Scientific Plenary & Distinguished Scientist Lecture (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while you learn about the incredible impact addiction medicine providers can have on an individual, policy, and the future of treatment and science, from this conference recording at The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018). This session was made available free of charge by ASAM.

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will be energized as Dr. Kelly J. Clark, MD, MBA, DFASAM, leads the Opening Scientific Plenary Session, focusing on the incredible impact addiction medicine providers can have on an individual, policy, and the future of treatment and science.

    Elinore F. McCance-Katz

    MD, PhD

    Elinore F. McCance-Katz, MD, PhD, is the first Assistant Secretary for Mental Health and Substance Use. She advises the Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary on improving behavioral healthcare in America and leads the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), an agency responding to the nation’s opioid crisis. Dr. McCance-Katz fervently supports evidence-based early intervention, treatment, and recovery services for people who have mental health and substance use disorders. Dr. McCance-Katz has more than 25 years of experience as a clinician, teacher, and researcher.

    Michael E. Charness

    MD

    Michael E. Charness, MD, became Chief of Staff for the VA Boston Healthcare System in 2003. His laboratory, with support from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the VA, studies the mechanisms of alcohol toxicity in the nervous system and the development of drugs that block alcohol toxicity. Dr. Charness is scientific director of the NIAAA-funded Collaborative Initiative on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, and chairs the external advisory board for the NIH-funded Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. He has cared for patients with neurological complications of alcohol use disorder and peripheral nerve disorders throughout his career.

    Judy Collins

    Singer/Songwriter, Musician

    Judy Collins is a modern-day renaissance woman who is also an accomplished songwriter, painter, filmmaker, record label head, musical mentor, and a high-demand speaker for mental health and addiction. She will share her story about addiction, personal triumph, how an addiction doctor helped her understand for the first time that she had a disease, and how she could get help and change her life. Ms. Collins continues to inspire audiences with sublime vocals, boldly vulnerable songwriting, and music of hope and healing that speaks to the heart.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

  • Opioid and Alcohol Use Disorders in Older Adults: Working Group Guideline Development (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about methods used to review literature on the assessment and treatment of alcohol and opioid use disorders in older adults from this conference recording at The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn how alcohol has now surpassed tobacco as the leading cause of hospital admission in some Canadian provinces, yet alcohol use disorders among those 65 and older often go unidentified and untreated. In addition, older adults are over-represented among Canadians who have had fatal or non-fatal opioid overdoses , yet identification and treatment of opioid use disorders as well as appropriate use of opioids for chronic non-cancer pain remain a challenge for many clinicians. 

    The Canadian Coalition for Seniors Mental Health (CCSMH) has been tasked by Health Canada to develop guidelines for the assessment and treatment of four substance use disorders in older adults (alcohol, opioids, cannabis, and benzodiazepines). As part of guideline development, input is needed from peers working and researching in the field. In this interactive workshop Drs. Rieb and Butt will present a brief overview of the methods used to review literature on the assessment and treatment of alcohol and opioid use disorders in older adults, then share draft guidelines developed by the working groups of the CCSMH. Workshop participants will be encouraged to give feedback and share clinical and research findings to augment the guidelines. Physicians, nurse practitioners, counselors, psychologists, researchers, administrators, and older adults in recovery are among those encouraged to attend for a lively discussion.

    Launette Marie Rieb

    MD, MSc, CCFP, FCFP, DABAM, FASAM

    Dr. Launette Rieb is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Family Practice at the University of British Columbia (UBC), Canada. She is a Family Physician and diplomat of The American Board of Addiction Medicine. She did her graduate work in the area of pain physiology. She completed a postgraduate UBC Clinical Scholar's Program in 2015 and a NIDA sponsored Canadian Addiction Medicine Research Fellowship in 2016 resulting in publication on a newly described opioid pain phenomenon - withdrawal-associated injury-site pain (WISP). She has also published on fentanyl and heroin overdose deaths in BC, as well as on addiction in a variety of marginalized populations. Dr. Rieb is the Medical Director of a multidisciplinary team at OrionHealth (Vancouver Pain Clinic), and works as a consultant for the Rapid Access Addictions Clinic at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver. In addition, she does addiction medicine consultations for The Orchard Recovery Centre, on Bowen Island. Dr. Rieb has taught addiction medicine in the undergraduate and postgraduate medical programs at UBC, and at national and international conferences for 24 years. Dr. Rieb was the co-creator and initial Physician Director of the St. Paul’s Hospital Goldcorp Addiction Medicine Fellowship (now the BC Centre on Substance Use Addiction Medicine Fellowship). She is a member of the Canadian Society of Addiction Medicine’s Education Committee and the College of Family Physician of Canada's Competency Creation Working Group for the Certificate of Added Competency in Addiction Medicine. Dr. Rieb is the past recipient of a UBC Faculty of Medicine Post Graduate Teaching Award. 

