Catalog Advanced Search

Search by Categories
Search in Packages
Search by Format
Search by Type
Search by Date Range
Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
Start
End
Search by Keyword
Sort By
  • Toxicovigilance of Novel Synthetic Substances using Social Media and Forum Data (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about trends related to Novel psychoactive substances (NPS) from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    Novel psychoactive substances (NPS) is defined in toxicological and addiction literature as the class of substances which have been either newly synthesized or involve pre- existing substances that are abused in novel ways. NPS have become increasingly abused in the United States in part due to their ease of access, availability on the internet, higher potency or longer duration of effect, and sometimes a loophole bypassing the laws of scheduled drugs. By 2015, over 700 such substances have been reported internationally. Of the subclasses, synthetic cathinones, synthetic cannabinoids and psychedelics/phenethylamines account for the largest portion of NPS reports. These drugs are often abused recreationally or as a means of “self-medicating” in order to moderate and/or potentiate the side effects of other drugs, or to treat symptoms such as anxiety and agitation. Because there is great variability in the effects, formulations, and potencies of these compounds, they have potential to cause significant morbidity and mortality. NPS are rapidly being developed and cleverly introduced into society in order to avoid legal implications. The literature detailing the effects and usages of these substances is scarce. As a result, providers rely on their prior experiences with “similar” medications in order to hypothesize how a NPS will effect someone. However, this has significant limitations. In order to respond to the rise of abuse and decrease complications, the medical community needs a better understanding of NPS. In an effort to better understand these substances and evaluate trends, our research group analyzed online forum discussions of users whom described personal experiences with a substance. We then performed a thematic analysis to characterize the study sample.  



    Learning Objectives: 

    1.) Better understand Novel Psychoactive Substances (NPS) by learning about their origin, prevalence, and legal controversies.  
    2.) Treat acute overdose, abuse, and complications of Novel Psychoactive Substances more comfortably.
    3.) Locate resources that will provide information about specific novel psychoactive substances in order to provide more comprehensive care for your patients.


    Vincent Ceretto

    DO, MS

    Vincent Ceretto DO, MA graduated Summa Cum Laude from SUNY University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY and received his Master’s Degree in Anatomical and Pathological Sciences in 2012. He attended Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine in Erie, Pennsylvania and graduated with his DO in 2016. Dr. Ceretto is currently completing Emergency Medicine Residency at the University of Rochester, Rochester, New York and will become a Fellow of Medical Toxicology at the University of Arizona, Banner Health, Phoenix, Arizona in July of 2019. Dr. Ceretto has special interests in Toxicology and Addiction Medicine. His research interests include understanding trends of the opioid crisis and toxicovigilance of novel psychoactive substances.

    Nels Grauman Neander

    DO, MASc

    Nels Grauman Neander DO, MASc attended McMaster University and graduated with a Master’s Degree in Chemical Engineering in 2012. He received his DO from Western Health Sciences University in Lebanon, Oregon in 2016. Dr. Grauman Neander is completing Emergency Medicine residency at the University of Rochester, Rochester, New York in June of 2019. He is a certified instructor of the ASAM Buprenorphine course and the FEMA Hospital Emergency Response for Mass Casualty Incidents Course. He is a certified Physician Builder and Analyst for Epic. Dr. Grauman Neander's research interests include Addiction Medicine, Toxicovigilance, Informatics and Disaster Medicine.

    Sonya Narla

    DO, MA

    Sonya Narla DO, MA is a current PGY-3 Family Medicine Resident at the University of Rochester. Dr. Narla attended Case Western Reserve University and graduated with a Bachelor's Degree in English and Master's Degree in Biomedical Ethics in 2011. She then went on to serve as Executive Director of a global health non-profit in West Africa. She recieved her DO from Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine in Erie, PA. She has special interests in global health, underserved health populations, academic family medicine, and optimizing primary care. She has published several articles in Family Doctor, a journal of NYS Academy of Family Physicians, including an article on the Choosing Wisely Guidelines on Controlled Medications in Common Clinical Scenarios. 

