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  • Global Perspectives on Addiction Medicine/Addiction Physicians in Drug Abuse Epidemics (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about the work being done by ISAM and how it can help teach us about addiction in our own national setting from the 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    According to the World Drug Report of 2017, in 2015, ~250 million people used drugs, of which around 29.5 million people- or 0.6% of the global adult population-were engaged in problematic use and suffered from drug use disorders, including dependence. Opioids accounted for 70% of the negative health impact associated with drug use disorders worldwide. The current prescription opioid epidemic in the US has resulted in serious morbidity and mortality of an estimated 42,000 deaths in 2016 with a cost of $78.5 billion. This may be partly due to a few unscrupulous physicians who have over-prescribed large quantities of opioid pain medications, but the addiction medicine and addiction physicians/psychiatrists still play an important role in intervening with appropriate treatment and recovery programs for the patient with substance use disorder. There is a great deal we can learn from the nature of addiction and how it is addressed outside the United States. This symposium will give attendees a perspective on work going on within ISAM, and what it can teach us about addiction in our own national setting. The symposium will be co-moderated by Dr. Kelly Clark, President of ASAM, and the several speakers will present on many aspects of addiction medicine. Dr. Gregory Bunt (US) will discuss “The Four Bio-Psycho-Social-Spiritual Dimensions of Addiction: A Global Perspective”, Dr. Marc Galanter (US) will discuss “12-step Model: Comparison in the US and Iran”, Dr. Kathline Brady (US) will discuss “PTSD and substance use disorder”, and Dr. AlGhafri (Abu Dhabi, UAE) will discuss the “Developments in Addiction Medicine in the Middle East and Northern Africa”. This will be followed by a lively discussion.  



    Learning Objectives:

    1.) The participants will learn about: (a) the current status on opioid epidemic.   
    2.) The participants will learn about: the current interventions used for patients with substance use disorders   
    3.) The participants will learn about the role addiction medicine and addiction physicians/psychiatrists could play in dealing with serious drug epidemics.   



    Jag H. Khalsa

    MS, PhD

    Currently, Dr. Jag Khalsa serves as a Special Volunteer at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), NIH, after retiring on October 31, 2017 from NIDA as the Chief of the Medical Consequences of Drug Abuse and Infections Branch, NIDA, NIH, DHHS.  With 50+ years of experience in drug research, he was responsible for developing/administering a national and international program of clinical research on medical and health consequences of drug abuse and co-occurring infections (HIV, HCV, and others). Prior to joining NIDA in 1987, he served for ~10 yrs as a pharmacologist/toxicologist assessing safety (carcinogenic/teratogenic) potential of chemicals [INDs/NDAs] and food additives) and clinical evaluator at FDA. He has published in pharmacology, toxicology, epidemiology and medical journals. He serves on editorial boards of Journals of Addiction Medicine, Research on HIV/AIDS and Palliative Care, Frontiers of Neuroscience, and Clinical Infectious Diseases. He also served on numerous Federal and NIH level committees including the HHS Viral Hepatitis Implementation Group (VHIG), National Commission on Digestive Diseases and its two sub-committees (Liver Research, Diabetes Research), Federal Task Force on TB, NIH Steering Committee on Centers for AIDS Research, and Human Microbiome Workgroup. He has received distinguished service awards from the FDA Commissioner, NIDA and NIH Directors, Society of Neuro-Immune-Pharmacology (SNIP), Life Time Achievement Awards from SNIP and International Conference on Molecular Medicine (India) and MIT, India; a commendation from the US Congress, Awards of Merit from the International Society of Addiction Medicine (ISAM), the President of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), and a Certificate of Appreciation from the Office of Assistant Secretary for Health (Drs. Howard Koh and Ron Valdiserri), DHHS. He has a Ph.D. in neuro-psycho-pharmacology, a Master’s degree in herbal pharmacology, post-doctoral training in CNS/Cardiovascular pharmacology at SK&F, and Toxicology at SRI International. E-mail: jag.khalsa@nih.gov; personal e-mail: jkhalsa@yahoo.com

    Gregory Bunt

    MD, FASAM, FISAM

    Dr. Gregory Bunt graduated medical school in 1983 from NYU School of Medicine, and completed his residency in Psychiatry at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in 1987. He was among the first to complete the Fellowship in Addiction Psychiatry at NYU School of Medicine (1989), and has since been on the NYU Medical School Faculty in the Division of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse, currently as an Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry. He is a diplomat of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology with Special Added Qualifications in Addiction Psychiatry and a Fellow of the International Society of Addiction Medicine.Dr. Bunt is the Immediate Past President of the New York Society of Addiction Medicine and the Immediate Past President of the International Society of Addiction Medicine. He has been the Medical Director for Daytop Village and Daytop International for over 25 years. He has authored over a dozen publications, and speaks nationally and internationally about addiction medicine and therapeutic communities.

    Marc Galanter

    MD, DFASAM

    Marc Galanter, M.D., is a Professor of Psychiatry at NYU, Founding Director of the Division of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse, a Senior Editor of the Journal “Substance Abuse,” and co-editor of the American Psychiatric Association's “Textbook of Substance Abuse Treatment.” He has written four books, “Cults: Faith, Healing, and Coercion,” “Network Therapy for Alcohol and Drug Abuse,” “Spirituality and the Healthy Mind,” and "What is Alcoholics Anonymous?", and published over 200 peer-reviewed articles. His NIH and foundation-funded studies have addressed network therapy for substance abuse, pharmacologic treatment for addiction, the psychology of Twelve-Step recovery, and spirituality in healthcare.

    Dr. Galanter attended Albert Einstein College of Medicine where he did his residency in psychiatry. After that he was a Clinical Associate of the National Institute of Mental Health, then an NIH Career Teacher. He later served as President of the Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA, 1976-1977), the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry (AAAP, 1991-1992), and the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM, 1999-2001). Among his awards are the Gold Achievement Award for Innovation in Clinical Care, the Oskar Pfister Award for Spirituality, Religion and Psychiatry, and the Seymour Vestermark Award for Psychiatric Education, all from the American Psychiatric Association; the McGovern Award for Medical teaching from AMERSA; the Smithers Award for Research form ASAM; and New York State's Award for Psychiatric Research.