    Peter R. Butt

    MD, CCFP, FCFP

    Dr. Peter Butt is a graduate of McMaster University and a Certificant and Fellow with the College of Family Physicians of Canada.  He is an Associate Professor in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Saskatchewan in a position dedicated to Addiction Medicine, and serves as a consultant to Mental Health and Addictions in the Saskatoon Health Region.  National committee work includes the National Alcohol Strategy Advisory Committee, chair of the Canadian Alcohol Low Risk Drinking Guidelines Expert Advisory Group, co-chair of the Standard Drink Label Working Group, and member of the National Recovery Advisory Committee for the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse; and physician lead on the Alcohol Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral project for the College of Family Physicians of Canada.  Provincially he is the physician lead on the Saskatchewan provincial “Take Home Naloxone”project, chairs the Opioid Advisory Committee for the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Saskatchewan, and serves on the Health Canada - First Nation Prescription Drug Abuse Initiative.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of  1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

  • Using Alcohol Biomarkers to Guide Pharmacotherapy for Alcohol Use Disorder (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while reviewing the evidence for the use of phosphatidylethanol (PEth) and other biomarkers in the treatment of AUDs in persons living with HIV. Interventions will include both behavioral and pharmacological treatments, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn that clinicians can use several biochemical measurements to objectively assess patients’ current or past alcohol use. However, none of these currently available biomarkers, including measures of various liver enzymes and blood volume, are ideal. Several more experimental markers hold promise for measuring acute alcohol consumption and relapse. These include certain alcohol byproducts, such as phosphatidylethanol, acetaldehyde, ethyl glucuronide (EtG), and fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE), as well as two measures of sialic acid, a carbohydrate that appears to be altered in alcoholics.

    This symposium will provide an update on the use of alcohol biomarkers in general clinical practice, with special emphasis on:

    1. the use of alcohol biomarkers as a guide to the diagnosis and treatment of AUD in primary care settings; 
    2. the use of phosphatidylethanol (PEth) testing as a guide to treatment in patients with co-occurring HIV/AIDS and AUD; and 
    3. the use of alcohol biosensors to monitor response to treatment in both specialty and non-specialty treatment settings.

    Deidra Y. Roach

    MD

    Dr. Roach has more than 30 years of experience in the field of addiction treatment. She currently serves as a Program Director for the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism where, among other responsibilities, she manages research portfolios addressing the treatment of co-occurring mental health and alcohol use disorders and alcohol-related HIV/AIDS among women. She also serves on the Interagency Coordinating Committee on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (ICCFASD) and the NIH Coordinating Committee for Research on Women’s Health. Dr. Roach chairs the Women Drinking, and Pregnancy Work Group of the ICCFASD.

    Scott H. Stewart

    MD, MS

    Scott H. Stewart, MD, MS, Associate Professor, Division of General Internal Medicine, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo. 

    Dr. Stewart is a general internist and adult primary care physician, currently teaching and practicing at the Erie County Medical Center, an academic urban safety-net hospital in Buffalo, NY.   After graduating medical school at Temple University in 1993 and completing Internal Medicine training at the University of Pittsburgh in 1996,Dr. Stewart worked for three years in private practice in the beautiful state of Maine, then returned to academia and completed a health services research fellowship at MUSC in Charleston, SC. He has been on the faculty of MUSC and the University at Buffalo since 2001. Working with experienced mentors at the Charleston Alcohol Research Center at MUSC and Research Institute on Addictions in Buffalo early in his research career helped in melding his long-standing interest in alcohol-related problems with scholarly efforts, leading to NIAAA support. 

