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  • Management of Pregnant/Parenting Women With Opioid Use Disorder and Their Infants (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about Clinical Guidance for Treating Pregnant and Parenting Women With Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) and Their Infants, a clinical guide, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn about the publication Clinical Guidance for Treating Pregnant and Parenting Women With Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) and Their Infants – a comprehensive Clinical Guide on managing optimal OUD care and treatment developed by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). This Clinical Guide meets an urgent need among healthcare professionals who treat women with OUD and children exposed to substances by providing reliable information that can be applied in clinical practices to achieve positive outcomes for both mother and infant. It contains an introduction to the guide and fact sheets that include clinical scenarios, clinical action steps, supporting evidence, clinical considerations, and web resources. 

    The factsheets are organized into three sections: 

    • Section I – Prenatal Care (Factsheets #1–8)
    • Section II – Infant Care (Factsheets #9–13) 
    • Section III – Maternal Postnatal Care (Factsheets #14–16) 

    The Clinical Guide is based on the recommendations published in Advancing the Care of Pregnant and Parenting Women With Opioid Use Disorder and Their Infants: A Foundation for Clinical Guidance

    This workshop will be moderated by Melinda Campopiano, MD, Medical Officer for SAMHSA’s Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. She and three members from the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method (RAM) expert panel will discuss treatment recommendations from the Clinical Guide. Audience members will have the opportunity to ask questions about the recommendations and the clinical care for pregnant and parenting women with OUD.

    Charles W. Schauberger

    MD, MS, CPE

    Dr. Charles Schauberger is an obstetrician who practices at Gundersen Health System in La Crosse, Wisconsin. He attended University of Iowa Medical School and completed a residency in Obstetrics & Gynecology at the same location many years ago. He received a MS in Administrative Medicine from the University of Wisconsin- Madison. He has published over 40 articles in the peer review literature. He is passionate about the care of pregnant women with addictions.

    Hendree Jones

    PhD

    Hendree Jones, PhD is a Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and Executive Director of Horizons, a comprehensive drug treatment program for pregnant and parenting women and their drug-exposed children. She is also an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Psychology, UNC, Chapel Hill and an Adjunct Professor in the Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University. 

    Dr. Jones is an internationally recognized expert in the development and examination of both behavioral and pharmacologic treatments for pregnant women and their children in risky life situations. Dr. Jones has received continuous funding from the United States National Institutes of Health since 1994 and has published over 185 publications, two books on treating substance use disorders (one for pregnant and parenting women and the other for a more general population of patients), numerous book and textbook chapters. She is a consultant for SAMHSA, the United Nations and the World Health Organization. 

    Dr. Jones leads or is involved in projects in Afghanistan, the South America, the Republic of Georgia, South Africa, and the United States which are focused on improving the lives of children, women and families.

    Diana Coffa

    MD

    Dr. Coffa is the Residency Program Director for the Family and Community Medicine Residency program at the University of California, San Francisco. in addition to practicing full spectrum primary care, Dr. Coffa co-leads an addiction consultation clinic and directs the chronic pain programs at the Family Health Center, an FQHC teaching clinic. She oversees the clinic's buprenorphine program and ensures that residents in family medicine, internal medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics, and psychiatry have access to buprenorphine training. She is also the primary consultant for buprenorphine prescribing at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, providing clinical guidance to hospital and maternal care providers who are treating hospitlalized patients for opioid use disorder.

    Anthony Campbell

    RPH, DO, CDR, USPHS

    Dr. Anthony Campbell is currently a board eligible candidate in the field of addiction medicine who currently services as a Clinical Specialty Consultant with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment in the Division of Pharmacologic Therapies (SAMHSA/CSAT/DPT). He and serves as a Commander in the United States Public Health Service. In his role at SAMHSA, he is responsible for planning, directing and evaluating the development of pharmacotherapy-based treatment standards and guidelines that require specialized DPT medical review. In addition he is an adjunct professor at both Howard University Colleges of Pharmacy and Medicine in Washington DC.

    Dr. Campbell earned two bachelor’s degrees from Howard University; Chemistry (85) and Pharmacy (88). He earned his Doctorate of Osteopathic Medicine from Ohio University (94). Additional training followed including a residency in Internal Medicine, with current board certification.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Harm Reduction for Patients Prescribed Buprenorphine: Is it Possible? (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning harm reduction strategies and keeping people engaged in care, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn that the hallmark of addiction is loss of control and ongoing compulsive substance use despite negative consequences, and is underscored by significant difficulty in executive functioning and organization. As such, especially early on in care or at a time of relapse, highly structured treatment modalities and scheduling are unrealistic for many at best, and potentially lethal for others at worst. If late or missed appointments result in longer waits or missed opportunities for care, or substance use results in discharge from care or referral to a higher level of care when the patient is either not able or ready to make such a change, the result can be no level of care. Despite the prescription drug monitoring program, misuse deterrent opioid formulations, expanded education efforts for safe pain prescribing and SUD screening and management, increased buprenorphine trainings and expanded waivers, the substance use disorder treatment gap remains and the opioid overdose epidemic continues to soar. The landscape of the opioid epidemic has changed even more dramatically with fentanyl and carfentanyl, requiring more readily available care, and flexible care models to help keep people engaged in care, while we work with them through the natural history of substance use disorder. By partnering with them in this manner, we help keep patients alive, lower their risk of ongoing serious health complications or overdose, and increase their chances of continuing to engage in meaningful treatment; we collaborate with them in the practice of harm reduction.