    MBBS, MPH, PhD

    MBBS, MPH, PhD

    H.E. Dr Hamad Al Ghafri MBBS, MPH, PhD  is the Director General and the Head of the WHO Collaborative Centre for substance use prevention and treatment of substance use disorders (National Rehabilitation Centre Abu Dhabi). He received his medical degree from the Faculty of Medicine, Jordan University of Science and Technology in 1999 and his Masters in Public Health from Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, USA in 2002. He obtained his PhD from the Faculty of Medicine, University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom in 2013. He is the Head of Higher Committee for Treatment, Rehabilitation and Social Re-integration and a Board Member of Anti Dugs Council in the UAE. He is also a member of the Advisory Board of the College of Medicine, United Arab Emirates University. Internationally, he is the Vice President of the Arab Federation for Drug Prevention. He is a Mental Health Advisor to the Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office (EMRO) of the WHO and Chair of the Technical Advisory Group (TAG) of UNODC and WHO. He is a Board member of the International Society for Addiction Medicine and a Board Member of the International Consortium of Universities for Drug Demand Reduction (ICUDDR).  He is also Emeritus Professor at the Faculty of Medicine, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan. From 2016 to 2018 was the Chair of the Commissioners of the Global Centre for Credentialing and Education of Addiction Professionals (GCCC) of the Colombo Plan.  His research interests include public health aspects and prevention of addiction, particularly in Arab countries. In recognition of his contribution to his field and the country, he was awarded the Sheik Rashed Award for Science and Culture in 2003 and 2014. In 2017, he was awarded the honor of Lifetime Membership of the American Society for Addiction Medicine.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of XX AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of XX LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of XX AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn XX Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • The Role of Telehealth and Telemedicine in Addiction Treatment (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about the benefits of telemedicine: video technology that improves access to specialized care from the 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    Telemedicine is increasingly popular as a method to deliver addiction treatment. Use of video technology allows improved access to specialized care, particularly for patients living in rural and underserved areas. Prescribing medication treatment for opioid use disorder through telemedicine is also enhancing our ability to address the opioid epidemic. However, this is an arena with rapidly changing regulation and reimbursement. During this session, we will examine factors that need to be considered when delivering telemedicine services for addiction treatment. The broader concept of telehealth encompasses a wide variety of other health related activities, such as web-based continuing professional education; electronic patient reminders, education, monitoring, and access to personal health information; and remote consultation between medical providers. The ECHO model is an increasingly popular approach that combines several features of telehealth in order to provide case-based telementoring, continuing professional education, and expansion of healthcare workforce capacity.  We will also examine in this session the rapid expansion of the use of ECHO to address the opioid epidemic and other addiction medicine arenas in the US and internationally.  




    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Understand how telemedicine works in treatment of SUDs, and the technology and infrastructure needed in order to treat patients via telemedicine.
    2.) Stay compliant with federal and state laws and regulations when utilizing these resources.
    3.) Understand how participation in addiction-focused ECHO programs can enhance clinical knowledge and decision-making and expand workforce capacity to address SUDs. 



    David Kan

    MD, DFASAM

    Dr. David Kan graduated from Northwestern University Medical School. He completed his general and forensic psychiatry training at the University of California, San Francisco. The majority of Dr. Kan's career has been spent in opioid treatment. Dr. Kan was the Medical Director of San Francisco VA Medical Center Opioid Treatment Program from 2005-2015 and he is the current Medical Director of Bright Heart Health. Dr. Kan is a faculty member within the UCSF Department of Psychiatry. Dr. Kan has won several awards for excellence in teaching. In addition to his psychiatry practice, Dr. Kan consults to attorneys and courts on medical-legal matters. Dr. Kan serves on California state's State Opioid Safety Workgroup. Dr. Kan is active within ASAM. Dr. Kan is the current President of the California Society of Addiction Medicine.

    Miriam Komaromy

    , MD, FACP,DFASAM

    Dr. Miriam Komaromy is a physician and professor of medicine at the University of New Mexico in the United States.  She is board certified in Internal Medicine and Addiction Medicine.  She has been an Associate Director in the ECHO Institute, leading ECHO programs that are focused on treatment of substance use disorders for the past 13 years.  She consults with programs around the world on implementation of the ECHO model to expand access to specialized medical care, and particularly focuses on ECHO for addictions, mental health, care of complex populations, and ECHO programs to support community health workers. Dr. Komaromy provides clinical consultation and outpatient care for patients with complex substance use disorders.  She has served as Medical Director for New Mexico’s addiction treatment hospital, and led the development of the state’s guidelines for treatment of opioid use disorder.  Dr. Komaromy is a member of the board of directors of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), which is the largest addiction-specialty society in the United States.  She is vice-chair of ASAM’s national medical education committee, and she chairs their Fundamentals of addiction medicine committee.  She was recently elected ASAM educator of the year for 2019.  Dr. Komaromy lectures nationally and internationally on addiction medicine topics, including treatment of opioid use disorder, harm reduction, and how to address the use of amphetamine-type substances.  Dr. Komaromy is currently serving as a Fulbright Scholar in Hanoi, Vietnam, performing research and providing education on treatment of substance use disorders.