    Dr. Stewart believes that objective testing and monitoring is needed to optimize AUD treatment in primary care, similar to other chronic conditions such as diabetes and dyslipidemia. While traditional alcohol consumption biomarkers suffer from limited sensitivity or specificity, and self-report screens are subject to error, relatively newer biomarkers have great potential to guide AUD treatment. Accordingly, a point of my foci has been on the use of carbohydrate-deficient transferrin and newer biomarkers (e.g., blood phosphatidylethanol, ethyl glucuronide) in various patient populations and during alcoholism treatment trials. Dr. Stewart believes biomarker development is a complicated and slow process, but these and other laboratory tests will continue to alter how AUD is detected and monitored in medical settings in the coming years.

    Judith Hahn

    PhD

    Judy Hahn, PhD is an Associate Professor in the HIV, ID, and Global Medicine Division in the Department of Medicine at UCSF. She is an epidemiologist with extensive experience studying the behavioral and biological intersections of substance use and infectious diseases. She is a pioneer in the use of biological markers as objective measures for alcohol use. She has received numerous grant awards from the NIH and has published over 100 manuscripts. 

    She is currently leading studies to examine the safety and cost-benefit ratios of using isoniazid to prevent active TB among HIV/TB co-infected drinkers in Uganda, interventions to improve the safety of INH delivered to this population, as well as using mobile phones and tablets to reduce the harm associated with heavy alcohol use. Judy is also a long-time investigator on the UFO Study of HCV in young persons who inject drugs in San Francisco.

    M. Katherine Jung

    PhD

    M. Katherine Jung, PhD, is the Director of the Division of Metabolism and Health Effects (DMHE) in the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). DMHE oversees a portfolio on the role of alcohol on organ damage, and the mechanisms of alcohol’s effect on physiology and pathology. Dr. Jung’s training and research experience are in biochemistry, cell biology, and molecular biology. Her peer-reviewed publications span the the areas of alcohol-induced organ damage, cell biology, cancer biology, and drug discovery. She has a longstanding interest in biomarkers of alcohol consumption and of alcohol-associated organ damage. Dr. Jung co-leads the Wearable Alcohol Biosensor initiative for NIAAA.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of <<NUMBER OF CREDITS>> AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

  • Current Trends of Novel Psychoactive Substance Use and Abuse (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning that there continues to be widespread use of novel psychoactive substances (NPS) with the number of different novel active substances increasing worldwide every year, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn there continues to be widespread use of novel psychoactive substances (NPS) with the number of different novel psychoactive substances increasing worldwide every year. Understanding global trends is important as new agents are often used or “piloted” in other countries before they become popular in the United States. 

    Between the years of 2009 and 2016, 739 different NPS were reported by 106 countries to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNDOC) (“World Drug Report 2017” 2017). In 2015, the majority of NPS reported to UNODC were synthetic stimulants including cathinones and phenethylamines (36%) and synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists (32%) (“World Drug Report 2017” 2017) . Equally concerning is the occurrence of “mini epidemics” associated with synthetic drugs leading to hospitalization of multiple users at a time (Monte et al. 2014). 46 clusters of adverse drug events were reported in the US related to synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists between 2012 and 2015 (Trecki, Gerona, and Schwartz 2015). 

    Yet, identifying the drugs responsible for these “mini-epidemics” is often challenging due to the challenges involved with laboratory testing. Indeed patients in treatment for substance use disorders may be using NPS particularly due to the difficulty in detection (Wiegand 2015) as development of laboratory assays cannot keep up with the development of new substances, and cost of testing may be prohibitive to substance use disorder treatment centers. 

    Recognition of use of NPS is thus often based on clinical evaluation (Ninnemann et al. 2016), and best practices for treatment of acute toxicity or chronic use are not well defined (Monte et al. 2017; Ninnemann et al. 2016). It is important for providers in the field of addiction to understand the evolution of novel psychoactive substances, who is using them, signs and treatment of acute toxicity, available laboratory testing, and what is known about long-term sequelae from use of these agents including the potential for addictive disorders (Montanari et al. 2017) and withdrawal in chronic use (Nacca et al. 2013). This knowledge will allow providers to identify and manage patients at risk from complications of use of these substances.

