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  • Using Public Health Datasets to Understand the Opioid Overdose Crisis (1 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning how to describe commonly used datasets and highlight how public health data analysis can inform clinical and policy recommendations as well as advocacy from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn that the opioid overdose crisis has evolved significantly in recent years. Between 2010 and 2015, annual opioid prescribing actually dropped from 782 MME to 640 MME per capita but opioid overdose deaths increased by 63%, mainly due to an increase in overdoses involving heroin and fentanyl. To understand this changing epidemiology, state and local agencies are increasingly relying on analyses of large datasets to inform the public health response. In this focus session, addiction specialists, academic researchers and public health experts working in two states, Illinois and Massachusetts, will describe commonly used datasets and highlight how public health data analysis can inform clinical and policy recommendations as well as advocacy. 

    We will begin the session with a brief overview of different datasets commonly maintained by state agencies, including vital records, hospital and emergency room administrative data, emergency medical service logs, syndromic surveillance of emergency room visits, infectious diseases surveillance systems and prescription monitoring programs (PMP). 

    Detailed examples of analyses of these datasets will be presented. For example, in Illinois and Massachusetts PMP records were linked to death certificates of individuals who died of opioid overdose. We found that in Massachusetts, opioids that had been prescribed were often not present on overdose toxicology and were rarely the sole opioids present at death. In Illinois, we identified demographic differences such as sex, race and rural vs. non-rural residence between the fatal overdoses involving commonly prescribed opioids as opposed to those involving heroin, fentanyl, or fentanyl analogues. Other analyses to be presented include prescribing patterns of opioids and benzodiazepines in the last year of life, missed opportunities to intercept with high risk individuals in the setting of non-fatal overdose, rates of substance use disorder diagnosis at the time of fatal overdose, and prescribing of buprenorphine prior to death. 

    The examples above illustrate how public health agencies utilize population level datasets to inform public health policy, clinical guidelines, funding applications and treatment advocacy. We will highlight the advantages and limitations of this approach and appraise the implications for clinical research and practice. We will discuss common challenges in performing such analyses, including laws governing access to data and agency siloing. Potential strategies to address these barriers will be described, including stakeholder engagement and legislative change. Participants will be invited to discuss how this integrated approach to public health data might affect their patients’ care and privacy.

    Alexander Y. Walley

    MD, MSc, FASAM

    Alexander Y. Walley, M.D., M.Sc., is an Associate Professor of Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, a general internist and addiction medicine specialist at Boston Medical Center. He is the director of the Addiction Medicine Fellowship program and founded the Inpatient Addiction Consult Service at Boston Medical Center. He does clinical and research-related work on the medical complications of substance use, specifically HIV and overdose. He provides primary care and office-based buprenorphine treatment for HIV patients and methadone maintenance treatment. He is the medical director for the Massachusetts Department of Public Health’s Opioid Overdose Prevention Pilot Program. 

    Elizabeth M. Salisbury-Afshar

    MD, MPH, FAAFP, FASAM, FACPM

    Elizabeth Salisbury-Afshar, MD, MPH serves as the Medical Director of Behavioral Health for the Chicago Department of Public Health and is an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Family Medicine and Psychiatry, Section of Population and Behavioral Health, at Rush University Medical Center. She is certified in family medicine, addiction medicine and preventive medicine/general public health. Elizabeth previously served as Medical Director of Behavioral Health Systems Baltimore- a quasi-public entity that oversees all publicly funded addiction and mental health treatment in Baltimore City. In this role, she helped develop and implement the Baltimore City Overdose Prevention Plan. Elizabeth came back to Chicago in 2014 and served as Medical Director of Heartland Health Outreach (HHO), a federally qualified health center and healthcare for the homeless provider (330H) in Chicago. While at HHO, she expanded their addiction treatment services and developed a medication assisted treatment program. 

    Elizabeth has been working with the Chicago Department of Public Health since September of 2016 and continues to volunteer seeing patients in the medication assisted treatment program at HHO. In her role with the City Health Department, she guides the Department's work in the area of substance use as it relates to data analysis, policy, programming initiatives, and funding allocation.

    Mai Tuyet Pho

    MD, MPH

    Mai Tuyet Pho, MD MPH is an infectious diseases physician and health outcomes researcher at the University of Chicago. Her work seeks to improve health outcomes and public policy at the intersection of HIV, hepatitis C, and substance use. Current projects includes understanding the shifting epidemiology of HCV and opioid overdose, network characterization of people who inject drugs in rural communities, linkage to HCV care at reentry for criminal justice involved individuals, and economic evaluation of treatment coverage policies. Dr. Pho served as the interim Chief Medical Officer at the Illinois Department of Public Health and is currently a Medical Advisor for Healthcare Policy and Research. She leads multiple efforts at the Department around the opioid epidemic and HCV, including analysis on fatal and nonfatal overdose, HCV surveillance, naloxone overdose prevention and GME education around safe opioid prescribing. She is a member of the Illinois Statewide Opioid Crisis Response Advisory Council. 