    Laura Kehoe

    MD, MPH, FASAM

    Laura Kehoe, MD, MPH, FASAM, is a medical director at the Bridge Clinic, Substance Use Disorder Initiative, for the Massachusetts General Hospital.  Dr. Kehoe is also Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and is board certified in both Internal Medicine and Addiction Medicine. She attended Tufts University School of Medicine and Boston University School of Public Health and completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital. At Massachusetts General Hospital, she is the Medical Director of the Substance Use Disorder Bridge Clinic, an innovative, “on demand,” urgent care addiction program, and an attending physician on the inpatient Addiction Consult Team (ACT). In addition, she is the co-chair of the hospital-wide Substance Use Disorder Education Committee, where she works with other team members to expand evidence-based treatment of patients with addiction, and is actively involved in resident physician training.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Teaching Substance Use Disorders to Millennial Learners (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about educational best practices for creating and implementing new SUD-focused curriculum for millennial learners, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn that the question of how to craft curricula to engage residents on Substance Use Disorders topics is both difficult and urgent.  It is difficult because there is a paucity of research on the efficacy of various didactic formats to guide us towards solutions; urgent because we are increasingly identifying knowledge gaps among residents in critical SUDs topics. Using as a model the new Substance Use Disorders Theme Block from the MGH Internal Medicine residency, this workshop seeks to spark discussion among educators about best practices for the creation and implementation of new SUDs-focused curricula for millennial learners. Through group discussions, video review of sessions, and microskills teaching, facilitators will explore how educators can expand the diversity of didactic formats, integrate Buprenorphine waiver training, and include peer-developed and peer-delivered content in their SUDs curricula. Throughout the session, participants will be exposed to different ways of gathering real-time and actionable feedback from residents. 

    The workshop begins with a brief interactive review of literature on the impact of different didactic formats on medical student and resident engagement and confidence, and explores the different didactic formats used in the MGH SUDs Theme Block--rapid-fire cases, simulation, skills workshops, peer mini-lectures. This is followed by small group discussions, with the goal of identifying barriers and benefits to implementing similar formats at one's home institution. After observing video of a peer-delivered session, a larger group discussion will address the three domains of resident/learner engagement--content creation, collaborative learning, and peer coaching—with associated examples of innovations in the MGH model to address these domains. Facilitators will unpack how Buprenorphine waiver training was delivered to all categorical and primary care residents in the MGH SUDs Theme Block. Finally, teaching micro skills that were highlighted by resident feedback will be reviewed in small group sessions.

    Devin Oller

    MD

    Devin Oller, MD is a graduate of Temple University School of Medicine, where he received the Thomas M Durant Prize in Internal Medicine. He completed his internal medicine residency at Massachusetts General Hospital, and was one of the inaugural fellows in Rural Health Leadership prior to returning to MGH as the Primary Care Chief Resident. He attends on MGH's inpatient Addictions Consult Team and the Bridge Clinic, a low-threshold model for delivering care to people who use drugs.

    Michael Bierer

    MD, MPH

    Michael F. Bierer MD MPH has been at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) for 30+ years. He holds the ranks of Physician there and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He completed his MD at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx NY in 1985 and his MPH at Harvard School of Public Health in Boston MA in 1989. He completed his Internal Medicine Residency at MGH in 1988 and participated in the Addiction Medicine Fellowship in the Department of Psychiatry at Boston University Medical Center in 2001. He ran the component of Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program based at MGH from 1989-2001, has been providing integrated care for addictions in a hospital-based primary care practice since 2002, and has been a leader in the education of medical housestaff at MGH about drug and alcohol problems. He is part of the new Substance Use Disorders Iinitiative at the hospital. He is former Secretary of MASAM and serves currently as President. He is one of the podcast voices for the New England Journal of Medicine.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Opioid Use Disorders and the Americans with Disabilities Act: Eliminating Discriminatory Barriers to Treatment and Recovery (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning how to eliminate discriminatory barriers in treatment and recovery for patients with disabilities and opioid use disorders, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018). This session was made available free of charge by ASAM until 11/16/18.

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn from an attorney from the Disability Rights Section in the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division will present on “Opioid Use Disorders and the Americans with Disabilities Act: Eliminating Discriminatory Barriers to Treatment and Recovery.” Among the topics discussed will be the Civil Rights Division’s response to the opioid epidemic; an Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) overview; the ADA’s application to and protections for people with substance use disorders and opioid use disorders; and how to file a complaint about disability discrimination with the Department.