    Aaron D. Greenblatt

    MD

    Dr. Greenblatt has been a faculty member at the University of Maryland School of Medicine since completing his fellowship in Addiction Medicine in 2015. He divides his clinical responsibilities between the Division of Addiction Research and Treatment (DART) in the Department of Psychiatry and the Department of Family and Community Medicine. He is medical director of the University of Maryland Drug Treatment Center (DTC), where he treats patients, coordinates clinical care, hosts research projects, and participates in the clinical education of medical students, psychiatry residents, and addiction fellows. He is currently working to further the integration of medical and mental health services in the DTC. Dr. Greenblatt also provides addiction treatment via telemedicine in rural Maryland, and has published and lectured on the topic. He fields consultation requests for MACS, a statewide warmline for clinical questions about addiction. He is working on addiction treatment in the SNF setting, and provides low-threshold buprenorphine treatment in a drop-in center focusing on harm reduction for sex workers. He is also the associate director of the Addiction Medicine Fellowship at UMMC. In the Department of Family and Community Medicine, he sees primary care patients in his own practice and precepts medical students and residents in their training. In addition, he is undertaking writing and curriculum development, especially in domains that relate to the intersection of primary care, care of chronic illness in patients with addiction, and enhanced treatment of substance use disorders.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Integrating Hepatitis C and Substance Use Disorder Treatment (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about models of integration for concurrent treatment of hepatitis C virus and SUD from the 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    This 90-minute workshop will use didactic instruction and small group discussion to provide models for integration of concurrent treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and substance use disorder (SUD). Globally, HCV is a leading cause of liver-related mortality. In the United States, HCV is the most common blood-borne pathogen and deaths from HCV exceed those associated with HIV infection. Injection drug use is the foremost risk factor for HCV acquisition in the United States and estimates of the prevalence of HCV infection among persons who inject drugs (PWID) ranges between 40 �" 80%, dependent upon the sample. With the advent of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) regimens for treatment of HCV infection, it is now a curable disease. Despite recommendations for treatment of HCV in PWID, regardless of their current drug use status, treatment initiation in this population remains low. Using the opioid epidemic as a framework for the discussion, the presenters will discuss their own experiences in integrating HCV and SUD treatment, within 3 different modalities: 1) integration of HCV treatment into an opioid treatment program 2) integration of office-based buprenorphine treatment (OBOT) into a HCV clinic and 3) integration of HCV treatment and OBOT into a primary care practice. The session will start with a brief overview of HCV epidemiology, screening and treatment, followed by description of the 3 different models of integration.  The group will then break into three/four smaller groups for facilitated discussion to allow participants to brainstorm how to best integrate HCV and SUD treatment in their own clinical settings. In each small group, a presenter will facilitate the dialogue ensuring discussion of key points for consideration. At the end of the session, the large group will reconvene. One participant from each small group will report on the content of their discussion providing an opportunity for cross-learning amongst workshop participants.  Presenters will provide a brief summary emphasizing the key concepts for the workshop and answer any outstanding questions on integration of HCV and SUD treatment. Proposed Timeline (in minutes): 0:00 �" 0:15 Introduction and Overview of HCV epidemiology, screening, and treatment 0:15 �" 1:00 Discussion of 3 HCV/SUD treatment integration models 1:00 �" 1:15 Small Group Case Discussions 1:15 �" 1:20 Large Group Discussion of Cases 1:20 �" 1:30 Questions and Answers/Session Evaluation



    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Discuss HCV epidemiology, screening and treatment particularly as it pertains to persons who inject drugs.
    2.) Describe at least 3 different models for integration of HCV and SUD treatment.
    3.) Identify ways to integrate HCV and SUD into their own clinical practice setting.



    Anika Alvanzo

    MD, MS, FASAM, FACP

    Anika Alvanzo, MD, MS is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine where she is also the Medical Director of the Johns Hopkins Hospital Substance Use Disorders Consultation Service (SUDS). Dr. Alvanzo is a graduate of the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences and holds a master's degree in biostatistics from Virginia Commonwealth University. She is board certified in both Internal Medicine and Addiction Medicine. As the Director of the SUDS, Dr. Alvanzo oversees a multidisciplinary consultation service that performs brief behavioral interventions and counseling for hospitalized patients, facilitates linkage to hospital and community-based alcohol and drug treatment programs, provides guidance on the clinical management of substance withdrawal syndromes, and educates patients, families, healthcare professionals and the community to prevent, identify, and treat persons living with addiction. Dr. Alvanzo is also the Director of the Substance Use Disorders Rotation for the Johns Hopkins Medicine-Pediatrics Urban Health and Urban Health Primary Care Residency track programs. Her research interests include gender and race/ethnicity differences in the risk for substance use disorders, integration of technology for screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment in diverse settings and the association between psychological trauma, traumatic stress, and substance use. In particular, she is interested in the mechanisms by which histories of physical and/or sexual violence confer increased risk for substance use disorders and in the development of interventions for co-occurring traumatic stress and substance misuse in women.

    Yngvild Olsen

    MD, MPH, DFASAM

    Medical Director at Institutes for Behavior Resources, Inc.

    Oluwaseun Falade-Nwulia

    MBBS, MPH

    Oluwaseun Falade-Nwulia, MBBS, MPH, is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.She focuses her clinical pursuits on care of HIV and HCV infected patients and educating clinicians and public health practitioners about STDs, HIV, and hepatitis. Her research focuses on understanding the distribution and impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy on hepatitis B and C outcomes, and on improving HIV and hepatitis C (HCV) testing and access to care in medically underserved communities.

    Megan Buresh

    MD

    Dr. Megan Buresh is an Assistant Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.  She is board certified in internal medicine and addiction medicine and certified as AAHIVM HIV Specialist.  She received a Bachelor of Arts in Biochemical Sciences from Harvard University (magna cum laude with highest honors in field), completed medical school at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.  She is the Secretary of the Maryland-DC ASAM Chapter. She is medical director of the Johns Hopkins Bayview Inpatient Addiction Consult Service.  She also provides integrated buprenorphine treatment as part of her outpatient primary care practice.  She is lead physician for BHLI PCARE, a mobile buprenorphine clinic for patients being released from Baltimore City Jail.  Her research interests include public health and addiction, developing and evaluating models to expand office-based opioid treatment, and improving linkages between clinical addiction treatment and community organizations.  She is a co-investigator with the ALIVE study at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, where she is studying risk factors for opiate overdose and access to naloxone among persons who inject drugs.    