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Value-based Payment Models to Address the Opioid Overdose Crisis (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about effective payer/provider relationships that are crucial in selecting payment models that fit the needs of individual practice from The ASAM 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    Since 1999, there has been a growing epidemic across the United States of deaths due to opioid overdoses. Despite a substantial amount of literature documenting the clinical effectiveness of medication, in combination with medical and psychosocial supports, as an effective treatment for addiction involving opioid use, this treatment method is significantly underutilized due to several problems with the existing healthcare payment and financing infrastructure. Of the estimated 2.1 million people who need treatment for addiction involving opioid use, only a small fraction of this population ultimately receives specialty treatment. While there have been several efforts aimed at addressing this public health crisis, value-based payment methodologies have emerged as an innovative solution to these systematic barriers to quality treatment. This session will provide attendees with an explanation of how addiction treatment is currently financed, explore the many problems with current payment systems, and address the need for value-based payment strategies that have the potential to improve patient outcomes and reduce spending for opioid addiction by overcoming existing barriers. Panelists will discuss the barriers that limit the availability and widespread adoption of alternative payment models. They also will look at efforts by insurers and other stakeholders to overcome barriers and use value-based payment models to enhance quality care, and ultimately expand access to addiction treatment. This session will also offer insight into effective payer/provider relationships that are crucial in selecting payment models that fit the needs of individual practices, demonstrate fiscal responsibility, and ensure that patients continue to receive access to critical care.




    Shawn Ryan

    MD, MBA, FASAM

    Dr. Shawn Ryan originally trained as an emergency physician at the University of Cincinnati and simultaneously obtained his MBA while completing his residency. For over 10 years, Dr. Ryan has practiced in the Greater Cincinnati area, and for part of that period, he functioned as a hospital administrator.  During this time, he became acutely aware of the issue of heroin/opioid abuse in the region and for the past 7 years has been working tirelessly to make a difference in his community. Dr. Ryan serves on many regional, state, and national committees/workgroups focused on turning the tide of this epidemic.  He is the immediate-past president of the Ohio Society of Addiction Medicine and the current Chair of Payer Relations for ASAM.  Dr. Ryan is very excited to continue to work in the field of addiction medicine and to have the opportunity to substantially impact the treatment needs of patients with substance use disorder.

    Amanda Mauri

    MPH

    Amanda is a PhD student in the Health Management and Policy Department at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. Her research focuses on issues related to behavioral health policy domestically and abroad. Specifically, she combines political science and health services research methods to evaluate national and local policies related to insurance equity, opioid misuse, and behavioral health provider shortages. At Shatterproof, Amanda works on a variety of initiatives related to MAT payment practices.   Previously, Amanda worked as the Policy Advisor at the Kennedy Forum and Thomas Scattergood Behavioral Health Foundation. In this position, she analyzed legislative and regulatory actions related to behavioral health insurance coverage. She mainly focused on behavioral health parity implementation, providing technical assistance to health plans and regulatory agencies and assisting in the development of accreditation standards and auditing protocols.   Prior to starting this position, Amanda was the senior researcher on A Common Struggle by Patrick Kennedy and Stephen Fried. In this role, she researched the development of U.S. mental health policy from 1960s to today and co-authored a roadmap to improve the U.S. behavioral health system featured in the appendix. Amanda received both a Bachelor's Degree in Health and Society and a Master's Degree in Public Health from the University of Pennsylvania.

    Debra Nussbaum

    PhD, LCSW

    Debra Nussbaum, PhD, LCSW Sr. Director, Behavioral Product Optum/UHC Deb started with Optum in 2009 as Director of Clinical Operations.  In 2013 Deb moved into national role as a Sr. Director of Behavioral Health Product. Deb is a co-founder and clinical lead for Optum’s national substance use disorder (SUD) initiatives. Deb has successfully championed many projects within Optum designed to improve member access to evidence based services, the development of the nation’s largest MAT network and the 24/7 SUD helpline and live chat capabilities. Debra’s clinical background has been primarily in substance use services in progressive leadership roles managing and developing treatment programs aimed at improving outcomes in addiction treatment services. Deb has a PhD in organizational psychology and is an LCSW licensed in Florida and in New York.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Looking Beyond Addicted Patients: Families and Others as Consumers of Addiction Treatment (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about the Physician Health Programs (PHPs) and their standard for success in making treatment work from the 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    This workshop addresses a known but often ignored paradox in the field of addiction treatment: 94% of individuals with a substance use disorder do not think they have a problem and do not want treatment. At the same time illegal drug users in the US spend about $100 billion each year on drugs while they spend virtually nothing on the costs of treatment. All addiction treatment in the US �" both public and private �" costs about $34 billion each year. Not surprisingly, the initial “customer” of addiction treatment and other recovery-oriented services is often the family or other interested parties who have serious concerns about the drug use of an addicted person. The customer of treatment can also be an employer, a healthcare professional, a school-based professional or the criminal justice system, among other many others. The concern for the role of others in the fragile recovery process is underlined by the experiences of the nation’s state Physician Health Programs (PHPs) which set the standard for success in making treatment work and in making five-year recovery the expected outcome. The role of the PHP care management extends from intervention, through evaluation to treatment and then to sustained monitoring to identify relapses and to ensure prompt intervention, which are all crucial to this success. While complying with this comprehensive care management PHPs offer to addicted physicians safe haven from the consequences of their addictive behaviors which would otherwise be imposed by the state medical boards. When looking for similar leverage in the lives of addicted patients, the most obvious place to start is the family. Families often expect episodes of treatment to “fix” the addicted family member. The reality is far different: long-term recovery commonly requires long-term care management and active, continuous recovery support. For many addicted people that calls for family action that is rarely achieved by “detaching with love.” This workshop identifies the implications for public health efforts to reduce drug demand and to rescue addicted people from the escalating damage done by their continued drug use. Efforts to curb addiction must educate and empower families and other interested parties to skillfully navigate the system of addiction treatment and health care �" not only to get addicted people into the treatment they need but also to actively monitor their behavior after treatment to support and sustain long-term recovery. The nation’s state PHPs reliably produce sustained recovery long after formal treatment has ended. They offer useful lessons in the essential elements of this new paradigm of recovery for families.

