Catalog Advanced Search

Search by Categories
Search in Packages
Search by Format
Search by Type
Search by Date Range
Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
Start
End
Search by Keyword
Sort By
  • Policy Plenary: State Policy Approaches to Addiction Medicine Access and Quality (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning from state policy experts and officials who will discuss state-level strategies to improve addiction medicine quality and access; from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018). This session was made available free of charge by ASAM until 11/16/18.

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn that while the federal government has taken some steps to improve access to and the quality of addiction treatment in recent years, many states also have been busy passing a flurry of laws and writing regulations related to addiction prevention, treatment, and recovery. States hit hard by the opioid overdose epidemic have established Task Forces, declared states of emergency, applied for federal waivers to transform their Medicaid programs, issued naloxone standing orders, and established countless other policies to reduce opioid prescriptions, promote harm reduction strategies, fund treatment, or regulate addiction treatment services. Each state has taken a different approach, but some trends have emerged, allowing for a comparative analysis of policies’ effectiveness and predictions for what policy changes clinicians can expect at home. 

    This Policy Plenary will:

    1. Feature state policy experts and officials who will discuss state-level strategies to improve addiction medicine quality and access;
    2. Highlight examples of policies that have worked well and those that have had unintended consequences, and 
    3. Help equip attendees to be effective advocates for good addiction policies in their states.

    Jay C. Butler

    MD, FAAP, MACP, FIDSA

    Jay C. Butler, MD, CPE, FAAP, MACP, FIDSA was appointed Chief Medical Officer for the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services and Director of the Division of Public Health by Governor Bill Walker in December 2014. He is a graduate of the University of North Carolina Medical School, has completed numerous post-doctoral clinical trainings at Vanderbilt and Emory Universities, and maintains board certifications in infectious diseases, internal medical, and pediatrics. He has authored or co-authored over 100 scientific papers and medical textbook chapters on infectious diseases, vaccines, public health and emergency preparedness. He is an affiliate professor of medicine at the University of Alaska Anchorage. 

    From 2010 to 2014, Dr. Butler was Senior Director for Community Health Services at the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in Anchorage, where he was also a clinical infectious diseases consultant and Medical Director for Infection Control and Employee Health. Earlier work includes serving as Chief Medical Officer of the Alaska Department of Health Social Services from 2007 to 2009, Alaska State Epidemiologist, 2005-07, Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Arctic Investigations Program, 1998-2005, medical epidemiologist in CDC’s National Center for Infectious Diseases in Atlanta, 1991-98, and CDC Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer assigned to the Wisconsin Division of Public Health, 1989-91. 

    He completed over 23 years of service as a U.S. Public Health Service medical officer. He served as Governor of the Alaska Chapter of the American College of Physicians from 2005 to 2009 and was the 2017 President of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. He is a founding member of the new Alaska Chapter of the American Society of Addiction Medicine.

    Daniel Blaney-Koen

    JD, MFA

    Daniel Blaney-Koen, JD, is a senior legislative attorney with the American Medical Association Advocacy Resource Center (ARC). The ARC attorneys focus on working with state and specialty medical societies on state legislative, regulatory and policy advocacy. In addition to his work in the ARC, Daniel has held several roles at the AMA, including serving as a public information officer, policy analyst and speechwriter. Currently, Daniel focuses on state legislation and policy concerning the nation’s opioid epidemic, with particular emphasis on overdose prevention and treatment. Daniel also covers other pharmaceutical issues, insurance market reforms and other issues. Prior to joining the AMA in 1999, Daniel earned his Master of Fine Arts in Poetry from Colorado State University, and his Bachelor's Degree from the University of Arizona. He earned his law degree from the Loyola University Chicago School of Law. Daniel, his wife, two young sons and daughter live in Chicago, Illinois.

    Paul H. Earley

    MD, DFASAM

    Dr. Earley has worked in Addiction Medicine for over 30 years. He treats all types of addictive disorders and specializes in the assessment, treatment and management of health care professionals. As a therapist, he works with patients already in recovery, providing long term therapy for those who suffer from this disease. His professional expertise extends to advocacy for professionals before agencies and licensing boards. 