    Ali B. Abbasi

    MSci, MPhil

    Ali Abbasi MSci MPhil is a Medical Student at the University of Chicago. He also works at the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH), assisting the office of Director Nirav Shah on data research projects. He focuses on linking large state datasets to help policy makers better understand the epidemiology of opioid overdoses in Illinois. He holds an MPhil in Computational Biology from the University of Cambridge.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Addiction Medical Management with Patients that Use Cannabis (1 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while preparing yourself as a clinician to provide addiction medical management and/or psychiatric care in patients who also use cannabis, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.0 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn that the prevalence of cannabis use is expected to increase in light of ongoing regulatory changes permitting the legal sale and use of cannabis. People with any substance use disorder use cannabis at a greater rate than those without a substance use disorder, and additional availability of cannabis is associated with increased rates of cannabis use in this population. Further, there is a well documented association between cannabis use and chronic psychotic disorders, with some investigators suggesting a causal relationship between cannabis use and the development of a subsequent chronic psychotic disorder. Therefore, people who come to the attention of addiction medicine physicians and to psychiatrists are increasingly likely to use cannabis. Furthermore, a firm understanding of the association between cannabis use, other substance use disorders, and psychiatric symptoms and conditions will be critical to the modern practice of addiction medicine. 

    This presentation is designed to prepare clinicians to provide addiction medical management and/or psychiatric care in patients who also use cannabis. This presentation will be divided into three sections. First, recent research on the treatment of substance use disorders and other psychiatric disorders with co-occurring cannabis use will be reviewed. In addition, a sample patient handout that summarizes this material will be provided. Management implications will be discussed, specifically including the importance of motivational interviewing to clarify patients’ own motivation to change their cannabis use, as a component of their medical treatment. Next, the presenters will review motivational interviewing techniques, including using the brief negotiated interview, and discuss how it can be utilized when managing patients who present with co-occurring cannabis use. 

    In the last section, participants will be divided into small groups and practice using motivational interviewing techniques applied in the context of three sample cases of patients who regularly use cannabis. These cases will include: 1) a 27-year-old college student who seeks treatment for anxiety, 2) a 45-year-old veteran who seeks treatment for insomnia and PTSD symptoms, 3) and a 17-year-old adolescent who is brought by parents for chronic irritability. The workshop will conclude with an open discussion of these cases and the implications of cannabis on addiction medicine and psychiatric clinical practice.

    Iman Parhami

    MD, MPH

    Iman Parhami, MD, MPH is a double-board certified child and adolescent psychiatrist focused on addictions. Dr. Parhami currently sees adult patients at a LA County's community mental health clinic, where he is also the co-leader of the Co-Occurring Disorders Clinic. In addition, he is the psychiatrist for two residential treatment centers for adolescents with substance use problems and he sees patients at USC's University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities at Children's Hospital of Los Angeles. 

    Dr. Parhami completed his child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship at Johns Hopkins University and his adult psychiatry residency at Delaware's State program. During his training, he received multiple national recognition awards, which included a research training grant from the American Academy of Children and Adolescents and National Institute of Drug Use, and other awards from the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry and American Psychiatric Association. Dr. Parhami has published multiple peer-reviewed scientific journal articles focusing on addictive disorders. Notably, Dr. Parhami completed a postdoctoral research fellowship at UCLA focusing on psychosocial interventions for behavioral addictions and a clinical fellowship at the Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia.

    Brian Hurley

    MD, MBA, DFASAM

    Dr. Brian Hurley is an addiction psychiatrist and Medical Director for Co-Occurring Disorder Services for the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health (LACDMH), supporting the identification and management of co-occurring substance use among patients with mental illness served by LACDMH. He is an assistant professor of Addiction Medicine at UCLA. 

    Brian serves as the Treasurer and is a Distinguished Fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. Brian joined ASAM in 2002 as a first year medical student, and has served on the ASAM Board of Directors in various capacities since 2003. Brian previously served as chair of ASAM’s Membership Committee and Physicians-in-Training Committee and is formerly ASAM’s alternate delegate to the American Medical Association. Brian additionally served on the EVP/CEO search committee in 2010 that led to Penny Mill’s selection as ASAM’s current EVP/CEO. He has additional served in various roles for the Massachusetts Society of Addiction Medicine, New York Society of Addiction Medicine, and California Society of Addiction Medicine.

    Brian completed the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and was previously a Veterans Administration National Quality Scholar at the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System. He completed residency training at the Massachusetts General Hospital and McLean Hospital, where he was Chief Resident in Addiction Psychiatry and addiction psychiatry fellowship training at Bellevue Hospital and the New York Veterans Administration. Brian is a graduate of the Keck School of Medicine and Marshall School of Business of the University of Southern California. He was a 2012 American College of Psychiatrists Laughlin fellow, a 2010-2013 American Psychiatric Association (APA) Public Psychiatry Fellow, and a 2015-2017 Group for Advancement of Psychiatry Fellow. Brian has previously served on the Board of Trustees of the APA.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Collateral Damage: Pregnant Women with Interruption of MAT Due to Incarceration (1 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while comparing and contrasting the harmful and unintended effects, evident through three case studies, that involve pregnant, opioid-dependent patients, who became incarcerated, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.0 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn about how the opioid epidemic continues to rage across the nation, it is estimated that as many as 85% of inmates have a substance use disorder. An estimated 25%--and growing—of those people have opioid dependence. For some people, their opioid dependence is upon medication-assisted treatment with either methadone or buprenorphine. "Jailhouse Detox", or interruption of medication-assisted treatment due to incarceration, has been demonstrated to have deleterious effects on people with opioid use disorder. When people who are previously established on MAT are incarcerated and no longer receiving their medication, not only do those people suffer prolonged, severe withdrawal, but may also resort to substance use while incarcerated, often with unsafe injection practices which increase risk of transmission of HIV, Hepatitis B and C, and bacterial infections. Increased rates of recidivism, overdose, and death are also demonstrated upon release. People who experience an interruption or cessation of MAT while incarcerated are less likely to return to treatment upon release. Although pregnant women are perhaps the population with the best access to MAT while incarcerated, there persist significant barriers to continuation of pharmacotherapy in many areas of the country. When medication-assisted treatment is interrupted due to incarceration, pregnant women suffer. Stopping medication-assisted treatment in pregnancy is in direct opposition to every major organizations’ recommendations regarding MAT in pregnancy; there is unanimous agreement that continued receipt of MAT in pregnancy improves both maternal and fetal outcomes, and is considered the standard of care. 