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5  AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • The New Enforcement Environment: How to Keep Your License & Avoid Indictment (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning how to implement responsible office policies and procedures, as well as physician-patient opioid contracts, to promote compliance with laws and rules from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    The Department of Justice, through the formation of twelve “Opioid Fraud And Abuse Detection Units,” has declared “open season” on opioid prescribers under former Attorney General Sessions’ federal criminal enforcement initiative. Relying on FBI, DEA and HHS investigators, and with state medical board and attorney general staff, local U.S. Attorneys’ offices have largely focused on prescribers of Suboxone and other Medically-Assisted Treatments for opioid addiction in their new efforts to detect and prosecute prescribers. Law enforcement now has immediate access to controlled substance prescribing frequency through state-run, online Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs, which allows investigators to quickly target addiction treatment professionals. Many well-meaning physicians have inadvertently become collateral damage in America’s War on Drugs, and are sometimes swept up in criminal prosecution and administrative enforcement initiatives for records violations and for misinterpretation of prescribing regulations and treatment regimens. Arrest and conviction carry severe consequences, including significant monetary fines, loss of medical license, debarment from participation in federal health care benefit programs and private insurance panels, inability to obtain practice insurance coverage and even jail. This crash course teaches practical, “how to” advice for staying on the right side of the law, surviving a law enforcement investigation, and avoiding being targeted by one in the first place.  This course will also address the type of documents and controls physicians should institute within their practices and with their patients, to assure compliance and to address issues related to opioid prescribing, such as interaction with pharmaceutical reps, toxicology programs, prescribing to friends and family and oversight of prescribing and non-prescribing personnel.  It is team taught by a former prosecutor who defends health care providers in enforcement actions and prosecutions under state and federal controlled substance laws, and by a well-known health care lawyer who advises physicians on the day-to-day structuring of compliant pain-management practices.  Between them, they have advised Medication-Assisted Treatment providers, including a large Opioid Treatment (Methadone) Program and Buprenorphine prescribers, and many clinics and office-based practices, concerning the  laws and regulations related to opioids. Avoiding the DEA’s notice isn’t difficult, but it does require knowing the law and regulations for prescribing controlled substances in addiction treatment, and constant attention to operate within them. This 60-minute workshop will cover the essentials: what the law requires, and how to abide by it; what the DEA is looking for, and how to avoid investigation; what to do when the government agents come knocking at your clinic door; responsible office policies and procedures, as well as physician-patient opioid contracts, to promote compliance with laws and rules; and especially, what records to keep and how to keep them, so they are tools for your defense, and not for your prosecution.


    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Upon completion, participant will know the Drug Enforcement Administration and Health and Human Services (Medicare/Medicaid/private insurer anti-fraud) requirements for lawfully prescribing controlled substances.
    2.) Upon completion, participant will be able to understand 'red flag' indicators for diversion and unlawful medical practices, which could lead to loss of state medical license, DEA registration and specialty practice certification.
    3.) Upon completion, participant will recognize recent processes and practices which have led to practitioners losing their medical licenses and in some cases even facing federal and state indictment and conviction.


    Efrem M. Grail

    J.D

    Efrem M. Grail is a former criminal prosecutor and top-20 law firm partner who established his own firm in Pittsburgh five years ago to defend individuals and entities, most often in health care, facing charges and allegations in white collar criminal matters, administrative enforcement and civil regulatory proceedings, and in related litigation matters. Efrem also advises on legal and regulatory compliance for physicians and provider entities, and conducts internal investigations. He negotiated one for the first (2004-05) civil consent settlements on behalf of a provider with the Drug Enforcement Agency under the Drug Abuse Treatment Act (DATA 2000). He served as outside counsel for Mecication-Assisted Treatment providers including Buprenorphine prescribers and a major urban (Methadone) Opioid Treatment Program, and regularly appears in federal courts nationwide on behalf of accused practitioners, prescribers, clinic owners and pharmacists facing indictment and regulatory charges. He is a member of the Bars of the State of California and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and has been selected "Super Lawyer" in White Collar Criminal Defense. Mr. Grail publishes and speaks on compliance and avoiding criminal and regulatory investigation to physicians, medical providers, and medical and dental students. Efrem received his law degree from Columbia University, after graduating from Northwestern University.

    Ericka L. Adler

    Esq.

    Ms. Adler concentrates her practice in regulatory and transactional health care law. She represents individual providers, physician groups and other health care entities (i.e. home health care agencies, DME companies, hospices, MRI facilities and surgery centers) in satisfying their day-to-day legal health care needs. Ms. Adler has extensive experience in compliance counselling, structuring and implementing complex joint ventures to comply with state and federal laws and regulations, including Stark, Anti-Kickback Statute, fee-splitting concerns, the corporate practice of medicine and other restrictions on health care professionals. Ms. Adler devotes a large part of her practice to advising professionals and practices on their contracts and compensation arrangements, and in assisting her clients in the acquisition and sale of health care entities. She works with providers in matters relating to HIPAA, fraud and abuse, billing audits, government investigations, licensure matters and contract disputes. In addition, Ms. Adler is a former adjunct professor of law at DePaul University College of Law where she taught a class on healthcare fraud and abuse. She is also a contributing writer to the Law & Malpractice section of the online magazine Physicians Practice, where she addresses legal and management issues facing independent physician practices.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • How Physicians Can Help Implement Evidence Based Prevention in Addiction Medicine (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about ASAM's policy of prevention from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    Traditionally ASAM’s focus is on treatment but as in all health conditions, prevention is important. The Surgeon General and the United Nations have come out with reports on prevention within the last 2 years. This year ASAM has written a new policy on prevention that encourages CME on prevention, among other things.In this workshop there will be a brief review of the Surgeon General’s and the UN Report. It will allow those present to understand what is in the reports and how they can be used as a resource for identifying evidence-based prevention. The new ASAM policy on prevention will be presented. The main focus of the workshop is to help those present see how they can help implement this new policy in our communities and practices. Much evidence-based prevention is done based on the risk and protective factor framework and is done through families, religious, community organizations and schools. Some are not formal programs. More formal prevention is done by non-physician groups (schools, community coalitions, and grant sponsored prevention agencies). Some of the prevention activities are evidence based and some have been shown through studies not evidence based. The Surgeon general’s and US report provide extensive data on this. Other than briefly surveying this information, this workshop will highlight how physicians can be involved.This will be done through open discussion of examples (real and theoretical) of physician involvement. Examples will include physician involvement in community coalitions, in influencing school and community decision making, and physician leadership in helping to secure grants and through speaking and community education. Examples will be shared. How to approach communities that are using programs that have been shown not to work and substitute programs that are evidence based will be discussed, since this is an area where physicians can have an impact. A second way addiction specialists can be involved is through leadership of medical groups. Primary care practices that are set up as medical homes can provide information and education to youth and their parents. At risk teens, those with many risk factors and those who are starting to binge drink or use drugs, can be referred to assistance or for motivational conversation within the medical group. The addiction specialist, working with others, can provide leadership, help train staff or bring in those who can do that.  Many teens are at risk even though they may not be currently drinking or using drugs, such as teens whose siblings or parents use drugs. Although those present will be made aware of examples of evidence-based prevention they can be involved in, the goal is for them to identify ways that they might bring some of this to their community, medical groups with which they work, and to medical students and residents with whom they have contact.  