    Elizabeth Westfall

    JD

    Elizabeth Westfall, Deputy Chief, Disability Rights Section, Civil Rights Division, U.S. Department of Justice

    Elizabeth Westfall is a deputy chief of the Disability Rights Section in the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice.  Ms. Westfall leads the Section’s initiative under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to combat discrimination against people with opioid use disorder who are in treatment or recovery.  She also leads the Section’s enforcement of the ADA’s integration mandate.  

    From 2010 until 2015, Ms. Westfall served as a trial attorney in the Civil Rights Division’s Voting Section, where she litigated cases under the Voting Rights Act.  Prior to the Voting Section, Ms. Westfall held positions with non-profit civil rights organizations and a civil rights law firm in Washington, DC, where she litigated voting rights, fair housing, and employment discrimination cases.  Ms. Westfall is a graduate of Harvard Law School and Carleton College.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Addiction & MH Conditions in Healthcare Providers: Eval, Tx & Legal Considerations (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about physician burnout and suicide rates, as well as treatment options for physicians with substance use disorder, from this recording at The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn that physician burnout and suicide rates are at their highest levels and steadily climbing. Workload, electronic medical records, decreased time with patients and poor work-life balance have all be proposed as possible contributors to the epidemic of physician burnout. In contrast, physicians have the same rates of mental illness (such as depression and anxiety) and substance abuse as the general population. However, the substance physicians tend to abuse are alcohol and prescription medications (v.s. illicit substances for the general pop). With all of these factors colliding into "Physician Health," it is no surprise that physician well-being committees are commonly tasked with assessing a "troubled physician".  Burnout and suicide are not limited to seasoned members of the field of medicine. Medical students and residents have burnout levels as high as 50%. We are just now starting to uncover the epidemic of medical student and resident suicide rates.  An intensive diagnostic evaluation of a physician is a repetitively new concept. Prior to the 1990's Physicians were confronted and in many cases forced into treatment. Currently, the practice is to encourage a physician suspected of having a substance abuse, mental health or behavioral problem into a minimum 72 hour diagnostic evaluation to uncover whether or not they need treatment.  Physicians face similar barriers to treatment as the general population such as shame. However, they also face barriers such as fear of losing their careers, losing medical malpractice coverage, losing credentialing/hospital privileges and more if they are diagnosed with mental illness or substance abuse.  Therefore, the delivery and quality of a diagnostic evaluation and treatment and monitoring for a physician are critical. Our workshop will cover the current healthcare environment and the epidemiological and other risk factors that physicians face. We will discuss the process of intervention and what to do when a colleague, staff member or resident/medical student is suspected of being impaired. In great detail we will cover the process of evaluating a physician from a multi-disciplinary approach. We will discuss the treatment process of when a healthcare provider (a colleague, staff member or resident/medical student) needs treatment including the intensity of treatment, levels of care, medication vs. non-medication treatment options, time needed off of work and other important considerations. Finally, in great detail we will cover the process of ongoing monitoring to assure the healthcare provider is safe to return and to continue to practice after receiving treatment. We will provide an interactive experience for the audience to help them incorporate a better understanding of both physician health and thorough treatment into their practice or into the medical institution. Legal consideration and concerns will be discussed and best practices will be provided.

    Matthew Goldenberg

    DO

    Matthew Goldenberg D.O. is an expert in the evaluation and treatment of mental health disorders and is an addiction specialist in Santa Monica, CA. He is double Board Certified in Psychiatry and Addiction Psychiatry. Dr. Goldenberg is the Associate Medical Director of Professional Health Services at Promises Treatment Centers. Dr. Goldenberg specializes in helping professionals (many of whom are healthcare providers) obtain and learn to maintain long-term recovery from drugs, alcohol and/or mental illness. In this capacity, Dr. Goldenberg assists in multi-disciplinary evaluations to help uncover if there is an underlying addiction or mental health condition and also provides treatment which includes individual medication and non-medication treatment options and group therapy facilitation. Dr. Goldenberg continues to engage in research and medical education as a member of the Medical Staff and as an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Cedars Sinai Medical Center, in Los Angeles, California. Dr. Goldenberg also maintains a small private practice in Santa Monica, CA. This affords the ability to provide highly individualized and evidence-based treatment to a select group of motivated patients.  Dr. Goldenberg completed an Addiction Psychiatry Fellowship through UCLA and Psychiatry Residency at Banner University Medical Center, of the University of Arizona, in Phoenix, Arizona. Dr. Goldenberg completed medical school at Midwestern University, Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine. Dr. Goldenberg matriculated at Santa Clara University for his undergraduate education. 

    Karen Miotto

    MD

    Dr. Karen Miotto is a Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at UCLA, the Director of the UCLA Addiction Medicine Service, and Chair of the UCLA Medical Staff Health Program. Dr. Miotto is the Chair of California Public Protection & Physician Health (CPPPH) and is the Chair of the Committee on Wellbeing of Physicians of the California Society of Addiction Medicine (CSAM). She is dedicated to promoting physician wellness and educating others on how to reduce physician distress, burnout, substance misuse and mental illness in the medical profession. Additionally, Dr. Miotto is frequently an invited speaker at local and international addiction medicine meetings. She is the recipient of a career development award from the National Institute on Drug Abuse and is an investigator in the area of addiction pharmacology.