    In a collaborative agreement between Denver Health and Hospital Outpatient Behavioral Health Services and Denver County Jail, we have developed a mechanism for methadone induction and/or continuation for pregnant women with opioid use disorder. However, due to significant differences between Denver County and surrounding county jail systems, we have documented several cases within the past year of poor maternal outcomes for pregnant women who experience interruption of medication-assisted treatment. 

    Utilizing these case studies, we will examine area of weakness and opportunities for growth in caring for pregnant, incarcerated women with opioid use disorder. Exploring and learning from these women's experiences has motivated increased policy and political advocacy among medication-assisted treatment and obstetric providers, who seek to increase equivalence of care for pregnant women with respects to MAT. Increasing access to MAT for all incarcerated people should be a priority, starting with pregnant women as one of these most vulnerable populations.

    Kaylin Klie

    MD, MA, FASAM

    Kaylin A. Klie, MD MA is a dually-board certified physician in Family Medicine and Addiction Medicine, with a clinical focus in perinatal addiction and the integration of addiction medicine into primary care at the University of Colorado, whereshe  is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Family Medicine. Prior to medicine, Dr Klie trained as a Marriage and Family Therapist. She then completed medical school at Rush Medical College. She completed residency in Family Medicine followed by fellowship in Addiction Medicine at the University of Colorado. She is the founder of the Denver Health and University of Colorado OB Addiction Medicine clinics, where pregnant and mothering women are provided integrated prenatal/post-partum care and substance use disorder treatment. She serves as the associate director for the University of Colorado Addiction Medicine Fellowship, and is core faculty for the University of Colorado Addiction Psychiatry Fellowhip. She enjoys teaching and mentoring medical students, PA students, residents from a variety of training programs, and addiction fellows.She is an active member of the American Society of Addiction Medicine, Colorado Society of Addiction Medicine, the Colorado Substance Exposed Newborn Collaborative, Alpha Omega Alpha, and the ASAM Women's Action Group. She lives in Denver, CO with her husband and son.

    Michelle Gaffaney

    PA-C

    Michelle Gaffaney PA-C, Behavioral Health Consult Liaison Service at Denver Health Hospital and Outpatient Behavioral Health Services, University of Colorado Department of Psychiatry Faculty. Masters of Physician Assistant Studies from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus CHA/PA Program. Bachelors of Arts in Biological Sciences from North Dakota State University.

    Amanda Langer

    LCSW, CACII

    Amanda Langer, LCSW, CACII is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and Certified Addiction Counselor , and currently works as a Therapeutic Case Worker and Care Manager in Denver Health’s integrated health care system.  Ms. Langer’s primary focus is working with pregnant patients struggling with substance use, with a history of substance use, or on a Medicated Assisted Treatment Medication. Patients are referred to and assessed for service needs by Ms. Langer for coordination of care during pregnancy through outpatient settings, the jail system, and the Women’s Care Clinic. Ms. Langer connects them to both community and hospital-based services, and provides care throughout the pregnancy and post-partum. Ms. Langer graduated from University of Colorado in 2003 with a BA in Psychology and Sociology and worked as a residential treatment counselor with at-risk youth until returning to school to obtain her Master’s in Social Work in 2011. Since graduating, Ms. Langer has worked providing clinical and case management services to patient’s struggling with addiction releasing from incarceration, with probation and parole sentences, co-occurring disorders, and providing therapeutic services for high-risk patients on Medicated Assisted Treatment Medications. Ms. Langer began working with addiction during pregnancy specialist Dr. Kaylin Klie, MDMA in the Denver Health System in February of 2017 to help connect pregnant women and their partners to treatment services and decrease the ripple of trauma for families.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Effectiveness of XR-Naltrexone vs. Buprenorphine: Results of Two Randomized Trials (1 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about the only head-to-head randomized trials comparing buprenorphine to XR-naltrexone from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.0 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn about he only head-to-head randomized trials comparing buprenorphine to XR-naltrexone. Opioid use disorders are a major public health problem across North America and many other parts of the world with increasing prevalence and mortality from overdoses. Effective medications exist, including agonist substitution strategies with the full agonist methadone and partial agonist buprenorphine. The antagonist naltrexone was of limited effectiveness when only available in pill form due to poor adherence, but long-acting injectable naltrexone, as well as long-acting implants in some countries, have shown clear effectiveness compared to counseling without medication, placebo, or oral naltrexone. Thus, clinicians and their patients with opioid use disorder now have a choice between medications with distinct mechanisms of action—agonist or antagonist. However, there have been no head-to-head trials comparing these two approaches and informing patient-treatment matching, or helping clinicians and patients judge which medication would be best for an individual patient. Two independently conducted randomized controlled trials concluded in 2016-2017, and each compared extended-release naltrexone monthly injections to buprenorphine-naloxone film daily self-administration for the prevention of heroin/opioid use and relapse among adults initially admitted to inpatient detoxification units and discharged to outpatient management. 