    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Those who attend will learn about evidence-based prevention and how to research this on the UN and Surgeon Generals reports.
    2.) Those who attend will learn what the risk protective framework is and will briefly rate their community and identify one area that they may be able to try to improve
    3.) Those present will try to identify one or more areas in their community where they can introduce  some evidence based prevention activity  or improve on what is being done


    Norman Wetterau

    MD, FASAM, FAAFP

    Dr. Wetterau is a practicing rural family physician whose practice is mainly addiction medicine. He is the Liaison from ASAM to AAFP, to the PCPCC, and co-chair of the STFM addiction interest group. He is immediate past president of NYSAM and co-chair of ASAM Chapters Council. He is also on the board of COPE (Coalition on Physician Education in Substance Abuse) and clinical assistant professor of family medicine at the University Rochester School of Medicine. In addition he teaches a annual course in behavioral health at Hope Africa Medical School in Burundi.

    Randolph Holmes

    MD, FASAM

    Medical Director at LACADA

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Severe Alcohol Withdrawal: Complexity and Controversy (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about treatment protocols for severe alcohol withdrawal from the 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    As addiction medicine is growing as a specialty and with the public due to the opioid epidemic.  Thus, addiction medicine specialists are increasingly likely to be called upon as experts to guide other providers in best practices for treatment of medical problems related to substance use disorders.  As 15.1 million adults had an alcohol use disorder based on 2016 NSDUH survey results and increasing rates of emergency department visits related to alcohol, it is important for addiction medicine providers to understand the management alcohol withdrawal. The risk of alcohol withdrawal in hospitalized patients has been reported as 8%, with a 20% incidence of severe withdrawal  in patients who develop alcohol withdrawal . Morbidity associated with alcohol withdrawal includes mechanical ventilation, increased length of stay in hospital and the ICU, and infection and though mortality from severe alcohol withdrawal syndrome has improved over the last 50 years up to 4% of hospitalized patients with severe alcohol withdrawal delirium die.  With this ongoing morbidity and mortality, there are still many questions left unanswered. Who will develop severe symptoms from alcohol withdrawal? Are benzodiazepines the best option for treatment of withdrawal?  What other therapies could be instituted to decrease the morbidity of severe withdrawal? In this workshop we describe how the pathophysiology and resultant clinical presentation of alcohol withdrawal informs the rationale behind the use of GABA and non-GABA medications and treatment protocols for severe withdrawal. The pharmacology of both GABA agents (benzodiazepines, barbiturates, and gabapentinoids) and non-GABA agents (general anesthetics, alpha 2 agonists, anticonvulsants, and NMDA antagonists) will be reviewed. The evidence base for the efficacy and safety of the various management strategies will be discussed, such as how to assess severity of alcohol withdrawal in the critically ill patient and the use benzodiazepine sparing regimens. Instruction will be through an interactive case-based format (4-5 cases) with expert faculty describing different approaches and highlighting key points throughout the case discussion. Examples of cases include a patient with alcohol withdrawal related delirium who has received 200 mg diazepam in the past 24 hours with discussion of the role for adjunct agents versus use of barbiturates; a patient with alcohol withdrawal who is mechanically ventilated and unable to extubate due to agitation when sedation is lowered, how can the severity of alcohol withdrawal be assessed and is there a role for use alpha 2 agonists?   



    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Describe the pathophysiology of severe alcohol withdrawal
    2.) Describe how alcohol withdrawal may present in the acute care (emergency department and hospital) setting
    3.) Explain the use and controversies of GABAergic and non-GABAergic agents for the treatment of severe alcohol withdrawal in the emergency department and hospital setting and the adjunctive agents available 



    JoAn Laes

    MD

    JoAn Laes, MD, Attending Physician, Division of Addiction Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN; Core Medical Toxicology Faculty, Minnesota Poison Control System, Minneapolis, MN; Medical Director, Mission Detox Center, Plymouth, MN and 1800 Detox, Minneapolis, MN, ASAM Medical Toxicology workgroup Chair.Dr. Laes' practice is focused on inpatient addiction medicine and toxicology consultation and outpatient treatment of opioid and other substance use disorders. She is board certified in Internal Medicine, Addiction Medicine, and Medical Toxicology. She completed internal medicine residency at Hennepin County Medical Center and medical toxicology fellowship at Regions Hospital in St. Paul, Minnesota.

    Timothy Wiegand

    , MD, FACMT, FAACT, DFASAM

    Timothy Wiegand, MD, FACMT, FAACT, DFASAM is the Director of Toxicology for the University of Rochester Medical Center and an Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine with secondary appointment in Public Health Sciences.  He holds Board Certification in Medical Toxicology and Addiction Medicine and has an active clinical practice through the Department of Emergency Medicine running the Toxicology Consult Service, which serves as the foundation for the toxicology/addiction rotation at URMC.  Dr Wiegand is also the Associate Fellowship Director for the URMC Combined Addiction Medicine Fellowship and he serves as Medical Director for Huther Doyle a Rochester, NY area outpatient addiction treatment program.  Dr. Wiegand is active professionally with a variety of professional organizations and he serves on the Board of Directors for the American College of Medical Toxicology, was recently elected to the American Society of Addiction Medicine Board of Directors as an At-Large Director (starts April, 2019) and is President Elect of the New York Society of Addiction Medicine.  Dr. Wiegand also serves on the Board of the Medical Toxicology Foundation which has as a priority to support research, innovation and education related to the interface of toxicology and addiction in particular related to the opioid and overdose epidemic.  Dr. Wiegand lectures on a variety of toxicology and addiction subjects at the national and international level and common subjects include the treatment of drug and alcohol withdrawal in paticular the use of buprenorphine to stabilize opioid withdrawal in the Emergency Department and hospital settings.  A significant component of his clinical, research and educational time and effort involves buprenorphine use including perioperative use and in acute pain management for patients maintained on buprenorphine for opioid dependence.