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:



    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Identify opportunities for the initial “customers” of addiction treatment to assist patients treated for addiction to achieve and sustain long-term recovery.
    2.) Articulate the essential elements of the physician health programs.
    3.) Emphasize the importance of sustained monitoring by the family for any drug use and for continued active participation in recovery support for five years from the onset of treatment.  



    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Recovering Through the End: Managing Addiction in Hospice and Palliative Care (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about epidemiology of SUD among patients with serious illness, and describe existing models of care for individuals with serious illness, including palliative care and hospice from the 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    Individuals with opioid use disorder and other addictions have a high mortality rate, not only from causes directly related to their use, but also from heart disease, cancer, and COPD, among other illnesses.   Patients with addiction who develop advanced cancer and other serious diseases may be less able to participate in treatments for their addiction, and often develop pain that prompts opioid prescribing.  However, with medical advances, the “dying” phase has become longer. Patients with serious illness may live months and years longer than they might have 20 to 30 years ago.  The combination of unlimited opioid prescribing and decreased participation in addiction treatment as individuals get sicker often creates chaos among patients and families and distress for medical providers. This session, led by a physician who is board certified in both hospice and palliative medicine and addiction medicine, will review the epidemiology of substance use disorder among patients with serious illness, and describe existing models of care for individuals with serious illness, including palliative care and hospice.  Through clinical cases, we will discuss the rationale for continuing addiction treatment in patients with serious illness, and we will learn of models for collaborating with hospice and palliative medicine providers in the care of this population.   



    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Upon completion, participants will be able to describe the importance of addressing addiction in individuals with serious illness.  
    2.) Upon completion, participants will be able to describe services provided by hospice and palliative care in the United States.
    3.) Upon completion, participants will be able to collaborate with hospice and palliative medicine care providers in the care of individuals with addiction and serious illness.  



    Julie Childers

    MD

    Julie Childers, MD, is a board certified physician in hospice and palliative medicine and a medical educator at the University of Pittsburgh.      In 2010, while continuing to practice in inpatient palliative medicine, she founded an outpatient opioid use disorder clinic, where she continues to see patients one half day a week.    In 2018, she became board certified in Addiction Medicine through the American Board of Preventative Medicine. She is a member of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers and has developed MI curricula for medical students, residents, fellows, and practicing physicians.  She is regularly asked to speak nationally and locally to palliative care professionals on managing pain in patients with opioid use disorder and addiction.  Her research interests include the overlap between pain and addiction, particularly in individuals with serious illness who are receiving palliative care.    

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Anywhere, Anytime: Model for Universal Access to Opioid Medication Assisted Treatment (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about the process and unique challenges in connecting patients to care from different clinical settings from the 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    Opioid overdoses continue to climb. In 2016, 116 people died every day from opioid related overdose (NIDA, 2018). Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) improves morbidity and mortality in patients with opioid use disorder, but only 10% of patients with a substance use disorder are in treatment (SAMHSA, 2017). Patients face many difficulties accessing MAT including stigmatization, wait times, difficulty finding a doctor, continued withdrawal, and payment limitations. Critically, patients are typically unable to access treatment at the moment they seek to stop using. The decisions to pursue sobriety often comes at the most inopportune times: for example, in the middle of the night when heroin dealers are available but admission to treatment is not.  When they do encounter the healthcare system, most patients are left merely with a phone number to call. In order to facilitate access to treatment, Denver Health and Hospital Authority has developed a hub-and-spoke system leveraging a narcotic treatment program to facilitate access to MAT. To date in 2018, we have started 385 patients on MAT including from the emergency departments and psychiatric emergency service (n=181, 47%), jail and forensic settings (n=40, 10%), acute inpatient medicine (n=52, 14%),  and a social detoxification service (n=32, 8%).  Each referral source requires innovative clinical processes to identify patients with opioid use disorders, evaluate for MAT eligibility, and initiate treatment. In addition to being ideal for the patient, MAT-on-demand reduces the intake burden on outpatient services as well. With this model, Denver residents can access opioid MAT 24 hours a day�"there is no wrong door and no wrong time to access care. We present the development of this model in an integrated hospital and outpatient safety net system including clinical processes, staff training, and financing. A case-based presentation illustrates the process and unique challenges in connecting patients to care from different clinical settings. While the overall 30 day treatment retention is 48%, retention varies significantly by referral source, from 15% to 67% (p  