    JoAn Laes

    MD

    JoAn Laes, MD, Attending Physician, Division of Addiction Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN; Core Medical Toxicology Faculty, Minnesota Poison Control System, Minneapolis, MN; Medical Director, Mission Detox Center, Plymouth, MN and 1800 Detox, Minneapolis, MN, ASAM Medical Toxicology workgroup Chair.Dr. Laes' practice is focused on inpatient addiction medicine and toxicology consultation and outpatient treatment of opioid and other substance use disorders. She is board certified in Internal Medicine, Addiction Medicine, and Medical Toxicology. She completed internal medicine residency at Hennepin County Medical Center and medical toxicology fellowship at Regions Hospital in St. Paul, Minnesota.

    Christine Murphy

    MD

    Dr. Christine Murphy is an Associate Professor in Emergency Medicine and Medical Toxicologist at Carolinas Healthcare System in Charlotte, North Carolina. Dr. Murphy is the Director for the Medical Toxicology Fellowship Program. She received both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in chemistry from the College of William and Mary and her medical degree from the Medical College of Virginia. She completed her residency training in Emergency Medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University and a fellowship in Medical Toxicology at Carolinas Medical Center. Dr. Murphy is board certified in Emergency Medicine, Medical Toxicology, and Addiction Medicine. Her current research interests include alternative uses for existing antidotes, pediatric addiction, and trends in recreational drugs of abuse.

    Matthew Peter Stripp

    MD

    Dr. Matthew Stripp is a Junior Faculty Member in Emergency Medicine and a Medical Toxicology Fellow at Carolinas Healthcare System in Charlotte, NC. He received his BA in Cell/Molecular Biology with an emphasis in Neuroscience at Washington & Jefferson College in Washington, PA. He received his medical degree at Temple University School of Medicine in Philadelphia, PA. He completed his residency training in Emergency Medicine at Northwell Health in Manhasset, NY. Dr. Stripp is board certified in Emergency Medicine. His current research interests include mushroom toxicity, synthetic cannabinoids, and other emerging drugs of abuse.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

  • Advocating for Treatment and Patients at the State Level (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning more about advocacy, legislative, and regulatory efforts on Addiction Medicine policy at the state and federal level from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn that with the opioid misuse and overdose epidemic continuing to progress across the country, federal and state governments alike are swiftly passing legislation and implementing regulations to address opioid prescribing, access to treatment, parity, and other issues that impact the addiction medicine field. 

    Since the beginning of 2017, the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) has dedicated resources to assisting our state chapters with responding to or leading these legislative and regulatory efforts at the state level. From submitting letters of support for and opposition to legislation, commenting on regulations and Governor initiatives, or testifying at committee hearings and agency meetings, ASAM members have been taking advantage of the opportunity to be a part of the discussion. 

    Several states have been more aggressive in addressing this issue than others and the ASAM chapters in those states have interacted with state legislators and agency officials more frequently this past year. Thus, these chapters have insight into how these processes and interactions work that can benefit other chapter officers and members. 

    This workshop will:

    1. review several case studies of state chapter advocacy action related to addiction medicine policy;
    2. review what chapter presidents did with regards to state advocacy, including how they engaged ASAM’s national office, their local members, and elected officials; how they worked with other local advocates and stakeholders to affect positive policy changes; 
    3. describe the overall successes experienced and improvements that are needed in advocacy at the state level.

    The workshop will close with a question-and-answer session that allows members in the audience to ask these chapter presidents for guidance and advice on how they and their chapters can be more engaged around state legislation and regulations on addiction medicine.  This is an opportunity for members to learn, first-hand, the best approaches to advocate for policy change that helps patients and provides addiction specialists the discretion to do their job in order to provide the highest quality treatment.

    Brad Bachman

    State Advocacy and Government Relations Manager

    Brad Bachman is the Manager of State Government Relations for the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM). Prior to joining ASAM, he was a legislative aide in the Maryland Senate and worked on several state and federal campaigns. At the beginning of his time at ASAM, Brad assisted the Director of Advocacy and Government Relations with tracking and responding to federal legislative and regulatory activity regarding the opioid epidemic, particularly the passage of the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act and the lifting of the buprenorphine patient limit to 275. Since the beginning of this year, he has taken over the expanded advocacy focus of ASAM to include legislative and regulatory responses to the epidemic at the state level. Working in tandem with ASAM state chapters, state medical associations, and other stakeholders, he is helping to ensure that any state law or regulation affecting the practice of addiction medicine or access to addiction treatment is guided by evidence and science. Brad received his bachelor degree in history and political science at The Colorado College.