    Dr. Earley is a dynamic speaker and educator; he speaks and trains on topics of addiction, its treatment and addiction among health care professionals. In addition, he trains therapists about the neurobiological basis of psychotherapy. In his travels, he has provided training in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Italy, Iceland and Switzerland.

    He is the author of two books and several research articles on addiction and its treatment. His most recent book, RecoveryMind Training is an innovative and comprehensive process designed to reengineer addiction treatment. He is a contributing author to the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) Textbook: Principles of Addiction Medicine, as author of the chapter: Physician Health Programs and Addiction among Physicians. He is a contributing author to the ASAM Criteria. His work was featured in the documentary series on addiction entitled Close to Home by Bill Moyers.

    Currently, Dr. Earley is the Medical Director of the Georgia Professionals Health Program, Inc., the Physicians Health Program (PHP) for the state of Georgia and the President-elect of the Federation of State Physician Health Programs (FSPHP). Dr. Earley is the current president-elect of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM). He is a Distinguished Fellow of ASAM and has served on the board of ASAM for over 14 years in several capacities.

    Alexandra Duncan

    DrPH, MPH

    Alexandra Duncan is a senior officer with Pew's substance use prevention and treatment initiative, which works on federal and state initiatives to reduce the inappropriate use of prescription opioids and increase access to evidence-based treatment for substance use disorders. Before joining Pew, Duncan was a research associate at IMPAQ International LLC, where she supported the Center for Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight on issues related to Affordable Care Act compliance with prescription drug and nondiscrimination regulations for high-cost medical conditions, including opioid use disorder, as well as evaluation of health programs. 

    Previously, she was a senior analyst for Abt Associates, working in the division of U.S. health, public health, and epidemiology practice on several projects related to HIV testing and the integration of HIV treatment and substance abuse treatment. Duncan completed postdoctoral training in drug dependence epidemiology at John Hopkins University’s Bloomberg School of Public Health after earning a doctor of public health degree from Columbia University. She also holds a master’s degree in public health from Tulane University and a bachelor’s degree from Bryn Mawr College.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Peering Through the Smoke: Update on Adolescent and Young Adult Tobacco Use (1 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning how to recognize trends in adolescent tobacco use from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn about recent trends in youth smoking and alternate tobacco product use. Behind the steady decrease in traditional cigarette smoking rates in adolescents and young adults hides a new pattern of tobacco and nicotine addiction. E-cigarettes, hookahs, ‘poppers’ (the combination of tobacco and marijuana), and chewable forms of tobacco are increasingly popular among today’s youth, with evidence showing that e-cigarettes are attracting a group of young smokers who most likely would have otherwise never smoked. Less studied and unequally regulated when compared with traditional cigarettes, these alternate tobacco forms present both a challenge and an opportunity for clinicians and policymakers. This session will offer a comprehensive perspective on adolescent and young adult smoking in North America. It will aim to uncover and explore some of tobacco’s newer and alternate forms while highlighting important associations with other substance such as marijuana, and co-morbid medical and mental health conditions. Building on the presenters’ experience with in-patient and outpatient primary, secondary and tertiary care adolescent and young adult populations, the interactive nature of this workshop will allow participants to share challenges and examples from their own practice. Attendees will also have the opportunity to develop new skills and approaches for tobacco prevention and cessation with youth in a rapidly evolving context. This highly interactive workshop will combine short lectures, case simulations and small group discussions. The first part of the workshop will highlight new and emerging forms of tobacco as well as current challenges associated with youth tobacco consumption. Presenters will share compelling new data and evidence on the topic. The second part of the workshop will consist of an interactive presentation including small group discussions about approaches to tobacco prevention and cessation specifically adapted for adolescents and young adults. The third portion of the workshop will consist of case discussions integrating elements from the first two sections of the workshop in a small group discussion format allowing exchange of best practices. Workshop presenters will complement small group presentations with key findings and recommendations from the literature. The workshop will conclude with a large group debrief where participants will have the opportunity to share, comment and ask questions about the case scenarios discussed or other aspects of the workshop.