    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Describe challenges facing health systems and individual providers for delivering addiction treatment
    2.) Describe how a Hub and Spoke Model facilitates patient’s entry into medically assisted opioid treatment  and describe clinical dilemmas in the aggressive extension of MAT in highly acute medical and psychiatric care settings.
    3.) Understand aspects of program developing including cultivating partnership with substance abuse treatment programs 



    Dayan Dachel Colon Sanchez

    MD

    Dr. Dayan Colon Sanchez, is the Medical Director of the Methadone Clinic and Adult Substance Treatment Services at Denver Health and Hospital Authority, the safety-net hospital for Denver, CO. She went to medical school at Temple University and completed a general psychiatry residency and an addiction psychiatry fellowship at the University of Colorado. Dr. Colon Sanchez is passionate about improving access to Medication Assisted Treatment for patients with opioid use disorders. 

    Scott Simpson

    MD MPH

    Scott Simpson MD is Medical Director of Psychiatric Emergency Services at Denver Health Medical Center and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Dr. Simpson has published on the management of substance use disorders in the emergency setting and part of the Denver Health team that launced Colorado's first 24/7 buprenorphine induction program. Dr. Simpson is board certified in general psychiatry, addiction medicine, and consultation-liaison psychiatry.

    Hermione Hurley

    MD

    Dr Hurley is an Infectious Disease, Addiction Medicine physician at Denver Health and Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Colorado. Her interest in substance care began after observing poor health outcomes for justice involved individuals at Denver Health Correctional Care Medical Facility. Her subsequent decision to pursue fellowships in Infectious Disease and then Addiction Medicine was motivated by the high prevalence of infectious disease and substance use disorders among individuals who are recently released from jail or prison. Her current position at Denver Health is supported by both Psychiatry and Medicine departments to increase treatment for individuals irrespective of where they seek care, be it the ID or methadone clinic.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Cook County Medical Examiner/Clinical Data Linkage to Inform Overdose Prevention Strategy (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about overdose prevention strategy gathered from Cook County, IL clinical data from the 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    Background: Over 49,000 individuals in the U.S. died from opioid overdose in 2017 [1]. In Illinois half of all opioid fatalities occurred in Cook County in 2016 [2]. Buprenorphine and methadone have been shown to reduce mortality among individuals surviving an opioid overdose [3]. Naloxone is a safe and effective medicine for opioid overdose reversal [4]. Cook County Health (CCH) is a large safety-net healthcare system based in Chicago IL. It comprises a 464-bed tertiary-care hospital, an emergency department with over 120,000 visits annually, a network of 14 community health centers, Cermak Health Services (providing healthcare to detainees at Cook County Jail), the public health department for suburban Cook County, and a Medicaid Managed Care Community Network. CCH serves a vital role for many patients at highest risk of fatal illicit opioid overdoses. Recognizing increased health care utilization preceding overdoses [5], we characterized all CCH community- and corrections-based clinical encounters that preceded fatal opioid overdoses in 2017 to help inform novel prevention strategies. Methods: All 2017 cases of illicit opioid fatalities in the Cook County medical examiner’s database were merged with CCH electronic health records. For matching records of decedents we obtained encounter history and ICD10 diagnosis codes. We characterized decedents and their CCH clinical encounters within 12 months of their fatality. Separately for ED visits, hospitalizations, clinic encounters, and detentions in jail, we assessed time between encounter and death, whether or not opioid use disorder was identified as a contributory diagnosis, and co-morbid conditions. Results: Cook County Medical Examiner data revealed 1017 overdose deaths in 2017 attributed to heroin and/or fentanyl.  There were 663 overdose deaths attributed to fentanyl.  Sixty-nine percent (n = 706) of all decedents had a documented CCH encounter within 15 years of fatal overdose, and 18% (n=181) had a documented encounter within 12 months. Of these 181, 49% died within 100 days of their final encounter, and 25% within 30 days.  Among decedents with a CCH encounter within 12 months of death, 133 (73%) were associated with �-1 ICD10 diagnosis codes; 57% and 32% with substance use disorder and opioid use disorder, respectively.  The two most common diagnosis codes were hypertension and “encounter for issue of repeat prescription refill”.  Among diagnoses recognized in the ED, “encounter for issue of repeat prescription refill” accounted for 20% of encounters. Conclusions/Discussion: Our analysis highlights important questions for a healthcare system seeking to improve its approach to opioid overdose prevention.  Where are the missed opportunities for intervention?  Does screening effectively recognize patients with opioid use disorder and enable care teams to implement overdose prevention systematically? What revisions to current care processes would improve access to proven overdose prevention interventions?  How accessible are treatment and overdose prevention resources for patients at highest risk of overdose?  During this session, we will introduce system improvement efforts identified and supported by this research across the domains of screening, risk stratification, and transitions of care. Practical implications will be reviewed for application to other healthcare systems.  