    Greg Skipper

    MD, DFASAM

    Dr. Skipper is a Distinguished Fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine and a certified Medical Review Officer. He is currently the director of Professional Health Services at Promises Professionals Treatment Program in Santa Monica CA. This treatment program is a separate Promises program that focuses on evaluation and treatment of professionals. Dr. Skipper has conducted over 2,000 in-depth evaluations on licensed professionals over the past 30 years. Dr. Skipper previously served as Medical Director of the Alabama Physician Health Program (1999-2011) and was on the council that created and oversaw the Oregon Health Professionals Program (1989-1993). Dr. Skipper was also the primary innovator of ethylglucuronide, EtG, testing, a superior drug test for detecting abstience from alcohol use, in the United States and abroad and is an expert in alcohol biomarkers and other drug testing. He was a principle investigator of The Blueprint Study, the most extensive National Study of Physician Health Programs, funded by a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation grant, and is the author of more than 100 articles and book chapters regarding drug testing, physician health and contingency monitoring. Dr. Skipper was formerly Medical Director of Springbrook Hazelden and he was a chief advisor to the designing of the professionals program at Betty Ford Center and Bradford Health Services. Dr. Skipper assisted in developing Physician Health Programs in Melbourne Australia and Salzburg Austria. Dr. Skipper is also Medical Director of an educational company, Professional Boundaries, Inc., that conducts over 80 courses per year nationally in major cities regarding Professional Boundaries, Medical Ethics, Apprpriate Prescribing and Medical Records. 

    Kevin D. Cauley

    JD

    Kevin D. Cauley is the founder of Kevin Cauley, P.C., located in Los Angeles, California. He represents physicians and other health care professionals who are facing disciplinary action with respect to their professional licenses.  Mr. Cauley's practice focuses on professional licensing, medical staff peer review, Medicare and Medi-Cal fraud and recoupment, health care contracting, and the defense of white collar offenses. He has worked in the field of professional licensure and health care law for over a decade.  

    Originally from Atlanta, Georgia, Mr. Cauley graduated magna cum laude from Oglethorpe University.  Prior to attending law school, he worked for several years as a paralegal with a well-known law firm focusing on the defense of health care and other licensed professionals. Having developed a strong interest in this field, he then attended Southwestern University School of Law and was awarded his Juris Doctor. While in law school, Mr. Cauley served as a managing editor of the Los Angeles Public Interest Law Journal, completed a public interest fellowship program at the Los Angeles Gay & Lesbian Center and was honored for his scholastic achievements with the Witkin Award for Academic Excellence. 
    Mr. Cauley is a member of the American Psychology-Law Society, California Academy of Attorneys for Healh Care Professionals, California Attorneys for Criminal Justice, and The American Association of Nurse Attorneys. 

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Addressing Complex Issues in Buprenorphine Prescribing: a Workshop (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about the intricacies of prescribing buprenorphine, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn that buprenorphine became available for the treatment of opioid dependence in the United States in 2002. The accompanying regulations also allowed that the treatment be done outside of Opioid Treatment Programs (OTPs) or methadone clinics in a variety of settings including office-based providers and various types of outpatient programs by physicians (and now advanced providers) who obtain X-waiver certification. While it is clear that buprenorphine is an effective treatment for patients with opioid dependence with retention in treatment, reduction in illicit opiate use, decreases in craving and improvements in function on a variety of levels supported as evidence-based outcomes various issues come up in prescribing patients buprenorphine. Some physicians ignore the problems and others have zero tolerance for any deviations from what is expected. In this workshop two physicians with many years’ experience from outpatient treatment programs, Emergency Departments, detoxification units and hospital settings as well as primary care practice, will present and moderate case-based discussions in addressing complex issues in buprenorphine prescribing. These issues include running out of medication early or encounters with patients who report lost or stolen medications. What does one do when the urine has been adulterated or substituted or does not show any buprenorphine? How should one optimally approach patients that are using other substances such as alcohol, cocaine, marijuana or prescription sedatives and benzodiazepines when prescribed buprenorphine? These issues are discussed and often debated yet typically don’t come to easy resolution. The authors of this workshop will present and moderate discussion for various cases and provide examples of and support for approaches for challenging patient encounters that providers prescribing buprenorphine are confronted with. The format is through moderated case discussion and the audience will be encouraged to present their thoughts and responses for discussion during this session as well. Where available references to support decision making and to clarify pharmacologic, toxicologic and forensic principles, such as interpretation of drug testing results, will be provided. Cases will also serve to reinforce basic addition medicine competencies in these areas though interactive discussion and presentation rather than didactic lecture.