    Nicholas Chadi

    MD

    Nicholas Chadi is a pediatrician specialized in Adolescent Medicine and is currently a Fellow in Pediatric Addiction Medicine at Boston Children's Hospital. Nicholas grew up in Montreal, Canada, and obtained his medical degree at McGill University. He completed his core pediatric residency at Sainte-Justine University Hospital Center in Montreal where he became chief resident in 2014-2015. He recently completed his sub-specialty training in Adolescent Medicine at the Hospital for Sick Children and a journalism fellowship at the Munk School of Global Affairs in Toronto. He is currently enrolled as a Maters of Public Health student at the Harvard Chan School of Public Health.  His primary research interest is in the prevention and treatment of adolescent tobacco and marijuana use. He recently published a policy statement and practice point on tobacco prevention and cessation for the Canadian Pediatric Society and is part of the 2018 class of Ruth Fox Scholars.

    Karen Leslie

    MD, MEd

    Karen Leslie, MD, MEd is a Professor at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario.

    Trisha Tulloch

    MD, MSc

    Dr. Trisha Tulloch is an Adolescent Medicine Specialist and Lecturer in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Toronto. She completed her Pediatric residency training at Nationwide Children's Hospital and she completed her fellowship training in Adolescent Medicine at the Hospital for Sick Children. Dr. Tulloch is staff pediatrician with the youth concurrent disorders program at the Center for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Toronto. She is a coauthor and faculty instructor for the Youth and Young Adult Tobacco Cessation course through CAMH and the University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine Continuing Education and Professional Development program.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Bridging Gaps: Developing Immediate Access SUD Care in the Face of Crisis (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning learn what an immediate access, low threshold, transitional drop-in clinic looks like, treating close to 500 patients with Substance Use Disorder since 2016, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn what immediate access clinical care looks like, as seen through The Massachusetts General Hospital Bridge clinic; a multidisciplinary, immediate access low threshold transitional clinic which has provided over 4039 visits to 460 patients since opening in 2016. We offer medication management, recovery coaching and optional peer-support and psychoeducation groups to individuals unable to access care in the community. The primary goal is to engage people by “meeting them where they are," and to initiate pharmacotherapy, followed by stabilization and eventually linkage to community based treatment. Flexible drop-in scheduling is critical to our model. Half of all visits are not scheduled ahead and 80% of patients have at some point utilized same day appointments while 63% have utilized walk in services. The 30 day readmission rate for Bridge Clinic patients who have had a recent inpatient stay is only 10.4 %. This clinic also serves in a complementary role to an inpatient addiction consult team (ACT), the emergency department, the obstetrics department, as well as all outpatient departments. The Bridge Clinic provides a "consult and return model" for complex patients cared for in the MGH primary care clinics who need stabilization in a low threshold environment, as well as to mentor newly waivered buprenorphine providers and trainees. 

    This focus session will describe the need for such models of care, lessons learned, review of outcomes and the nuts and bolts needed to start and run this type of clinic model, providing attendees with concrete tools to start their own Bridge Clinic.

    Laura Kehoe

    MD, MPH, FASAM

    Laura Kehoe, MD, MPH, FASAM, is a medical director at the Bridge Clinic, Substance Use Disorder Initiative, for the Massachusetts General Hospital.  Dr. Kehoe is also Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and is board certified in both Internal Medicine and Addiction Medicine. She attended Tufts University School of Medicine and Boston University School of Public Health and completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital. At Massachusetts General Hospital, she is the Medical Director of the Substance Use Disorder Bridge Clinic, an innovative, “on demand,” urgent care addiction program, and an attending physician on the inpatient Addiction Consult Team (ACT). In addition, she is the co-chair of the hospital-wide Substance Use Disorder Education Committee, where she works with other team members to expand evidence-based treatment of patients with addiction, and is actively involved in resident physician training.