    The NIDA Clinical Trials Network 0051 Study, X:BOT, was an 8-site 24-week RCT among N=570 participants estimating rates of a primary opioid relapse outcome by arm. In Norway, a 5-site 12-week RCT among N=164 participants, sponsored by the Research Council of Norway, included a primary non-inferiority comparison of rates of (non-buprenorphine) opioid use and treatment retention. This focused session will present the designs and main results from the two randomized, comparative effectiveness trials of extended-release naltrexone versus buprenorphine-naloxone; Lee and Rotrosen will present X:BOT main results, Tanum those of the Norwegian trial. Secondary analyses of overdose outcomes, patient matching and moderators of medication effectiveness, and important similarities and contrasts between the two trials’ methods and results will be summarized in third presentation by Nunes. The presenters will lead a concluding panel and audience discussion of the findings and implications for community practice, both in the US and Norway. Questions will be encouraged throughout the session, following each presentation.

    Joshua D. Lee

    MD, MSc, FASAM

    Joshua D. Lee MD, MSc is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Population Health and Medicine at the NYU School of Medicine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Addiction Medicine and is a physician at Bellevue Hospital Center, NYU Langone Medical Center, and in the NYC jails. He directs the NYU ABAM Fellowship in Addiction Medicine. His research focuses on novel and medication treatments for addiction among criminal justice and primary care populations.

    John Rotrosen

    MD

    Dr. Rotrosen is Professor of Psychiatry at New York University School of Medicine. He attended NYU School of Medicine from 1968 to 1972 and completed a Psychiatry Research Residency at NYU and Bellevue Hospital in 1976. Subsequent research training was supported in part by an NIMH Research Scientist Career Development Award under the mentorship of Drs. Samuel Gershon and Burt Angrist. From 1980 through 1997, he served as Chief, Psychiatry Service, and from 1997 to 2013, as Associate Chief of Staff for Mental Health Research at the VA Medical Center in New York. His research has focused on addictive disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia and movement disorders, addressing pathophysiology, pharmacological and behavioral intervention, and translation to community settings. His research group has contributed to the development of many of the atypical antipsychotic agents and to the development of new medications, novel forms of medication delivery, and behavioral therapies for opiate, cocaine, alcohol and nicotine dependence. He was PI of the NY VAMC-based NIDA/VA Medications Development Research Unit from 1995-2001 and PI of the NY Node of the NIDA Clinical Trials Network (and currently one of the two PIs of the merged Greater NY Node). He recently served on the National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse (NIDA Council) and previously on NIMH Council. Current work in addictive disorders includes studies on clinical genetics, neuroimaging, medication and behavioral therapies development, implementation in mainstream healthcare settings, services and healthcare disparities, and practice improvement. He chairs and serves as a member of data monitoring and safety boards and as a medical monitor for several studies and serves as a key mentor to a multi-disciplinary group of trainees, K-awardees and junior faculty.

    Edward Nunes

    MD

    Dr. Nunes is a Professor of Psychiatry, and Principal Investigator of the Greater New York Node of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) clinical Trials Network as well as other NIDA funded studies on behavioral and medication treatments for substance dependence and related psychiatric disorders. Interests and ongoing studies include treatments for cocaine dependence in general, heroin and other opioid dependence, for nicotine dependence in general, and for addicted patients with co-occurring psychiatric disorders including depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Types of treatment under study include medication treatments (naltrexone, buprenorphine, mirtazapine) as well as behavioral and psychotherapeutic approaches and computer-delivered treatments. Dr. Nunes also studies the challenges involved in implementing evidence-based treatments for substance use disorders in real-world community-based treatments settings. Dr. Nunes also serves on the American Board of Addiction Medicine, Co-Chair of the Columbia/ New York State Psychiatric Institute's Institutional Review Board, and has been appointed to the National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse.

    Lars Tanum

    PhD

    Lars Tanum, M.D., Ph.D., is an Associate Professor, Norwegian Centre for Addiction Research at the University of Oslo, Norway, and Head of Research Unit, Department of R&D in Mental Health Services, Akershus University Hospital, Norway. 

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Primary Care Based Recovery Coaching and SUD Pharmacotherapy Reduces Hospital Utilization (1 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning how to implement primary care based recovery coaches coupled with integrated addiction treatment across four practices affiliated with a large academic medical center and the effect on acute care utilization for patients with substance use disorder from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.0 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn that substance use disorder (SUD) results in tremendous healthcare costs. Several components of SUD treatment have been shown to reduce inpatient and emergency department utilization, including pharmacotherapy and integrated addiction and primary care for individuals with substance-related medical conditions. 