    Cara A. Poland

    MD, MEd, DFASAM

    Cara Poland, MD, M.Ed, FACP, FASAM was trained in internal medicine at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital in Ann Arbor, Michigan and in addiction medicine at Boston Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts. She has an interest in educating physicians and physicians-in-training to improve care for patients with substance use disorders and alcohol use disorders. She is interested in medical student curriculum development and assessment, student well-being and identifying ways to improve the process of medical training. She is professionally active in multiple societies including acting as the current President of the Michigan Society of Addiction Medicine. She is currently the medical director of a program for treatment of pregnant women with substance use disorders, has a general addiction practice. She is an assistant professor at Michigan State University where she acts as a Learning Society Chief.

    Michael Bierer

    MD, MPH

    Michael F. Bierer MD MPH has been at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) for 30+ years. He holds the ranks of Physician there and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He completed his MD at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx NY in 1985 and his MPH at Harvard School of Public Health in Boston MA in 1989. He completed his Internal Medicine Residency at MGH in 1988 and participated in the Addiction Medicine Fellowship in the Department of Psychiatry at Boston University Medical Center in 2001. He ran the component of Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program based at MGH from 1989-2001, has been providing integrated care for addictions in a hospital-based primary care practice since 2002, and has been a leader in the education of medical housestaff at MGH about drug and alcohol problems. He is part of the new Substance Use Disorders Iinitiative at the hospital. He is former Secretary of MASAM and serves currently as President. He is one of the podcast voices for the New England Journal of Medicine.

    Mark Jorrisch

    MD, DFASAM

    Dr. Jorrisch earned an undergraduate degree in Biology from Union College, Schenectady, New York in 1973.  He went on to finish Medical School at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia in 1977 and completed his residency in internal medicine at the University of Virginia in 1980.  Dr. Jorrisch has had a private practice in internal medicine since 1980 in Louisville, Kentucky and currently has an Addiction Medicine practice with specialization in OAT, including methadone and buprenorphine. 

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME)

The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. 

The ASAM 48th Annual Conference - Innovations in Addiction Medicine and Science

The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 71 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (Tmoc)

This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM).  Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (Tmoc) Program can apply a maximum of 71 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing the The ASAM 48th Annual Conference – Innovations in Addiction Medicine and Science.

American Psychological Association (APA)

The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) Continuing Medical Education (CME) has been approved for renewal of certification by the APA College of Professional Psychology. ASAM CME credits may be applied toward the APA’s “Certificate of Proficiency in the Treatment of Alcohol and Other Psychoactive Substance Use Disorders.”

Continuing Education Credits (CEUs)

Non-physician participants will receive a certificate of attendance upon completion of the activity and an online evaluation confirming their participation. Participants should submit his/her certificate of attendance to their professional organization/institute.

CME Committee Members

  • Adam J. Gordon, MD, MPH, FACP, DFASAM, CMRO, Chair
  • Catherine Friedman, MD, FASAM, Vice-Chair
  • Noel Ilogu, MD, MRCP, FASAM
  • Herbert L. Malinoff, MD, FACP, DFASAM
  • Edwin A. Salsitz, MD, DFASAM
  • John C. Tanner, DO, CCFC, DFASAM

Staff - Sandy Metcalfe, Consultant, ASAM CME Committee, Professional Development Department

CME Committee, Program Planning Committee and Faculty Disclosure Information

In accordance with the disclosure policies of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the effort is made to ensure balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all educational activities. These polices include resolving all conflicts of interest between the CME Committee, planning committee and faculty, and commercial interests that might otherwise compromise the goal and educational integrity of this activity. All planning committee members and faculty participating in the activity have disclosed all relevant financial relationships with commercial interests. The ASAM CME Committee has reviewed these disclosures and determined that the planning committee and faculty relationships are not inappropriate in the context of their respective presentations and are not inconsistent with the educational goals and integrity of the activity.

Who Should Attend:

  • Physicians and Clinicians
  • Researchers and Academics
  • Counselors and Students
  • Other Health Care Professionals 

dedicated to increasing access and improving the quality of addiction treatment and care.