    Sarah Wakeman

    MD, FASAM

    Sarah E. Wakeman, MD is the Medical Director for the Mass General Hospital Substance Use Disorder Initiative, program director of the Mass General Addiction Medicine fellowship, and an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. She is also the Medical Director of the Mass General Hospital Addiction Consult Team, co-chair of the Mass General Opioid Task Force, and clinical lead of the Partners Healthcare Substance Use Disorder Initiative. She is the Medical Director of RIZE Massachusetts, a state-wide, private sector initiative created to build a $50 million fund to implement and evaluate innovative interventions to address the opioid overdose crisis. She received her A.B. from Brown University and her M.D. from Brown Medical School. She completed residency training in internal medicine and served as Chief Medical Resident at Mass General Hospital. She is a diplomate and fellow of the American Board of Addiction Medicine. She is chair of the policy committee for the Massachusetts Society of Addiction Medicine. She served on Massachusetts' Governor Baker’s Opioid Addiction Working Group. Nationally, she is chair of the American Society of Addiction Medicine Drug Court Task Force and serves on their ethics committee.Clinically she provides specialty addiction and general medical care in the inpatient and outpatient setting at Mass General Hospital and the Mass General Charlestown Health Center. Her research interests include evaluating models for integrated substance use disorder treatment in medical settings, recovery coaching, physician attitudes and practice related to substance use disorder, and screening for substance use in primary care.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Fentanyl and Analogs, Oh My: Their Impact on Patients and Public Health (1 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about the myths and facts of fentanyl and analogs from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn about the origins, prevalence, known pharmacology, and harmful clinical effects of fentanyl, fentanyl analogs, and other novel non-fentanyl opioids, as well as the treatment response including naloxone dosing. 

    We are presently in the midst of a massive opioid epidemic, partly due to a recent increase in heroin adulterated with fentanyl and its analogs.(Rudd 2016) Deaths from heroin overdoses began to rise in 2009 with overdoses associated with synthetic analogs rapidly increasing since 2013.(Rudd 2016;Peterson 2016) Although fentanyl was the initial adulterant found during the present epidemic, multiple other analogs such as carfentanil, acetylfentanyl, and butyrylfentanyl, as well as other non-fentanyl-derived opioids such as U-47700 are increasingly found in the heroin supply.(Lucyk 2017) There were eight seizures involving acetylfentanyl in 2013 with the number rising to 2001 in 2015.(Prekupec 2017) In addition to their increased prevalence, these analogs are incredibly potent. As an example, carfentanil is 10,000 times more potent than morphine and 100 times more so than fentanyl.(Wax 2003) The pharmacokinetics of novel fentanyl analogs such as their duration of effect or the amount of naloxone required for reversal is not well described in the published literature. As such, this makes it difficult to understand the potential effects on patients who are exposed to these opioids. While little is available in the peer-reviewed literature, much is written in the lay press regarding purported toxicity from ambient secondary exposures to healthcare providers and law enforcement officers. Many of these reports about first responders describe toxicity from routes of exposure that are pharmacologically implausible and portray symptoms inconsistent with an opioid overdose. Unfortunately, these sensationalistic reports rapidly disseminated leading to increasing concern and potentially poorly informed and dangerous decision-making about first responder and healthcare workers’ safety. Given the prevalence and morbidity of these agents, testing our patients for fentanyl has increased relevance, and rapid immunoassays are under development. Although advanced laboratory testing can identify some fentanyl analogs, this is expensive, not widely available, and not sufficiently rapid to impact patient care. Rapid testing may be beneficial to public health and law enforcement officials when identifying outbreaks and to improve risk communication. Clinical benefit, however, is unclear given the need to generally make decisions prior to the results returning. Our focus group plans to discuss what is known about these novel opioids and their impact on both clinical care and public health concerns

    Evan Schwarz

    MD

    Dr. Evan Schwarz is an Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine at the Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis. He is the Medical Toxicology section chief and directs their inpatient and outpatient clinical services. This includes managing inpatients with substance use disorders as well as following them in the outpatient toxicology and addiciton medicine clinic. In addiction to his clinical activities, he is a core faculty member of the emergency medicine residency, the Vice President for the Missouri College of Emergency Physicians, and a member of the Board of Directors for the American College of Medical Toxicology.