    No studies have examined the impact of integrated addiction treatment in primary care, which includes recovery coaches in addition to pharmacotherapy, on utilization.Intervention: We integrated treatment into primary care practices with the formation of multi-disciplinary teams of local champions, access to pharmacotherapy with buprenorphine and extended-release naltrexone, counseling, and recovery coaching. The champion teams met bi-monthly with two addiction specialists for case conferences. Recovery coaches were included in each intervention practice to assist patients through addressing barriers to treatment and providing motivational support. Recovery coaches were required to have two years of sobriety, took a five-day course in recovery coaching, worked full-time within the primary care site, and provided in-person, telephonic and text messaging support to patients.

    Methods: We identified patients with a SUD diagnosis, excluding cannabis or tobacco only, receiving consistent primary care at four practices in a nine-month baseline period prior to the intervention. The starting dates varied from October 2014 to December 2015 depending on site. Baseline was defined as the 9-month period prior to intervention and follow-up period was the same nine calendar months one year after the baseline period. We selected control patients from practices without intervention, matching on: age; race, SUD, Charlson comorbidity score; and similar utilization during baseline period. Matched pairs were compared for utilization during a nine-month follow-up period.Results: There were 1870 patients identified from the intervention practices and 5170 from control practices; 445 matched pairs were found based on the matching criteria. Drug use disorder NOS (received by 77% of patients) was the most common diagnosis, followed by opioid use disorder (55%) and alcohol use disorder (24%). 

    There was an increase in utilization in both groups, however the magnitude of increase was higher in control practices. The mean number of inpatient admissions during the follow-up period was 10.6/100 patients for the intervention and 13.7/100 patients for the control group (p=0.18). The total number of hospital days in the follow-up period was 237 days for the intervention and 328 days for the control group (p=0.0001). The mean number of ED visits during follow-up was 23.8/100 patients for the intervention and 33.5/100 patients for the control group (p=0.007).

    Conclusion: Integrated addiction pharmacotherapy and recovery coaching in primary care resulted in fewer hospital days and ED visits for patients with SUD compared to similarly matched patients in practices without these services.

    Sarah Wakeman

    MD, FASAM

    Sarah E. Wakeman, MD is the Medical Director for the Mass General Hospital Substance Use Disorder Initiative, program director of the Mass General Addiction Medicine fellowship, and an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. She is also the Medical Director of the Mass General Hospital Addiction Consult Team, co-chair of the Mass General Opioid Task Force, and clinical lead of the Partners Healthcare Substance Use Disorder Initiative. She is the Medical Director of RIZE Massachusetts, a state-wide, private sector initiative created to build a $50 million fund to implement and evaluate innovative interventions to address the opioid overdose crisis. She received her A.B. from Brown University and her M.D. from Brown Medical School. She completed residency training in internal medicine and served as Chief Medical Resident at Mass General Hospital. She is a diplomate and fellow of the American Board of Addiction Medicine. She is chair of the policy committee for the Massachusetts Society of Addiction Medicine. She served on Massachusetts' Governor Baker’s Opioid Addiction Working Group. Nationally, she is chair of the American Society of Addiction Medicine Drug Court Task Force and serves on their ethics committee.Clinically she provides specialty addiction and general medical care in the inpatient and outpatient setting at Mass General Hospital and the Mass General Charlestown Health Center. Her research interests include evaluating models for integrated substance use disorder treatment in medical settings, recovery coaching, physician attitudes and practice related to substance use disorder, and screening for substance use in primary care.

    Nancy Rigotti

    MD

    Dr. Nancy Rigotti is a primary care physician who trained in internal medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), where she is Associate Chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine and a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.  An internationally-known expert on tobacco use and treatment,  Dr. Rigotti has long advocated for improving the delivery of tobacco dependence treatment in the health care system.  She founded and directs MGH’s Tobacco Research and Treatment Center, which combines a clinical treatment program, the MGH Tobacco Treatment Service, with a multidisciplinary research group that develops, test, and disseminate interventions for smoking cessation across outpatient and inpatient settings.  Working at the junction of medicine and public health, Dr. Rigotti’s work combines efforts to change individual behavior with community, policy, and health care system efforts to influence individuals’ decisions about starting or continuing to smoke.

    Yuchiao Chang

    PhD

    Dr. Chang is a statistician based in the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of General Internal Medicine. As part of this role, Dr. Chang provides biostatistical support for a number of TRTC projects. Additionally, she has collaborated on various grants with investigators from many different specialties. Dr. Chang also supports the research efforts in the Mongan Institute and is involved in many hospital operations improvement projects.

    Dr. Chang participated in the Mass General Clinical Research Program from 1997 to 2001. Through this activity, she provided statistical consultation to the entire Mass General community. Over the years, Dr. Chang has provided extensive formal and informal teaching to her clinical colleagues to improve their understanding of statistical science. A great extent of her effort involves educating fellows about design and analysis issues in their research projects.

    Joshua Metlay

    MD, PhD

    Dr. Metlay received his bachelor's degree from Yale University, his PhD in Immunology from Rockefeller University, and his MD from Cornell University Medical College.  He completed residency and chief residency in internal medicine at the University of Pittsburgh and a fellowship in general internal medicine and epidemiology at the Massachusetts General Hospital.  He also received a Master of Science in Health Policy and Management from the Harvard School of Public Health. 