    Timothy J. Wiegand

    MD, FACMT, FAACT, FASAM

    Tim Wiegand MD, DABAM, FACMT, FAACT was trained in internal medicine and completed fellowship training in Medical Toxicology at the University of California, San Francisco in 2006. He was the Medical Director of the Rochester Poison Center until 2010. Dr. Wiegand has been successful in developing a full time, bedside, medical toxicology consultation service and is very active in the practice of Addiction Medicine, having successfully completed his board certification recently. 

    In addition to his primary appointment as Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine & Dentistry in Rochester, NY, Dr. Wiegand serves as Medical Director for Huther Doyle Chemical Dependency Treatment Program in Rochester, NY and as a detoxification specialist for Syracuse Behavioral Health in Rochester, NY. 

    Dr. Wiegand serves on the New York Society of Addiction Medicine (NYSAM) Board of Directors as the Communication Committee Chair and he was recently elected to the American College of Medical Toxicology Board of Directors to begin a 3 year term in October, 2015. He currently serves as the chair of the Addiction Medicine Section for the American College of Medical Toxicology and he recently organized a very successful Addiction Medicine Academy for ACMT prior to their main Annual Scientific Meeting in Clearwater, Florida in March, 2015. Dr. Wiegand has presented for the ASAM Review Course on Pharmacology & Toxicology, MRO and drug testing principles at previous Review Course conferences.

    Norman Wetterau

    MD, FASAM, FAAFP

    Dr. Wetterau is a practicing rural family physician whose practice is mainly addiction medicine. He is the Liaison from ASAM to AAFP, to the PCPCC, and co-chair of the STFM addiction interest group. He is immediate past president of NYSAM and co-chair of ASAM Chapters Council. He is also on the board of COPE (Coalition on Physician Education in Substance Abuse) and clinical assistant professor of family medicine at the University Rochester School of Medicine. In addition he teaches a annual course in behavioral health at Hope Africa Medical School in Burundi.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Integrating Addiction Treatment into General Medical Health Systems (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning how to integrate addiction treatment into general medical health systems, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn that general medical settings are opportune for the identification and initiation of addiction treatment. There is strong evidence for delivering primary care-based alcohol and tobacco screening, brief interventions, and referrals to higher levels of specialty addiction treatment, providing integrated psychiatric, addiction, and general medical treatment, and additional evidence that addiction pharmacotherapies and outpatient psychotherapies can be feasibly delivered in a variety of general medical settings. Collaborative care models have been long-demonstrated to improve depression treatment outcomes in primary care, and there is emerging evidence that these models have applicability to opioid and alcohol use disorders. Population-based chronic disease management is characterized by longitudinal care delivery, integrated and coordinated primary and specialty care, explicitly supported and seamless transitions between care intensities and settings, evidence-based care plans, and the availability of subspecialty expert care. The implementation of an integrated system of care may overcome the barriers to the effective application of chronic disease management for addictive disorders. The existing healthcare system has significant fragmentation, overall access problems, and specific inaccessibility to highly effective addiction treatments. Building an integrated system of care within existing healthcare enterprises requires addressing these factors. Within this context, addiction medicine clinicians often encounter barriers and facilitators associated to the delivery of addiction treatment in general medical settings, particularly with patients with co-occurring addiction and other psychiatric conditions. 

    This session will briefly review the evidence of collaborative care and other integrated care models for addiction medicine clinicians in the general medical setting-based treatment of addiction. The panelists will review the real-world barriers and facilitators to the identification of addiction and initiation of addiction treatment in these settings. The majority of the session will engage workshop participants in a facilitated discussion, where participants will be asked to reflect upon their institutional climates and identify key opportunities for collaborative care in their institutional settings. Participants will be split into small groups where they will be asked to develop and discuss a personal strategy for enriching their own institutional practices and promote the integration of addiction treatment into general health systems. The session will conclude with a large group reflection on the knowledge learned, skills acquired, and inventory of attitudes.

    Brian Hurley

    MD, MBA, DFASAM

    Dr. Brian Hurley is an addiction psychiatrist and Medical Director for Co-Occurring Disorder Services for the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health (LACDMH), supporting the identification and management of co-occurring substance use among patients with mental illness served by LACDMH. He is an assistant professor of Addiction Medicine at UCLA. 

    Brian serves as the Treasurer and is a Distinguished Fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. Brian joined ASAM in 2002 as a first year medical student, and has served on the ASAM Board of Directors in various capacities since 2003. Brian previously served as chair of ASAM’s Membership Committee and Physicians-in-Training Committee and is formerly ASAM’s alternate delegate to the American Medical Association. Brian additionally served on the EVP/CEO search committee in 2010 that led to Penny Mill’s selection as ASAM’s current EVP/CEO. He has additional served in various roles for the Massachusetts Society of Addiction Medicine, New York Society of Addiction Medicine, and California Society of Addiction Medicine.