    JoAn Laes

    MD

    JoAn Laes, MD, Attending Physician, Division of Addiction Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN; Core Medical Toxicology Faculty, Minnesota Poison Control System, Minneapolis, MN; Medical Director, Mission Detox Center, Plymouth, MN and 1800 Detox, Minneapolis, MN, ASAM Medical Toxicology workgroup Chair.Dr. Laes' practice is focused on inpatient addiction medicine and toxicology consultation and outpatient treatment of opioid and other substance use disorders. She is board certified in Internal Medicine, Addiction Medicine, and Medical Toxicology. She completed internal medicine residency at Hennepin County Medical Center and medical toxicology fellowship at Regions Hospital in St. Paul, Minnesota.

    Lewis Nelson

    MD

    Dr. Nelson is Professor and Vice-Chair in the Department of Emergency Medicine at New York University School of Medicine, and an attending physician at both NYU Langone Medical Center and Bellevue Hospital Center. He is the Director of the Fellowship in Medical Toxicology at NYUSOM and the New York City Poison Control Center. He is a Past-President of the American College of Medical Toxicology, former Chair of the FDA Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory committee, and an editor of the textbook Goldfrank's Toxicologic Emergencies, now in its 10th edition. He organized the NYC Task Force on Opioid Misuse, and participated with the American College of Emergency Physicians Opioid Guideline Writing Panel, a CDC-funded panel of toxicologists and medical examiners to develop guidelines for the classification of opioid-related death, and the CDC Chronic Opioid Therapy Guideline Expert Panel. He continues to research, publish, and speak on the subject of prescription opioid misuse, drugs of abuse, and medication safety.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • New Approaches Using Contingency Management to Reduce Substance Use in the CJS (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about innovative ideas for reducing the substance use of individuals who are under criminal justice supervision and review evidence on program effectiveness, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn that, on a typical day in 2015, there were more than 4.7 million adults under community supervision and thousands of others awaiting trial in the community. An additional 2.2 million were incarcerated. With so many of those passing through the criminal justice system having a substance use problem, there are many millions of opportunities each year to reduce problematic substance use and promote public health and safety, almost all of which are missed. What should police officers, judges, and probation officers do when they believe reducing the substance use of individuals they encounter would benefit the user and/or society more generally? 

    This workshop, based on a chapter in the forthcoming ASAM textbook Principles of Addiction Medicine, will highlight innovative ideas for reducing the substance use of individuals who are under criminal justice supervision and review evidence on the effectiveness of such programs. We will begin with a discussion of the role of contingency management in reducing substance use, with a special focus on Physician Health Programs. In addition to reviewing evidence on the use of positive incentives in treatment and non-treatment settings, the workshop will also discuss a different—but theoretically consistent—approach involving frequent substance testing with swift, certain, and proportionate sanctions for violating judicial orders to abstain from consumption (e.g., 24/7 Sobriety). We will also discuss the pathways to treatment via criminal justice agencies ranging from drug courts to the oft-discussed Portuguese model that diverts those arrested for possessing small amounts of drugs to a “Commission for the Dissuasion of Drug Addiction” that is outside of the criminal justice system. We will not argue that one or the other of these approaches is the most effective or cost-effective; that would require randomized controlled trials and even then some approaches would work better for particular individuals. Rather, we view the collection as proof of the fallacy inherent in debating the merits of prison vs. treatment, and as an inspiration for those seeking to invent and evaluate additional creative implementations of the basic concept of contingency management.

    Robert L. DuPont

    MD, DFASAM

    For more than 40 years, Robert L. DuPont, M.D. has been a leader in drug abuse prevention and treatment. He served as the first Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (1973-1978) and as the second White House Drug Chief (1973-1977). From 1968-1970 he was Director of Community Services for the District of Columbia Department of Corrections, heading parole and half-way house services. From 1970-1973, he served as Administrator of the District of Columbia Narcotics Treatment Administration. Following this distinguished public career, in 1978 Dr. DuPont became the founding president of the Institute for Behavior and Health, Inc., a non-profit organization that identifies and promotes new ideas to reduce illegal drug use. He has been Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the Georgetown University School of Medicine since 1980. 