    Dr. Metlay's research spans two major areas, the epidemiology of drug resistance among common bacterial respiratory pathogens, particularly S. pneumoniae and the development and evaluation of interventions to improve the quality of treatment decisions for respiratory tract infections.  This research has led to numerous federal grants from NIAID, CDC, and AHRQ and roles on national advisory committees in the area of infectious diseases epidemiology.

    Dr. Metlay is dedicated to education and mentorship.  He has been recognized with a number of honors including the Lindback Foundation Award for Distinguished Teaching in 2008 (Pen's highest teaching honor), the Mid-Career Research and Mentorship Award from the Society of General Internal Medicine in 2010, and the Arthur Asbury Outstanding Faculty Mentorship Award from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in 2011. 

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Healthcare & Drug Court Partnerships (1 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning how the court system works, how drug courts operate, and ways to create effective partnerships with criminal justice professionals, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.0 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will gain an understanding of how the court system works, how drug courts operate, and ways to create effective partnerships with criminal justice professionals. Specific attention will be directed toward shared clients who need, or are prescribed, Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT). This presentation will give healthcare providers a broad overview of the how the court system works with focused attention given to understanding the operations of drug and sobriety courts. Barriers to effective collaboration with the courts will be discussed (e.g., legal issues, confidentiality concerns, stigma of MAT, etc.) and strategies to navigating these challenges will be shared. Attendees will leave with a firm understanding of how the court system is structured, how drug courts work, and tools to help medical providers more effectively work with the courts and advocate for shared clients who are in need of, or are prescribed, MAT. 

    Persons with an addiction disorder rarely interact with only one healthcare system or provider. Yet coordination and collaboration between healthcare, addiction treatment, and other systems is often poorly executed. As we continue to see death rates increase around the country, it is critical we start building broader systems of care. This presentation will focus on building better coordination between healthcare and criminal justice, with specific focus on drug courts. We will address the importance of dismantling barriers such as concerns about confidentiality and stigma of MAT. We will provide specific strategies for improving collaboration among systems, thus building better and more effective systems of care for individuals suffering from an addiction disorder.

    Michele Virva

    LMSW

    Michele (Shelly) Virva is a licensed master's level social worker, currently working with Dr. Corey Waller at the Spectrum Health Medical Group Center for Integrative Medicine, a specialty clinic for high frequency ED utilizers and pregnant women on controlled substances. Shelly has earned her Bachelors of Arts in political science and a Masters of Social Work from Western Michigan University. She has extensive experience in the treatment of substance use and co-occurring disorders, pregnancy and substance use disorders, crisis intervention, integrated care, and treatment of complex care patients. She has a strong interest in evidenced based treatment, research and system development. Currently, she is working with a private philanthropy in Ca. developing integrated care clinics for high opioid users. Prior to this she was part of a team working on integrating behavioral health into a multisite primary care group. She has worked with a large regional health plan in Michigan to incorporate medication assisted treatment into their benefit structure, and has co-authored the Michigan Medication Assistance Treatment Program Guidelines with Dr. Corey Waller.

    Andrew Brown

    MPA, MSW

    Andy Brown is the Program Coordinator for the Ottawa County Recovery Court located in Michigan. He has served in this position for eight years and holds Masters Degrees in Public Administration and Social Work and is a Fellows with the National Center for State Courts. His recovery court is currently recognized as one of nine national mentor courts in the United States by the US Department of Justice and the National Association of Drug Court Professionals. Andy has a strong desire to build constructive working relationships between the courts and community partners who serve our common clientele.

    Tyson Smith

    PhD

    No Bio Available.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.0 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Unhealthy Alcohol Use: Update on the Forgotten Epidemic (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning how to manage alcohol withdrawal and understand the evidence for the use of pharmacotherapy in the treatment of alcohol use disorder, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn that/about the epidemic forgotten in light of the opioid epidemic. The prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use appears to be increasing, yet attention to it has not been commensurate with its prevalence and impact on health and society. It seems to be hidden or forgotten. First we will review data (some, conflicting) on the rising prevalence and impact of alcohol use on health, and the role alcohol plays in consequences of other drug use. Next, we will discuss validated approaches for identification, challenges in assessment relevant to general health settings, and initial management. Management of alcohol withdrawal will be reviewed by clinical champions contributing to ASAM's practice guideline revision. We will review the evidence for the 4 FDA approved medications and address the efficacy or lack thereof for others. Finally, we address integrated care management for alcohol use disorder including generalists and addiction specialist roles. The main goal is to review what clinical science tells us about how to care for people with unhealthy alcohol use.