    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Describe the key findings from clinical and medical examiner opioid overdose data integration in Cook County, IL and its application to other jurisdictions. 
    2.) Identify potential healthcare system improvements and process changes informed by the clinical/medical examiner overdose data integration.
    3.) Demonstrate understanding of the opportunity and limitations related to medical examiner overdose and clinical data integration. 



    James Raspanti

    DO

    James Raspanti, DO is a second year family medicine resident at Cook County Health in Chicago, IL.  On top of an interest in full-spectrum family medicine, he has focused on acquiring skills in substance use treatment to better meet the needs of his patients.  His research interests include understanding healthcare utilization by patients with substance use disorder, creating structure for resident participation in MAT, and integrated care teams.

    Juleigh Nowinski Konchak

    MD, MPH

    Juleigh Nowinski Konchak MD MPH is a physician leader for the medication-assisted treatment (MAT) Collaborative at Cook County Health.  Juleigh is also core faculty for the Preventive Medicine Residency Program at CCH.   Juleigh recently served as Medical and Community Health Lead for Addiction Services at Heartland Health Outreach, a healthcare for the homeless federally-qualified health center in Chicago.  She has a master in public health degree from Northwestern University, completed her preventive medicine and public health residency at CCH in conjunction with Northwestern University, and attended the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine.  Prior to her medical training, Juleigh held several public sector roles in policy and public health including Director of Health Systems Integration with the Chicago Department of Public Health,  Special Assistant to the Assistant Secretary for Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and Health Policy Legislative Assistant at the Office of then-U.S. Senator Barack Obama. 

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • MAT on the Front Lines: ED Buprenorphine Initiation at a Community Hospital (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about programs that initiate buprenorphine in emergency departments from the 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    Introduction: With the high prevalence of untreated opioid use disorder and increase in opioid-related overdoses nationwide, there is a need for innovative programming to increase access to medication-assisted treatment (MAT).  Interest is building in programs that initiate buprenorphine in the Emergency Department (ED) since a recent study demonstrated successful outcomes with this approach  (D’Onofrio, 2015).  We have successfully implemented a rapid-access buprenorphine initiation program in the Emergency Department of a small community hospital in a rural area of Maine.  In this session, we will describe our program, present results 18 months post-implementation, and discuss our successes, challenges and lessons learned. Methods: A multidisciplinary team came together from the ED and the hospital’s outpatient addiction program to create treatment algorithms for communication, screening and clinical care.  We established standing appointments for intake at the outpatient addiction program within 72 hours of ER presentation.  Clinical staff was educated and trained on issues related to buprenorphine management, addiction, and stigma.  We created a system to track patient retention in treatment. Results: Fewer patients accepted buprenorphine in the emergency department than were anticipated.  The program treated approximately 25 individuals in the first year, a small minority of those who qualified.  Those who received buprenorphine in the ED followed up for treatment at the outpatient addiction program the vast majority of the time, and were retained in treatment at rates comparable to the D’Onofrio study and the general treatment-seeking population.  Unexpected challenges and successes rose from our experience, which have led to valuable lessons learned. Conclusion: We expect interest to continue to grow in ED buprenorphine initiation programs.  Implementing such a program in a small, rural hospital is feasible and with outcomes similar to the experience in larger medical centers.  Our experience overall has been highly successful and rewarding, and others stand to benefit from our experiences as they develop programs of their own. 