    Lewis S. Nelson

    MD

    Dr. Nelson is Professor and Chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine and Chief of the Division of Medical Toxicology at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in Newark, NJ. He is board certified in emergency medicine, medical toxicology, and addiction medicine. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the American Board of Emergency Medicine and the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education, and a Past-President of the American College of Medical Toxicology. He is an editor of the textbook Goldfrank’s Toxicologic Emergencies and on the editorial boards of several journals. He provides direct clinical care to patients in the ED and through the New Jersey Poison Information & Education System. His areas of specific expertise include the consequences of opioids, alternative (to opioid) pain management strategies, emerging substances of abuse, and medication safety.  

    Kurt Kleinschmidt

    MD

    Kurt C. Kleinschmidt, MD, FACMT, FASAM is a Professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas.  He is Chief of the Division of Medical Toxicology.  His areas of interest include Substance Use Disorders and snake envenomations. He graduated from the University of South Florida College of Medicine in 1986, completed his emergency medicine residency at Madigan Army Medical Center in 1990, and finished a clinical fellowship in Medical Toxicology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in 1999.  He is board certified in Emergency Medicine (1991), Medical Toxicology (2002), and Addiction Medicine (2015). He became the Medical Director of the Perinatal Intervention Program in Parkland Health and Hospital system in 2016. He served as the Toxicology Program Director from 2004-2018.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Ethical Dilemmas in Substance Use Disorders (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about ethical principles that can be applied to patient case discussions from 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    Ethical issues have become more prominent in caring for patients with addiction, with stigma contributing. Perceptions of substance use disorder as a patient choice continue to taint appropriate medical for patients with substance use disorders. Clinical dilemmas arise related to "difficult" patients, "manipulative" behavior, refusal of care (by patients and providers) and legal issues. The workshop will initially review the ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, justice, fidelity and futility, The understanding of these concepts will then be applied to patient case discussions.  Scenarios will include patients making perceived "poor choices", specialist refusal of care, "mandated" treatment, and organ transplantation in patients with substance use disorder. Participants will join small groups to discuss each patient scenario and develop an answer (there may not be just one right answer).  Participants will also have an opportunity to present their own patient dilemmas that pose ethical questions.  The session will help build clinical confidence, by building skill to make decisions in clinical situations using an ethical framework.




    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Upon completion, participants will be able to understand ethical principles in medical care
    2.) Upon completion, participants will be able to demonstrate the ability to make decisions using an ethical framework
    3.) Upon completion, participants will be able to educate colleagues on providing ethical care to patients with substance use disorder 



    Michael Fingerhood

    MD, FACP

    Dr. Michael Fingerhood is an Associate Professor of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University. He is the Chief of the Division of Chemical Dependence and medical director of the Comprehensive Care Practice (CCP) at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The CCP integrates substance abuse treatment with primary medical care, including care for HIV and hepatitis C.

    Megan Buresh

    MD

    Dr. Megan Buresh is an Assistant Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.  She is board certified in internal medicine and addiction medicine and certified as AAHIVM HIV Specialist.  She received a Bachelor of Arts in Biochemical Sciences from Harvard University (magna cum laude with highest honors in field), completed medical school at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.  She is the Secretary of the Maryland-DC ASAM Chapter. She is medical director of the Johns Hopkins Bayview Inpatient Addiction Consult Service.  She also provides integrated buprenorphine treatment as part of her outpatient primary care practice.  She is lead physician for BHLI PCARE, a mobile buprenorphine clinic for patients being released from Baltimore City Jail.  Her research interests include public health and addiction, developing and evaluating models to expand office-based opioid treatment, and improving linkages between clinical addiction treatment and community organizations.  She is a co-investigator with the ALIVE study at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, where she is studying risk factors for opiate overdose and access to naloxone among persons who inject drugs.    

    Jarratt D. Pytell

    MD

    Jarratt Pytell, M.D., is the 2018-19 fellow in Addiction Medicine at Johns Hopkins. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder in mathematics and psychology. Afterwards he was accepted into Teach For America and worked as a 7th and 8th grade math teacher at a public school located in New Orleans' Upper Ninth Ward. He then earned his medical degree from Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans. During medical school, he was accepted as an Applied Epidemiology Fellow at the Centers For Disease Prevention and worked for a year in the Division of Waterborne Diseases. He completed his medical residency at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. He will complete a General Internal Medicine fellowship at Johns Hopkins after completing his Addiction Medicine fellowship and plans to pursue a career in academic medicine focusing on the primary care treatment of substance use disorders and address health disparities in access to substance abuse treatment.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Medical Management of Patients that Use Cannabis (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about cannabis use and cannabis addiction in patients who present for the treatment of psychiatric conditions and addictive diseases from 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    A firm understanding of the association between cannabis use, addiction to cannabis and/or other substances, and psychiatric symptoms and conditions is critical to the modern practice of addiction medicine. The prevalence of cannabis use is expected to increase in light of ongoing regulatory changes permitting the legal sale and use of cannabis. Additionally, cannabis use is more frequently used by individuals with the diagnosis of addiction. There is a well-documented association between cannabis use and several psychiatric sequelae. Therefore, patients who come to the attention of addiction physicians are increasingly likely to use cannabis. This presentation is designed to prepare clinicians to provide addiction medical management in patients who also use cannabis. This presentation will be divided into three sections. First, the presenters will briefly review the literature related to cannabis use and several psychiatric conditions. The presenters will provide a sample patient handout that summarizes the relevant therapeutic and repercussive correlations of cannabis use, which is useful for patient psychoeducation. Second, the presenters will review the recent research findings related to the treatment of cannabis and other addictive disorders. Third, the presenters will facilitate an interactive discussion of four sample cases of patients who present for non-cannabis addiction treatment but disclose using cannabis regularly. Examples of these cases will include: 1) a 45-year-old who uses cannabis daily and seeks treatment for excessive prescription opioid use; 2) a 22-year-old college student who uses cannabis daily and seeks treatment for anxiety and impairing alcohol use; 3) a 45-year-old veteran who uses cannabis daily and seeks treatment for anger outbursts and alcohol addiction, 4) and a 17-year-old adolescent who uses cannabis regularly and brought by his parents for chronic irritability and stimulant abuse. During these cases, the presenters will review and demonstrate motivational interviewing techniques, including how to use of the brief negotiated interview when patients present with co-occurring cannabis use. The workshop will conclude with an open discussion of these cases and a period of question and answer by audience participants.  By the conclusion of the workshop, participants will have a stronger understanding of the importance of addressing cannabis use and cannabis addiction in patients who present for the treatment of psychiatric conditions and addictive diseases.  