    A graduate of Emory University, Dr. DuPont received an M.D. degree in 1963 from the Harvard Medical School. He completed his psychiatric training at Harvard and the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. 

    Dr. DuPont is a Life Fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. His activities in ASAM include chairing the forensic science committee from 1995 to 2004, and serving as Co-Chair of the two White Paper writing committees that produced The Role of the Physician in “Medical” Marijuana in 2010 and State-Level Proposals to Legalize Marijuana in 2012. He served as Chair of the writing committee that produced Drug Testing: A White Paper of the American Society of Addiction Medicine in 2013. He is also a Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and was chairman of the Drug Dependence Section of the World Psychiatric Association from 1974 to 1979. In 1989 he became a founding member of the Medical Review Officer Committee of ASAM."

    Beau Kilmer

    PhD

    Beau Kilmer is a senior policy researcher at the RAND Corporation, where he codirects the RAND Drug Policy Research Center. He is also a professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School. His research lies at the intersection of public health and public safety, with a special emphasis on crime control, substance use, illicit markets, and public policy. Some of his current projects include assessing the consequences of alternative marijuana policies; measuring the effect of 24/7 Sobriety programs on drunk driving, domestic violence, and mortality; and evaluating other innovative programs intended to reduce crime. 

    Kilmer's articles have appeared in leading journals such as Lancet Psychiatry, New England Journal of Medicine, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and his commentaries have been published by CNN, Los Angeles Times, New York Times, Newsweek, San Francisco Chronicle, USA Today, Wall Street Journal, and other outlets. His co-authored book on marijuana legalization was published by Oxford University Press and the second edition was released in 2016. He serves as an assistant editor for Addiction and is a trustee of the International Society for the Study of Drug Policy. 

    Kilmer received a NHSTA Public Service Award for his “leadership and innovation in the areas of alcohol and drug-impaired driving program and policy research” and his co-authored work on 24/7 Sobriety received honorable mention for the Behavioural Exchange Award for Outstanding Research. Before earning his doctorate at Harvard University, Kilmer received a Judicial Administration Fellowship that supported his work with the San Francisco Drug Court.

    Keith Humphreys

    PhD

    Keith Humphreys is a Professor and the Section Director for Mental Health Policy in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University.  He is also a Senior Research Career Scientist at the VA Health Services Research Center in Palo Alto and an Honorary Professor of Psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, King's College, London.  His research addresses the prevention and treatment of addictive disorders, the formation of public policy and the extent to which subjects in medical research differ from patients seen in everyday clinical practice.

    For his work in the multinational humanitarian effort to rebuild the psychiatric care system of Iraq and in the national redesign of the VA health system's mental health services for Iraq war veterans, he won the 2009 American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Contribution to the Public Interest.  He and the authors of "Drug Policy and the Public Good" won the 2010 British Medical Association's Award for Public Health Book of the Year.

    Dr. Humphreys has been extensively involved in the formation of public policy, having served as a member of the White House Commission on Drug Free Communities, the VA National Mental Health Task Force, and the National Advisory Council of the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.  During the Obama Administration, he spent a sabbatical year as Senior Policy Advisor at the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy. He has also testified on numerous occasions in Parliament and advises multiple government agencies in the U.K.  

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Navigating the Minefield of Substance Use Testing: Understanding Your Patient's Report (1 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about the common pitfalls to urine and oral fluid drug testing from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn about to identify common pitfalls to urine and oral fluid drug testing in the setting of Substance Use Disorders.

    Appropriate use of drug testing for the treatment of Substance Use Disorders requires an intimate knowledge of the patient, the test and the prevalence of drug use in an area. With the variety of options for testing, selection of appropriate testing can be a challenge for providers. Recent American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) guidelines have provided an excellent overview of this field including an introduction to the types of testing and insightful observations (1, 2). Nonetheless, a very sophisticated understanding is required to successfully navigate the choices of immunoassay and chromatographic testing. Some common ways that the interpretation of a drug test's result can be significantly impacted include test cutoff levels, differences in antibody affinities from one immunoassay to another and length of detection windows. In a largely case-based format, this presentation will discuss several common questions that arise when interpreting urine drug testing. In these examples, we will review cases that hinge on the choice of testing method, challenges posed by questionable specimen validity, common drug mimics such as nutritional or natural therapies and the current limitations of testing practices in an ever-evolving landscape of designer and synthetic drug use. By the end of the session, participants will have insight into some of the strengths and challenges of drug testing based on current evidence.