    Brian completed the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and was previously a Veterans Administration National Quality Scholar at the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System. He completed residency training at the Massachusetts General Hospital and McLean Hospital, where he was Chief Resident in Addiction Psychiatry and addiction psychiatry fellowship training at Bellevue Hospital and the New York Veterans Administration. Brian is a graduate of the Keck School of Medicine and Marshall School of Business of the University of Southern California. He was a 2012 American College of Psychiatrists Laughlin fellow, a 2010-2013 American Psychiatric Association (APA) Public Psychiatry Fellow, and a 2015-2017 Group for Advancement of Psychiatry Fellow. Brian has previously served on the Board of Trustees of the APA.

    Stephen Wyatt

    DO, FASAM

    Stephen Wyatt, D.O, is a Board Certified Psychiatrist with added subspecialty certification in Addiction Psychiatry. He currently serves as the Medical Director of Addiction Medicine for Carolinas HealthCare System, CHS. He is a CHS Professor of Psychiatry and an adjunct clinical faculty member of the University of North Carolina. Dr. Wyatt practiced Emergency Medicine in Michigan for 13 years before entering psychiatry training; finishing in an addiction psychiatry clinical research fellowship at the Yale School of Medicine. He is the current Chairman of the NC Psychiatric Asso. Addiction Psychiatry Committee and the Vice Chair of the Coalition on Physician Education in Substance Use Disorders a national organization focused on addiction medicine medical school education. He participated in the writing of the ASAM Clinical Guidelines for Office Based Opioid Treatment and is a Clinical Expert for the SAMHSA funded Provider Clinical Support System for Medication Assisted Treatment.

    R. Corey Waller

    MD, MS, DFASAM

    R. Corey Waller, MD, MS, FACEP, DFASAM, is an addiction, pain and emergency medicine specialist. Dr. Waller earned his bachelor's degree in biology and his master's degree in neuromolecular biology at Southwest Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas. He earned his medical degree at University of Texas Medical School in San Antonio. Dr. Waller completed his emergency medicine residency at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. He is board certified and fellowship trained in addiction medicine.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Policy Plenary: State Policy Approaches to Addiction Medicine Access and Quality (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning from state policy experts and officials who will discuss state-level strategies to improve addiction medicine quality and access; from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018). This session was made available free of charge by ASAM until 11/16/18.

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn that while the federal government has taken some steps to improve access to and the quality of addiction treatment in recent years, many states also have been busy passing a flurry of laws and writing regulations related to addiction prevention, treatment, and recovery. States hit hard by the opioid overdose epidemic have established Task Forces, declared states of emergency, applied for federal waivers to transform their Medicaid programs, issued naloxone standing orders, and established countless other policies to reduce opioid prescriptions, promote harm reduction strategies, fund treatment, or regulate addiction treatment services. Each state has taken a different approach, but some trends have emerged, allowing for a comparative analysis of policies’ effectiveness and predictions for what policy changes clinicians can expect at home. 

    This Policy Plenary will:

    1. Feature state policy experts and officials who will discuss state-level strategies to improve addiction medicine quality and access;
    2. Highlight examples of policies that have worked well and those that have had unintended consequences, and 
    3. Help equip attendees to be effective advocates for good addiction policies in their states.

    Jay C. Butler

    MD, FAAP, MACP, FIDSA

    Jay C. Butler, MD, CPE, FAAP, MACP, FIDSA was appointed Chief Medical Officer for the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services and Director of the Division of Public Health by Governor Bill Walker in December 2014. He is a graduate of the University of North Carolina Medical School, has completed numerous post-doctoral clinical trainings at Vanderbilt and Emory Universities, and maintains board certifications in infectious diseases, internal medical, and pediatrics. He has authored or co-authored over 100 scientific papers and medical textbook chapters on infectious diseases, vaccines, public health and emergency preparedness. He is an affiliate professor of medicine at the University of Alaska Anchorage. 

    From 2010 to 2014, Dr. Butler was Senior Director for Community Health Services at the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in Anchorage, where he was also a clinical infectious diseases consultant and Medical Director for Infection Control and Employee Health. Earlier work includes serving as Chief Medical Officer of the Alaska Department of Health Social Services from 2007 to 2009, Alaska State Epidemiologist, 2005-07, Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Arctic Investigations Program, 1998-2005, medical epidemiologist in CDC’s National Center for Infectious Diseases in Atlanta, 1991-98, and CDC Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer assigned to the Wisconsin Division of Public Health, 1989-91. 

    He completed over 23 years of service as a U.S. Public Health Service medical officer. He served as Governor of the Alaska Chapter of the American College of Physicians from 2005 to 2009 and was the 2017 President of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. He is a founding member of the new Alaska Chapter of the American Society of Addiction Medicine.

    Daniel Blaney-Koen

    JD, MFA

    Daniel Blaney-Koen, JD, is a senior legislative attorney with the American Medical Association Advocacy Resource Center (ARC). The ARC attorneys focus on working with state and specialty medical societies on state legislative, regulatory and policy advocacy. In addition to his work in the ARC, Daniel has held several roles at the AMA, including serving as a public information officer, policy analyst and speechwriter. Currently, Daniel focuses on state legislation and policy concerning the nation’s opioid epidemic, with particular emphasis on overdose prevention and treatment. Daniel also covers other pharmaceutical issues, insurance market reforms and other issues. Prior to joining the AMA in 1999, Daniel earned his Master of Fine Arts in Poetry from Colorado State University, and his Bachelor's Degree from the University of Arizona. He earned his law degree from the Loyola University Chicago School of Law. Daniel, his wife, two young sons and daughter live in Chicago, Illinois.