    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Describe the association between cannabis use, addiction involving cannabis and other substances, and psychiatric symptoms and conditions.
    2.) Develop an addiction medicine and/or psychiatric treatment plan for patients that use cannabis who have a substance use disorder and/or other psychiatric condition.
    3.) Apply a motivational interviewing technique as part of a conversation related to changing cannabis use with patients.



    Iman Parhami

    MD, MPH

    Iman Parhami, MD, MPH is a double-board certified child and adolescent psychiatrist focused on addictions. Dr. Parhami currently sees adult patients at a LA County's community mental health clinic, where he is also the co-leader of the Co-Occurring Disorders Clinic. In addition, he is the psychiatrist for two residential treatment centers for adolescents with substance use problems and he sees patients at USC's University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities at Children's Hospital of Los Angeles. 

    Dr. Parhami completed his child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship at Johns Hopkins University and his adult psychiatry residency at Delaware's State program. During his training, he received multiple national recognition awards, which included a research training grant from the American Academy of Children and Adolescents and National Institute of Drug Use, and other awards from the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry and American Psychiatric Association. Dr. Parhami has published multiple peer-reviewed scientific journal articles focusing on addictive disorders. Notably, Dr. Parhami completed a postdoctoral research fellowship at UCLA focusing on psychosocial interventions for behavioral addictions and a clinical fellowship at the Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia.

    Marissa Andres-Kim

    MD

    Marissa Andres-Kim, MD, is a board certified psychiatrist, who completed her residency at the Harbor-UCLA Medical Center after graduating from the University of California Davis School of Medicine.  She works at a community mental health center for the Los Angeles County’s Department of Mental Health, where she treats patients for general psychiatric disorders, including substance use, in English, Spanish, and Tagalog.  With Dr. Iman Parhami, Dr. Andres-Kim established a Co-Occurring Disorders Sub-Clinic and Multi-Disciplinary Team that is focused on improving the delivery of addiction treatment in a community setting.  At her clinic, she is also the lead for the Dialectical Behavioral Therapy team that works with patients with Borderline Personality Disorder, including those with co-morbid substance use.  Outside of her clinic, Dr. Andres-Kim is a volunteer faculty member at the New Center for Psychoanalysis in Westwood and regularly teaches a seminar on Object Relations Theory.  Dr. Andres-Kim is focused on providing effective clinical care to patients as well as enhancing the strengths of those who work with her.  Outside of work, she also enjoys visiting national parks with her family, taking photos, and playing the accordion.

    Brian Hurley

    MD, MBA, DFASAM

    Dr. Brian Hurley is an addiction psychiatrist and Medical Director for Co-Occurring Disorder Services for the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health (LACDMH), supporting the identification and management of co-occurring substance use among patients with mental illness served by LACDMH. He is an assistant professor of Addiction Medicine at UCLA. 

    Brian serves as the Treasurer and is a Distinguished Fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. Brian joined ASAM in 2002 as a first year medical student, and has served on the ASAM Board of Directors in various capacities since 2003. Brian previously served as chair of ASAM’s Membership Committee and Physicians-in-Training Committee and is formerly ASAM’s alternate delegate to the American Medical Association. Brian additionally served on the EVP/CEO search committee in 2010 that led to Penny Mill’s selection as ASAM’s current EVP/CEO. He has additional served in various roles for the Massachusetts Society of Addiction Medicine, New York Society of Addiction Medicine, and California Society of Addiction Medicine.

    Brian completed the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and was previously a Veterans Administration National Quality Scholar at the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System. He completed residency training at the Massachusetts General Hospital and McLean Hospital, where he was Chief Resident in Addiction Psychiatry and addiction psychiatry fellowship training at Bellevue Hospital and the New York Veterans Administration. Brian is a graduate of the Keck School of Medicine and Marshall School of Business of the University of Southern California. He was a 2012 American College of Psychiatrists Laughlin fellow, a 2010-2013 American Psychiatric Association (APA) Public Psychiatry Fellow, and a 2015-2017 Group for Advancement of Psychiatry Fellow. Brian has previously served on the Board of Trustees of the APA.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • The Addiction Dungeon: Journey of Addicted Women Through Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about Maslow's hierarchy of needs and how it can be implemented with recovery from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    Addictive disorders carry the risk of severe functional decline, while abstinence is usually accompanied by improvement in functional status, and a more consistent ability to get needs met; however, substance users struggle with conceptualizing their journey and future planning. Some evidence suggests Maslow’s Hierarchy can be helpful for psychological health and belief in internal control. There is little research on its direct application to substance use and recovery. In this workshop, we present a narrative, case-linked journey of women with addiction: along the way, we will discuss conceptualization of sobriety and/or abstinence and relapses in terms of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. We will review the steps and goals of each stage of the hierarchy, which are physiological, safety, belonging/love, self-esteem, and self-actualization. We then introduce a concept coined by our patients in recovery: the addiction dungeon, which our users defined as the level below Maslow’s basic starting point. We will discuss the element of confinement and lack of choice or free will in situations such as imprisonment, involuntary commitment and other confined situations. Lack of free will eliminates the element of internal control, which we seek to help our patients attain. By removing internal control in confinement, those in recovery become blocked from self-actualization. In this workshop (sections below), we will introduce a modified Maslow’s Hierarchy, including the addiction dungeon, as a therapeutic tool to help patients set goals in recovery, and to better address the challenges associated with each level. 1. Maslow’s hierarchy: how does the path to self-actualization apply to women with addiction? 2. Narrative focus group results: presented by two student winners of the prestigious Albert Schweitzer fellowship, describing how women in rehab perceive their experiences with confinement. 3. Clinical applications of modified Maslow’s hierarchy: link to commonly used therapeutic modalities such as cognitive behavioral therapy and motivational interviewing.