    Jill Warrington

    MD, PhD

    Jill Warrington MD, PhD is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the Robert Larner MD College of Medicine at the University of Vermont. She also serves as Chief Medical Officer and Medical Director at Aspenti Health, a clinical toxicology laboratory that focuses on serving the Substance Use Disorder population and developing data-driven support tools that optimize best practices for providers. Jill earned her B.A. degree in Molecular Biology at Princeton University followed by an MD/PhD at Tufts University School of Medicine. She completed an Anatomic and Clinical Pathology residency at Duke University where she was chief resident. She has been in the field of laboratory medicine for approximately 15 years with a focus on clinical toxicology and appropriate test utilization.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Reducing Alcohol-Related Emergency Visits: An Innovative Model of Care to Improve Outcomes (1 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about an innovative rapid access medical withdrawal management service from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn about an innovative rapid access medical withdrawal management service.

    Background: Alcohol use accounts for up to 40% of Emergency Department (ED) visits, and a large proportion of 30-day ED re-visits, with alcohol intoxication and/or withdrawal being key presenting problems. Objective: To describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of a rapid access alcohol medical withdrawal management service (Alcohol Medical Intervention Clinic; AMIC) created to reduce 30-day alcohol-related ED revisits and increase access to care. Methods: AMIC, located at a regional addiction and mental health centre in Ottawa, Canada, was created in collaboration with hospital and community partners. Patients presenting to The Ottawa Hospital ED (multi-campus tertiary acute care hospital; TOH-ED) for an alcohol-related issue were referred to AMIC. Referred patients “walk-in” to AMIC post-discharge from the ED. AMIC’s multidisciplinary team provides assessment, treatment, triage, and navigation to community services. Collaborative, cross-institutional partnerships with hospital, community, and primary care providers ensure clients are seamlessly transitioned to appropriate levels of care. Patients presenting to AMIC (N=197) completed measures of sociodemographics, substance use, and mental health at intake and at 30-day follow-up. Clients also completed satisfaction measures. ED visit data on AMIC clients was collected via medical chart review. Data was also collected on all ED visits to The Ottawa Hospital for an alcohol-related cause during the year prior to, and following the launch of AMIC. Results: Most patients served in AMIC were male (65%), over 30 years old (81%), and presented within 3 days of referral (59%). At intake, nearly all clients reported hazardous/harmful drinking (98%) and moderate to severe alcohol dependence (74%), as well as use of other substances (90%) and intermediate-severe dependence on other substances (32%). Most clients reported moderate to severe depression (57%) and anxiety (69%). At 30-day follow-up, AMIC clients showed significant reductions in alcohol use as well as symptoms of depression and anxiety (p < .001). The majority of AMIC clients (61%) were assessed by a systems navigator and connected to additional community services. Clients report great satisfaction with the ease of access to care, timeliness of the service, and services received. For clients served by AMIC, there was an 83% reduction in 30-day TOH-ED revisit rates (p < .001). AMIC also impacted the overall TOH-ED system: When comparing alcohol-related TOH ED re-visits for all clients who visited the TOH-ED between May 25 2015-May 25 2016 and May 26 2016-May 26 2017 (when AMIC was launched), results demonstrated a 8.1% reduction in alcohol-related 30 day TOH-ED revisit rates, and a 10% reduction in alcohol-related TOH-ED visits. Conclusions: AMIC demonstrated positive impact on clients, the healthcare system, and our community. AMIC reduced ED utilization, increased access to care, improved substance use and mental health outcomes, connected patients with community services, and built system capacity to treat people with alcohol use disorders. Key to the success of AMIC is the development of collaborative cross-sectoral, inter-agency partnerships and seamless care pathways between hospital, mental health, community, and primary care services. Our model could be adapted to other regions similarly striving to manage alcohol problems in their regions.