    Richard Saitz

    MD, MPH, DFASAM, FACP

    Richard Saitz MD, MPH, FACP, DFASAM is a general internist (DABIM) and primary care physician, an addiction medicine specialist (DABAM), Chair and Professor of Community Health Sciences at Boston University (BU) School of Public Health, and Professor of Medicine at BU School of Medicine. He Chaired the Treatment and Services review committee for the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, is Associate Editor of JAMA and Senior Editor of Journal of Addiction Medicine, Section Editor and sole author of key chapters in UpToDate on unhealthy substance use, an editor of the ASAM Principles of Addiction Medicine, and author of >200 peer-reviewed publications http://profiles.bu.edu/display/151440 http://www.bu.edu/sph/profile/richard-saitz/ He was Director of Boston Medical Center’s Clinical Addiction Research and Education (CARE) Unit for over a decade, has been Chairman of an Institutional Review Board, Associate Director of Clinical Research for BU, President of the Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA), steering committee member of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers (MINT), and was coordinating committee member of International Network for Brief Intervention for Alcohol and other drug problems (INEBRIA). He is Vice President of the International Society of Addiction Journal Editors (ISAJE). His primary areas of expertise supported by NIH, RWJF, and SAMHSA, are screening and brief intervention, integrating substance-related and general health care, improving the quality of care for people with unhealthy substance use, particularly in general health settings, and basing care on science. He validated single-item screening questions recommended by NIDA and NIAAA. Awards: Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society, Boston Jaycees Ten Outstanding Young Leaders Award, Best Doctors in America®, AMERSA’s W. Anderson Spickard, Jr. Excellence in Mentorship Award, the R. Brinkley Smithers Distinguished Scientist Award (ASAM), Research Society on Alcoholism Distinguished Researcher Award.

    Darius Rastegar

    MD

    Dr. Rastegar provides treatment for substance use disorders in an outpatient primary care setting and an inpatient unit.  He is an Associate Professor of Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and is the medical director for the Chemical Dependence Unit at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center.  He is the co-author of The ASAM Handbook of Addiction Medicine.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Lifelong Learning: Review of Articles for Addiction Medicine Tmoc Part 2 (1 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning how to use Tmoc for professional development from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.0 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn that Transitional Maintenance of Certification (Tmoc) is a fundamental part of Addiction Medicine certification for current ABAM Diplomates, and it can be important for patient care as well as professional development. Tmoc Part 2 (also known as Lifelong Learning and Self-Assessment) involves reading medical literature and answering questions based on articles, which is not always easy, especially for new or busy addiction medicine certified physicians. This workshop will help meet Tmoc Part 2 requirements for attendees who are certified in Addiction Medicine. Attendees who are not certified in addiction medicine can still learn about recent research from across the spectrum of the field of Addiction Medicine. This information will be discussed in terms of clinical relevance to patient care. Several new articles from the SAMs will be described and discussed by experienced researcher-educators in Addiction Medicine from around the United States in an unbiased fashion, with attention paid to both strengths and limitations of each article. Conclusions: Participants will gain an appreciation of the scope of recent research in Addiction Medicine and how it may impact patient care. In addition, participants will learn about new research that may potentially affect their practice. Addiction Medicine certified physicians who attend and are participating in Tmoc will be able to answer Part 2 Self-Assessment Module questions for Tmoc credit during this workshop.

    Michael Fingerhood

    MD, FACP

    Dr. Michael Fingerhood is an Associate Professor of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University. He is the Chief of the Division of Chemical Dependence and medical director of the Comprehensive Care Practice (CCP) at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The CCP integrates substance abuse treatment with primary medical care, including care for HIV and hepatitis C.

    Gavin Bart

    MD, PhD, FACP, DFASAM

    Dr. Gavin Bart is Director of the Division of Addiction Medicine at Hennepin County Medical Center and Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Minnesota. He received his MD from the University of Minnesota and trained in internal medicine at the Hennepin County Medical Center. His PhD is in experimental and clinical pharmacology, also from the University of Minnesota. He trained in addiction medicine at The Rockefeller University where he continued as Director of Clinical Research until moving to Minnesota where is is co-PI of the NorthStar Node of the NIDA Clinical Trials Network. His areas of expertise include clinical pharmacology and the pharmacological management of opioid dependence. 

    His current research areas include the population pharmacokinetics of methadone, genetic influences of methadone pharmacology and treatment outcome, electronic health record privacy provisions of 42 CFR Part 2, and clinical decision support tool development for SUD. 

    He is Chair of the Life-Long Learning and Self-Assessment committee for the American Board of Addiction Medicine and is ASAM Region VI (IA, IL, IN, MI, MN, WI) director. Internationally, he is co-director of the SAMHSA-funded Vietnam HIV and Addiction Technology Transfer Center and provides ongoing technical assistance for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration in South East and Central Asia.

    Alexander Y. Walley

    MD, MSc, FASAM

    Alexander Y. Walley, M.D., M.Sc., is an Associate Professor of Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, a general internist and addiction medicine specialist at Boston Medical Center. He is the director of the Addiction Medicine Fellowship program and founded the Inpatient Addiction Consult Service at Boston Medical Center. He does clinical and research-related work on the medical complications of substance use, specifically HIV and overdose. He provides primary care and office-based buprenorphine treatment for HIV patients and methadone maintenance treatment. He is the medical director for the Massachusetts Department of Public Health’s Opioid Overdose Prevention Pilot Program. 