    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Define the essential components of an effective ED buprenorphine initiation program.
    2.) List several potential benefits and challenges of such programs.
    3.) Describe how an effective ED buprenorphine initiation program could be implemented in the participant's healthcare system.



    Leah K. Bauer

    MD

    Leah Bauer, MD is a psychiatrist and Medical Director of the Addiction Resource Center at Mid Coast Hospital in Brunswick, Maine.  She is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Tufts University School of Medicine, and is board certified in Adult Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine.  Dr. Bauer graduated Alpha Omega Alpha from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and went on to residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital and McLean Hospital adult psychiatry program, where she served as administrative chief resident.  In her current role at Mid Coast Hospital, Dr. Bauer leads a team of physicians and behavioral health clinicians, overseeing a robust buprenorphine/naloxone program, intensive outpatient programs, and evaluation and management of co-occurring psychiatric disorders.  She works collaboratively across hospital departments in clinical and administrative capacities and has developed programs including naloxone distribution and integrated care for pregnant and post-partum women.  In October of 2017, her team launched the first Emergency Department buprenorphine initiation program in the state of Maine.  Dr. Bauer has presented on issues relating to innovative delivery of medication assisted treatment for opioid use disorder at local and national levels.  She consults with programs across Northern New England regarding Emergency Department buprenorphine initiation and rapid-access to outpatient treatment.  In addition to her work in addiction medicine, she works as a consulting psychiatrist for Bowdoin College, and enjoys a balanced life in Maine with her family.

    Timothy Fox

    MD

    Dr. Timothy Fox is the Director of Emergency Services, Linconhealth Chair of the EM Workgroup at MaineHealth


    Sydney Ford

    MPH

    Sydney is a third year medical student at Tufts University School of Medicine from Brunswick Maine. She received her Bachelor of Arts in International Relations from the University of St. Andrews in Scotland, and her Master of Public Health from Boston University. She returned to Maine to complete a post-baccalaureate at the University of Southern Maine before beginning medical school. She will graduate in 2020 and plans to do a Fellowship in Addiction Medicine following a residency in Ob-Gyn.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Abstract Award Presentations (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about buprenorphine clinics, AUD, quality of sleep during SUD treatment, hospital addiction medicine, smoking cessation outcomes in primary care from a variety of award winning sessions from the 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    The six award winning abstracts from the 2019 Annual Conference Call for Abstracts will be presented at this fast-paced session. These abstracts were the highest scoring abstracts in their respective categories. Presenters will discuss their original research and take questions from the audience. Awardees will receive their awards at the end of the session.  Award Winning Posters are as follows: Implementation of a Buprenorphine Clinic at an Internal Medicine Resident Teaching PCMH �" Seth A. Clark, MD, MPH; Award Winner: Fellow-in-Training DSM-5 Alcohol Use Disorder Severity and Sexual Orientation Discrimination: A National Study �" Sean Esteban McCabe, PhD, MSW;  Award Winner: Underserved Population Perceived Quality Of Sleep During Substance Use Disorder Treatment �" Eric Richardson, EdS; Award Winner: Young Investigator Implementation of a Hospital Addiction Medicine Consult Liaison Service �" Martha J. Wunsch MD, FAAP, DFASAM; Award Winner: Best Overall Association of Self-Reported Chronic Pain and Smoking Cessation Outcomes in Primary Care �" Andrew Thomas, MD, MPH Award Winner: Resident Indiana Court Employees' Attitudes towards Medication-Assisted Treatments for OUD �" Barbara Andraka-Christou, JD, PhD; Award Winner: Associated Professional





    Michael Fingerhood

    MD, FACP

    Dr. Michael Fingerhood is an Associate Professor of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University. He is the Chief of the Division of Chemical Dependence and medical director of the Comprehensive Care Practice (CCP) at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The CCP integrates substance abuse treatment with primary medical care, including care for HIV and hepatitis C.

    Barbara Andraka-Christou

    J.D., PhD

    Barbara (Basia) Andraka-Christou is an Assistant Professor at the University of Central Florida in the Department of Health Management and Informatics. She researches at the intersection of health policy, health services, and health informatics, specifically in the area of substance use disorder treatment. She has a J.D. and Ph.D. from Indiana University-Bloomington and is a licensed attorney in the state of Florida. To learn more about her research, please visit www.bandrakachristou.com. 

    Seth A. Clark

    MD, MPH

    Seth Clark MD, MPH - Addiction Medicine Fellow Brown University. Received combined MD/MPH from the University of Texas Medical Branch. Completed General Internal Medicine residency, clinician educator track, and a chief resident year at Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. Currently participating in Addiction Medicine Fellowship at Brown University. 