    (1 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:


    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Understand basic requirements of passing through the stages of Maslow’s Hierarchy
    2.) Have a general understanding of how Maslow’s Hierarchy can be applied to addiction
    3.) Learn about the impact of lack of free will leading to a new stage prior to Stage 1 of the hierarchy


    Nancy C. Shenoi

    Medical Student

    Nancy Shenoi is a fourth-year medical student at Baylor College of Medicine pursuing a career in psychiatry. She is interested in academic medicine, addiction psychiatry, and women’s mental health. With support from the Albert Schweitzer Fellowship, Nancy and her medical student colleague Maria Espinosa led health literacy and mental health workshops for women with substance use disorders at a state-funded residential rehab facility in Houston, Texas.

    Kimberly Parks

    MD

    Kimberly Parks, MD is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine where she is both a general and addiction psychiatrist. She recently graduated from the Baylor College of Medicine Addiction Psychiatry Fellowship and previously completed her general psychiatry residency at University of Southern California/Los Angeles County + USC Medical Center. Currently, she works at Ben Taub General Hospital in both the Substance Abuse Treatment Clinic and the Psychiatric Emergency Department. She is also a new addition to the Baylor Psychiatry Clinic where she is offering substance use treatment. She is passionate about the treatment of substance use disorders, resident education and women’s mental health.

    Nidal Moukaddam

    MD

    Nidal Moukaddam, MD PhD, Associate Professor at Baylor College of Medicine, is involved in clinical addiction medicine, education and research. Dr. Moukaddam’s interests include three distinct areas i)Scalable Health: the application of technology to mental health ii) Sociability and social ambiance automated measurements and iii) Instant countertransference (iCT) . The bulk of her work as a clinician revolves around difficult patients, those who have trouble getting care in traditional settings. Dr. Moukaddam's research interest focus on how psychiatry can benefit from technological advances for detection, tracking, diagnosis and treatment of mental illness & addiction. Prior efforts have led to the co-creation of a fee-free, dynamic platform for academic collaboration, Healthsense, that is available for researchers wishing to engage in sensor-based measurements in their studies. i) Scalable health: the application of technology to mental health. This is an area of collaboration with Rice University, Electrical and Computer Engineering department, which has produced innovative, cutting edge research into the applicability of measuring mental states objectively using smartphone applications. ii) Sociability and social ambiance automated measurements: the quantity and quality of connection between individuals determines the feelings of well-being and loneliness. Our aim as a research team has been to find ways to accurately and objectively measure an individual’s interactions, and quantify their ambiance in ways that can be used for psychiatric treatment. iii) Instant countertransference (iCT): this is a concept developed to bridge the gap between the notion of bias in healthcare, and the traditional psychiatric concept of countertransference. Looking for a flexible, nuanced explanation for how subjective clinician feelings can impact medical decisions. It is the answer of many years of experience in multidisciplinary work with emergency medicine.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • The ASAM Pain & Addiction: Common Threads XX 2019 (8 CME)

    Contains 11 Product(s)

    Participants will learn clinical best practices and new research developments for treating patients with pain and addiction and how to begin to integrate these techniques into their own practices.

    OVERVIEW

    The ASAM Pain & Addiction: Common Threads Course is one of ASAM's longest running and most popular courses. This course is designed to develop learners' clinical skills and improve treatment of patients who fall somewhere in the gray area around pain and addiction. Participants will learn clinical best practices and new research developments affecting treatment and how to integrate these techniques into their own practices. This year's course will examine complex and challenging patient cases and identify next steps to treatment.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    Upon completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to:

    1. List 5 ways that trauma can impact a patient’s pain and/or addiction.
    2. Create a script for communicating with patients about challenging clinical issues such as buprenorphine cessation or opioid induced hyperalgesia.
    3. Evaluate current research on non-pharmacologic therapies for pain and identify which may be useful with their patients.
    4. Develop a peri-operative treatment plan for patients on agonist and antagonist medications that reflects the current research and coordinates care with other members of the team.
    5. Identify methods to address acute pain in a chronic pain patient and methods to transition back after an instance of acute pain.
    6. Explain indications, risks, and benefits for tapering or discontinuing buprenorphine.
    7. Analyze current research on cannabis use in patients with pain and communicate that information to patients.
    8. Describe the recent data, risks, benefits, and indications for using gabapentinoids while treating patients with pain.
    9. Explain the relationship between pain, sleep, and addiction. Identify effects that key drugs play on sleep and the risks that creates.

    This course is intended for those in the addiction medicine field who already have some experience with pain and addiction. Other healthcare providers and members of the care team interested in treating this patient population are also encouraged to attend.

    Upon completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to:

    1. List 5 ways that trauma can impact a patient’s pain and/or addiction.
    2. Create a script for communicating with patients about challenging clinical issues such as buprenorphine cessation or opioid induced hyperalgesia.
    3. Evaluate current research on non-pharmacologic therapies for pain and identify which may be useful with their patients.
    4. Develop a peri-operative treatment plan for patients on agonist and antagonist medications that reflects the current research and coordinates care with other members of the team.
    5. Identify methods to address acute pain in a chronic pain patient and methods to transition back after an instance of acute pain.
    6. Explain indications, risks, and benefits for tapering or discontinuing buprenorphine.
    7. Analyze current research on cannabis use in patients with pain and communicate that information to patients.
    8. Describe the recent data, risks, benefits, and indications for using gabapentinoids while treating patients with pain.
    9. Explain the relationship between pain, sleep, and addiction. Identify effects that key drugs play on sleep and the risks that creates.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 8 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 8 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.