    Paul H. Earley

    MD, DFASAM

    Dr. Earley has worked in Addiction Medicine for over 30 years. He treats all types of addictive disorders and specializes in the assessment, treatment and management of health care professionals. As a therapist, he works with patients already in recovery, providing long term therapy for those who suffer from this disease. His professional expertise extends to advocacy for professionals before agencies and licensing boards. 

    Dr. Earley is a dynamic speaker and educator; he speaks and trains on topics of addiction, its treatment and addiction among health care professionals. In addition, he trains therapists about the neurobiological basis of psychotherapy. In his travels, he has provided training in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Italy, Iceland and Switzerland.

    He is the author of two books and several research articles on addiction and its treatment. His most recent book, RecoveryMind Training is an innovative and comprehensive process designed to reengineer addiction treatment. He is a contributing author to the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) Textbook: Principles of Addiction Medicine, as author of the chapter: Physician Health Programs and Addiction among Physicians. He is a contributing author to the ASAM Criteria. His work was featured in the documentary series on addiction entitled Close to Home by Bill Moyers.

    Currently, Dr. Earley is the Medical Director of the Georgia Professionals Health Program, Inc., the Physicians Health Program (PHP) for the state of Georgia and the President-elect of the Federation of State Physician Health Programs (FSPHP). Dr. Earley is the current president-elect of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM). He is a Distinguished Fellow of ASAM and has served on the board of ASAM for over 14 years in several capacities.

    Alexandra Duncan

    DrPH, MPH

    Alexandra Duncan is a senior officer with Pew's substance use prevention and treatment initiative, which works on federal and state initiatives to reduce the inappropriate use of prescription opioids and increase access to evidence-based treatment for substance use disorders. Before joining Pew, Duncan was a research associate at IMPAQ International LLC, where she supported the Center for Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight on issues related to Affordable Care Act compliance with prescription drug and nondiscrimination regulations for high-cost medical conditions, including opioid use disorder, as well as evaluation of health programs. 

    Previously, she was a senior analyst for Abt Associates, working in the division of U.S. health, public health, and epidemiology practice on several projects related to HIV testing and the integration of HIV treatment and substance abuse treatment. Duncan completed postdoctoral training in drug dependence epidemiology at John Hopkins University’s Bloomberg School of Public Health after earning a doctor of public health degree from Columbia University. She also holds a master’s degree in public health from Tulane University and a bachelor’s degree from Bryn Mawr College.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Peering Through the Smoke: Update on Adolescent and Young Adult Tobacco Use (1 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning how to recognize trends in adolescent tobacco use from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn about recent trends in youth smoking and alternate tobacco product use. Behind the steady decrease in traditional cigarette smoking rates in adolescents and young adults hides a new pattern of tobacco and nicotine addiction. E-cigarettes, hookahs, ‘poppers’ (the combination of tobacco and marijuana), and chewable forms of tobacco are increasingly popular among today’s youth, with evidence showing that e-cigarettes are attracting a group of young smokers who most likely would have otherwise never smoked. Less studied and unequally regulated when compared with traditional cigarettes, these alternate tobacco forms present both a challenge and an opportunity for clinicians and policymakers. This session will offer a comprehensive perspective on adolescent and young adult smoking in North America. It will aim to uncover and explore some of tobacco’s newer and alternate forms while highlighting important associations with other substance such as marijuana, and co-morbid medical and mental health conditions. Building on the presenters’ experience with in-patient and outpatient primary, secondary and tertiary care adolescent and young adult populations, the interactive nature of this workshop will allow participants to share challenges and examples from their own practice. Attendees will also have the opportunity to develop new skills and approaches for tobacco prevention and cessation with youth in a rapidly evolving context. This highly interactive workshop will combine short lectures, case simulations and small group discussions. The first part of the workshop will highlight new and emerging forms of tobacco as well as current challenges associated with youth tobacco consumption. Presenters will share compelling new data and evidence on the topic. The second part of the workshop will consist of an interactive presentation including small group discussions about approaches to tobacco prevention and cessation specifically adapted for adolescents and young adults. The third portion of the workshop will consist of case discussions integrating elements from the first two sections of the workshop in a small group discussion format allowing exchange of best practices. Workshop presenters will complement small group presentations with key findings and recommendations from the literature. The workshop will conclude with a large group debrief where participants will have the opportunity to share, comment and ask questions about the case scenarios discussed or other aspects of the workshop.