    Martha J. Wunsch

    MD, FAAP, DFASAM

    Martha J Wunsch, MD, FAAP , DFASAM is an addiction specialist with The Permanente Medical Group in Northern California. She is the Program Director for the Kaiser Addiction Medicine Fellowship and Medical Director of the San Leandro Hospital Addiction Medicine Consultation and Liaiason Service. Marty earned a medical degree at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland, completed a pediatric internship and residency at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (1983-1986), and practiced general pediatrics in the Indian Health Service in Arizona.

    Dr. Wunsch was the Hoff Addiction Medicine Fellow at Medical College of Virginia/Virginia Commonwealth University (2000-2002). She is a distinguished fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine and a founding co-editor of the Journal of Addiction Medicine. Dr. Wunsch is a founding director of the American Board of Addiction and the President Elect of The Addiction Medicine Foundation.

    Sean Esteban McCabe

    PhD, MSW

    Sean Esteban McCabe, Ph.D., M.S.W. Co-Director and Professor, University of Michigan Center for the Study of Drugs, Alcohol, Smoking and Health Dr. McCabe is an internationally recognized scholar in the areas of epidemiology of substance use disorders, prescription medication misuse, sexuality, adolescence, and web-based data collection.  He previously served as the Director of the University of Michigan Substance Abuse Research Center (UMSARC).  Prior to joining UMSARC, Dr. McCabe served as the Director of the Office of Student Conflict Resolution and Assistant to the Vice President for Student Affairs at the University of Michigan.  Dr. McCabe received his undergraduate education from Kenyon College and his graduate education from the University of Michigan.  He has clinical experience treating adolescents, young adults and adults with substance use disorders.  Dr. McCabe completed a National Institute on Drug Abuse postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Michigan.  He is the Co-Director of the Center for the Study of Drugs, Alcohol, Smoking and Health (DASH) in the School of Nursing at the University of Michigan. Dr. McCabe has served as a faculty mentor on four NIH-funded substance use research training programs and he mentors undergraduate and graduate students and postdoctoral fellows.  Dr. McCabe was the recipient of the University of Michigan Research Faculty Recognition Award and he has been the recipient of three NIH research awards.  He served as the Associate Editor of the Journal of Addictive Diseases and reviews manuscripts for 40 health, research methods, and addiction journals.  Dr. McCabe reviews grant applications for several organizations including the NIH, Department of Education, and William T. Grant Foundation.  He has served as principal investigator of twelve NIH-funded projects in the past twelve years, as well as a participating investigator on a number of NIH-funded projects and he has authored or co-authored over 170 peer-reviewed articles.

    Andrew Thomas

    MD MPH

    Dr. Andrew Thomas is a second year family medicine resident at Queen's University in Ontario, Canada. He completed medical school at the Howard University College of Medicine in 2017. He has had an interest in addiction medicine (and in particular smoking cessation) for a number of years. He will be transitioning to practice this year and plans to have a mixed practice with community family medicine and outpatient addiction medicine.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • A Special Evening with the Father and Son from Beautiful Boy (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about family support and dynamic factors that can make addiction treatment more effective from David and Nic Sheff from the 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    Family support and involvement are dynamic factors that can make addiction treatment more effective. This is your opportunity to hear first-hand from father and son, David and Nic Sheff. Learn more about their personal journey of addiction and recovery, which still provides hope to many across the country today. This special session will be moderated by Marc Fishman, MD, DFASAM, and will include poignant clips from the movie, followed by conversation, insights, and personal reflections from David and Nic. Registrants should plan to attend and are encouraged to bring family and guests to this session. Popcorn and refreshments will be provided





    David Sheff

    David Sheff is the author of the New York Times bestsellers Clean: Overcoming Addiction and Ending America’s Greatest Tragedy and Beautiful Boy: A Father’s Journey Through His Son’s Addiction, now a major motion picture. His newest book, High: Everything You Want to Know About Drugs, Alcohol, and Addiction, is for young adults. David was the recipient of the 2017 ASAM media award. He writes for several renowned publications, has interviewed numerous influential people, and has written award-winning documentaries. David graduated from the University of California, Berkeley. He lives with his family in Northern California.

    Marc Fishman

    MD, DFASAM

    Marc Fishman MD is a specialist in addiction psychiatry and addiction medicine. He is a member of the faculty of the Department of Psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He leads Maryland Treatment Centers, which offers programs for residential and outpatient treatment of drug-involved and dual-diagnosis adolescents and adults. He has written and lectured widely on a variety of topics including youth treatment, placement and treatment matching strategies, co-occurring disorders, and medication treatment for addiction. His research focus has been in treatment of opioid use disorders in youth. 