    Lia Bennett

    MPH

    Lia Bennett is an independent consultant serving as the Director of Maintenance of Certification for the American Board of Addiction. She was a quality improvement program coordinator for the American College of Physicians and brings to ABAM, over 10 years of experience developing and managing MOC compliant programs. She has worked in the field of internal medicine conducting continuing medical education research in the areas of adult immunization, cardiovascular risk and diabetes. Ms. Bennett received her Masters of Public Health with a graduate certificate in Integrative Health. She strives to provide superior guidance to ABAM Diplomates.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Hepatitis C Prevention, Management and Treatment for Addiction Medicine Practitioners (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ , while learning how to summarize and describe CDCs Hepatitis C testing and treatment guidelines, and describe successful models of programs in opioid substitution treatment programs and addiction treatment centers, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn that, globally, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major health issue among people who inject drugs (PWID). Within 1 year of injecting drugs, 1 of 3 individuals will become infected with HCV. Overall, 70 to 77% of PWID are HCV positive. There is a growing burden of HCV-related cirrhosis, liver cancer, and liver-related mortality, particularly among those infected for many decades. Perhaps even more concerning is the growing number of younger individuals newly infected with HCV through injection opiate use (Zibbell, 2014) (Colvin, 2010). 

    The advent of simple and well-tolerated oral HCV therapeutic regimens – direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) – with cure >95% has the potential to reverse the rising tide of advanced liver disease and with cure, prevent disease transmission (Grebely, 2017). These effective DAAs have eliminated interferon as a major barrier to HCV scale-up in PWID. 

    However, in order for these therapies to have an effect at a population-level, targeted interventions to enhance HCV testing, linkage to care, and treatment are needed. The reluctance to offer HCV therapy to PWID often still stems from concerns around treatment adherence, poorer outcomes, and the potential risk for HCV reinfection (Grebely, 2017). This reluctance exists despite growing evidence that HCV can be successfully treated among active drug users (Muething, 2015). 

    Furthermore, stigma and judgement regarding drug use and addiction among traditional HCV treaters has led to mistrust and reluctance to seek care by providers (Feller, 2013). This workshop will review the epidemiology of HCV among PWID, and effective strategies to enhance HCV testing, linkage to care and treatment for PWID. A particular focus will be given to the role of addiction medicine practitioners in preventing and treating HCV, especially in substance treatment facilities.

    Alain H. Litwin

    MD, MPH

    Alain Litwin, MD, MPH is Vice Chair of Academics and Research and Professor of Medicine at Greenville Health System, University of South Carolina School of Medicine – Greenville, and Clemson University School of Health Research where he is launching a Center for Addiction and Prevention Research.  He is board certified in internal medicine and addiction medicine, and has been providing medical care to people who use drugs with complex social, psychiatric and medical needs within an integrated primary care and substance use treatment program since 2000. As HCV Medical Director at Albert Einstein’s Division of Substance Abuse, he developed a comprehensive on-site HCV treatment program and peer educator program to improve medical care of HCV-infected people who use drugs. As HCV Treatment Network Director at Montefiore Medical Center, he expanded patient-centered models of care at many community health centers serving thousands of HCV-infected people throughout the Bronx.  With funding from NIH, PCORI, CMS, CDC, AHRQ, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, New York State Department of Health, New York City Department of Health, and industry, Dr. Litwin’s research has been focused on developing and studying models of HCV care, and on advocating for increasing access to effective care for all HCV-infected patients.  Dr. Litwin has worked with government and community organizations on efforts to expand access to HCV treatment and has collaborated on policy statements, clinical guidelines, treatment improvement protocols, task forces, and educational curricula with the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York State Department of Health, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, American Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependence, and the American Society of Addiction Medicine.  Dr. Litwin serves on the Executive Board for the International Network on Hepatitis in Substance Users (INHSU).

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Opening Scientific Plenary & Distinguished Scientist Lecture (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while you learn about the incredible impact addiction medicine providers can have on an individual, policy, and the future of treatment and science, from this conference recording at The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018). This session was made available free of charge by ASAM.

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will be energized as Dr. Kelly J. Clark, MD, MBA, DFASAM, leads the Opening Scientific Plenary Session, focusing on the incredible impact addiction medicine providers can have on an individual, policy, and the future of treatment and science.

    Elinore F. McCance-Katz

    MD, PhD

    Elinore F. McCance-Katz, MD, PhD, is the first Assistant Secretary for Mental Health and Substance Use. She advises the Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary on improving behavioral healthcare in America and leads the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), an agency responding to the nation’s opioid crisis. Dr. McCance-Katz fervently supports evidence-based early intervention, treatment, and recovery services for people who have mental health and substance use disorders. Dr. McCance-Katz has more than 25 years of experience as a clinician, teacher, and researcher.

    Michael E. Charness

    MD

    Michael E. Charness, MD, became Chief of Staff for the VA Boston Healthcare System in 2003. His laboratory, with support from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the VA, studies the mechanisms of alcohol toxicity in the nervous system and the development of drugs that block alcohol toxicity. Dr. Charness is scientific director of the NIAAA-funded Collaborative Initiative on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, and chairs the external advisory board for the NIH-funded Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. He has cared for patients with neurological complications of alcohol use disorder and peripheral nerve disorders throughout his career.

    Judy Collins

    Singer/Songwriter, Musician

    Judy Collins is a modern-day renaissance woman who is also an accomplished songwriter, painter, filmmaker, record label head, musical mentor, and a high-demand speaker for mental health and addiction. She will share her story about addiction, personal triumph, how an addiction doctor helped her understand for the first time that she had a disease, and how she could get help and change her life. Ms. Collins continues to inspire audiences with sublime vocals, boldly vulnerable songwriting, and music of hope and healing that speaks to the heart.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.