    Nicholas Chadi

    MD

    Nicholas Chadi is a pediatrician specialized in Adolescent Medicine and is currently a Fellow in Pediatric Addiction Medicine at Boston Children's Hospital. Nicholas grew up in Montreal, Canada, and obtained his medical degree at McGill University. He completed his core pediatric residency at Sainte-Justine University Hospital Center in Montreal where he became chief resident in 2014-2015. He recently completed his sub-specialty training in Adolescent Medicine at the Hospital for Sick Children and a journalism fellowship at the Munk School of Global Affairs in Toronto. He is currently enrolled as a Maters of Public Health student at the Harvard Chan School of Public Health.  His primary research interest is in the prevention and treatment of adolescent tobacco and marijuana use. He recently published a policy statement and practice point on tobacco prevention and cessation for the Canadian Pediatric Society and is part of the 2018 class of Ruth Fox Scholars.

    Karen Leslie

    MD, MEd

    Karen Leslie, MD, MEd is a Professor at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario.

    Trisha Tulloch

    MD, MSc

    Dr. Trisha Tulloch is an Adolescent Medicine Specialist and Lecturer in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Toronto. She completed her Pediatric residency training at Nationwide Children's Hospital and she completed her fellowship training in Adolescent Medicine at the Hospital for Sick Children. Dr. Tulloch is staff pediatrician with the youth concurrent disorders program at the Center for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Toronto. She is a coauthor and faculty instructor for the Youth and Young Adult Tobacco Cessation course through CAMH and the University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine Continuing Education and Professional Development program.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Bridging Gaps: Developing Immediate Access SUD Care in the Face of Crisis (1.5 CME)

    Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning learn what an immediate access, low threshold, transitional drop-in clinic looks like, treating close to 500 patients with Substance Use Disorder since 2016, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn what immediate access clinical care looks like, as seen through The Massachusetts General Hospital Bridge clinic; a multidisciplinary, immediate access low threshold transitional clinic which has provided over 4039 visits to 460 patients since opening in 2016. We offer medication management, recovery coaching and optional peer-support and psychoeducation groups to individuals unable to access care in the community. The primary goal is to engage people by “meeting them where they are," and to initiate pharmacotherapy, followed by stabilization and eventually linkage to community based treatment. Flexible drop-in scheduling is critical to our model. Half of all visits are not scheduled ahead and 80% of patients have at some point utilized same day appointments while 63% have utilized walk in services. The 30 day readmission rate for Bridge Clinic patients who have had a recent inpatient stay is only 10.4 %. This clinic also serves in a complementary role to an inpatient addiction consult team (ACT), the emergency department, the obstetrics department, as well as all outpatient departments. The Bridge Clinic provides a "consult and return model" for complex patients cared for in the MGH primary care clinics who need stabilization in a low threshold environment, as well as to mentor newly waivered buprenorphine providers and trainees. 

    This focus session will describe the need for such models of care, lessons learned, review of outcomes and the nuts and bolts needed to start and run this type of clinic model, providing attendees with concrete tools to start their own Bridge Clinic.

    Laura Kehoe

    MD, MPH, FASAM

    Laura Kehoe, MD, MPH, FASAM, is a medical director at the Bridge Clinic, Substance Use Disorder Initiative, for the Massachusetts General Hospital.  Dr. Kehoe is also Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and is board certified in both Internal Medicine and Addiction Medicine. She attended Tufts University School of Medicine and Boston University School of Public Health and completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital. At Massachusetts General Hospital, she is the Medical Director of the Substance Use Disorder Bridge Clinic, an innovative, “on demand,” urgent care addiction program, and an attending physician on the inpatient Addiction Consult Team (ACT). In addition, she is the co-chair of the hospital-wide Substance Use Disorder Education Committee, where she works with other team members to expand evidence-based treatment of patients with addiction, and is actively involved in resident physician training.

    Sarah Wakeman

    MD, FASAM

    Sarah E. Wakeman, MD is the Medical Director for the Mass General Hospital Substance Use Disorder Initiative, program director of the Mass General Addiction Medicine fellowship, and an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. She is also the Medical Director of the Mass General Hospital Addiction Consult Team, co-chair of the Mass General Opioid Task Force, and clinical lead of the Partners Healthcare Substance Use Disorder Initiative. She is the Medical Director of RIZE Massachusetts, a state-wide, private sector initiative created to build a $50 million fund to implement and evaluate innovative interventions to address the opioid overdose crisis. She received her A.B. from Brown University and her M.D. from Brown Medical School. She completed residency training in internal medicine and served as Chief Medical Resident at Mass General Hospital. She is a diplomate and fellow of the American Board of Addiction Medicine. She is chair of the policy committee for the Massachusetts Society of Addiction Medicine. She served on Massachusetts' Governor Baker’s Opioid Addiction Working Group. Nationally, she is chair of the American Society of Addiction Medicine Drug Court Task Force and serves on their ethics committee.Clinically she provides specialty addiction and general medical care in the inpatient and outpatient setting at Mass General Hospital and the Mass General Charlestown Health Center. Her research interests include evaluating models for integrated substance use disorder treatment in medical settings, recovery coaching, physician attitudes and practice related to substance use disorder, and screening for substance use in primary care.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.