    Dr. Fishman served as a co-editor for the most recent editions of ASAM's Patient Placement Criteria, leading the adolescent section, and served as the chief editor for the ASAM PPC Supplement on Pharmacotherapies for Alcohol Use Disorders. He is the chair of the Adolescent Committee for ASAM. He is a Past President of the Maryland Society of Addiction Medicine, and also a current member of the Board.

    Nic Sheff

    Nic Sheff is a New York Times bestselling author of two books, Tweak: Growing Up on Methamphetamine, and We All Fall Down: Living with Addiction. In 2019, he co-authored a book with his father, High: Everything You Want to Know About Drugs, Alcohol, and Addiction. Nic's personal experiences with addiction has given him insights into this disease that create truly compelling stories.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

  • Integrating Specialty Pain and Addiction Care (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about didactic and cased-based learning techniques, and practical approaches to optimize roles of care from the 50th Annual Conference (2019).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2019 Annual Conference, you will learn:

    The specialties of pain medicine and addiction medicine are intertwined in many ways, including patient population, chronic disease concepts, psychiatric comorbidities and behavioral issues, opioid management challenges and opportunities, and importance of empathy required for good outcomes, to name a few. A multidisciplinary team approach is also typically most effective in both fields. Despite these similarities, many specialists in the field of addiction medicine may not feel adequately equipped to diagnose and manage chronic pain conditions for their patients with active or stable substance use disorders. Similarly, many pain specialists are not sufficiently trained or experienced in assessing and treating substance use disorders, which can lead to erosions in care and diminished access. In this workshop, Dr Rudolf, an addiction medicine and pain medicine-certified physician, and Dr Stanos, physiatrist and immediate past president of the American Academy of Pain Medicine, will discuss how they and their colleagues integrate addiction and pain medicine in their multidisciplinary pain management specialty setting in Seattle. Using both didactic presentation and case-based learning techniques, practical approaches for optimization of the roles of each specialist in the care of the patient will be considered.  



    Learning Objectives:

    1.) Engage in proactive collaboration with local colleagues in pain medicine and/or addiction medicine to facilitate better outcomes and treatment retention.
    2.) Describe current best practices in multidisciplinary pain management.
    3.) Conduct patient care with a greater level of confidence, skill, and empathy when managing co-occurring substance use and chronic pain disorders.



    Gregory Rudolf

    MD

    Dr. Rudolf is a physician board certified in addiction medicine, pain medicine, and medical acupuncture practicing at Swedish Pain Services in Seattle. The clinic integrates multidisciplinary pain care approaches in an effort to optimize patient functional outcomes and self-efficacy. He has also worked extensively in inpatient substance use disorder treatment settings and has published on the topic of withdrawal management. He is on the ASAM Pain and Addiction Course Planning Committee, the board of directors of the Washington Society of Addiction Medicine, and is a clinical assistant professor at University of Washington.

    Steven Stanos

    DO

    Steven P. Stanos, DO currently serves as Medical Director of Swedish Health System Pain Medicine and Services in Seattle, Washington and leads Swedish's comprehensive pain center, Swedish Pain Services. The center provides interventional pain management, medical management, addiction treatment, and comprehensive interdisciplinary pain services.  Prior to joining Swedish, he served as medical director of the Center for Pain Management at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago (RIC) from 2002-2014. At RIC he was an Assistant Professor at Northwestern University Medical School Feinberg School of Medicine and co-chair of the multidisciplinary pain fellowship.   He is board certified in physical medicine and rehabilitation and pain medicine by the American Board of Pain Medicine and by the American Board of Anesthesia.   Dr. Stanos is the Immediate Past President of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. Dr Stanos served as a panel member on the Service Delivery and Reimbursement work group for the National Pain Strategy and as invited consultant for the CDC Opioid Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain. He currently serves on the American Medical Association (AMA) Opioid Task Force.   Dr. Stanos’ work includes ongoing educational initiatives for primary care, pain medicine, and physical medicine specialists around the United States and abroad. Dr. Stanos has published numerous scientific articles and book chapters related to pain management. Steven has been involved in the development and publication of treatment guidelines related to rehabilitation approaches for chronic pain and low back pain conditions and serves on the editorial board for the journal Pain Medicine.  A Mayday Foundation Advocacy fellow in 2013, his advocacy continues to focus on increasing awareness and access for interdisciplinary biopsychosocially-based pain care for patients suffering with chronic pain. He has appeared on CNN, National Public Radio, Fox News, regional print and television news on topics related to pain medicine and rehabilitation.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.