    Kim Corace

    PhD, C Psych

    Dr. Kim Corace, PhD,CPsych., is the Director of Clinical Programming and Research in the Substance Use and Concurrent Disorders Program at The Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre, an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at University of Ottawa, a Clinical Investigator with the Institute of Mental Health Research, and a Clinical Health Psychologist. Working at regional, provincial, and national levels, her work focuses on improving treatment access and outcomes for vulnerable populations struggling with substance use and mental health co-morbidities, with a focus on developing collaborative care models. In 2013, the Ontario Ministry of Health Innovation Fund awarded the “Best Innovation in Mental Health Care Delivery” to Dr. Corace and her colleague for their Regional Opioid Intervention Service.

    Melanie Willows

    MD

    Dr. Melanie Willows (BSc MD CCFP CCSAM Diplomate ABAM) is an addiction medicine physician and is the Clinical Director of the Substance Use and Concurrent Disorders Program at The Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre. She is an Assistant Professor at the University of Ottawa, a diplomate with the American Board of Addiction Medicine and  president-elect of the Canadian Society of Addiction Medicine. Dr. Willows is committed to collaborating with clinicians and researchers to develop new services that address gaps in care for substance use and mental health problems. 

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Medications for Opioid Use Disorder: A Toolkit for Improving Practice (TIP) (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about SAMHSA's Toolkit for Improving Practice, or TIP, in response to the opioid crisis under the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016, which outlines up-to-date information about using medications to treat OUD in order to expand the use of effective treatments, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn that, opioid use disorder (OUD) has serious, increasingly significant effects on Americans’ health, social, and economic well-being. In response to a Congressional mandate contained in the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) initiated development of a Toolkit for Improving Practice (TIP) to respond to the opioid crisis. 

    Through this publication, SAMHSA aims to provide up-to-date information about using medications to treat OUD in order to expand the use of effective treatments and to reduce the negative consequences of OUD. This five-part TIP reviews the use of buprenorphine, methadone, and naltrexone. These three Food and Drug Administration-approved medications for the treatment of OUD have been shown in randomized clinical trials to reduce the use of illicit opioids and can play an important role in addressing the opioid epidemic. This TIP was drafted collaboratively by an Expert Panel and SAMHSA’s Knowledge Application Program content experts based on reviews of the literature and their own knowledge and experience. 

    A scientific review team provided feedback in an intensive, iterative drafting process. The draft was then field-reviewed by additional experts representing the TIP’s multiple target audiences, representatives of SAMHSA’s various Centers, and reviewers at 10 additional federal agencies prior to its finalization. The TIP is available for free on SAMHSA’s Publications Ordering webpage (www.store.samhsa.gov), where it can be accessed digitally or ordered in hard-copy format.

    • Part 1 is for all audiences. It introduces medications for OUD and lays the groundwork for understanding treatment concepts discussed in later parts of this TIP. 
    • Part 2 is for healthcare professionals in general medical and specialty addiction treatment settings. It offers guidance on screening, assessment, treatment, and referral for treatment of OUD. 
    • Part 3 is for healthcare professionals who wish to, or are providing pharmacotherapy for OUD. It reviews the use of medications to treat OUD as well as patient monitoring and counseling. 
    • Part 4 discusses how addiction treatment counselors and program administrators can collaborate with healthcare professionals and their patients treated with medications. 
    • Part 5 provides a collection of resources for all audiences. This session will review the major contents of the TIP with an emphasis on updates from the previous TIPS on buprenorphine and treatment in OTPs. 

    There will be an opportunity for dialogue with the presenters.

    Robert P. Schwartz

    MD

    Dr. Schwartz is a psychiatrist and Medical Director of the Friends Research Institute. He is Co-Principal Investigator of the Mid-Atlantic Node of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network. He has studied pharmacotherapy for Opioid Use Disorder in the community and in jail and prison through numerous NIDA grant award and has over 150 scientific publications. Dr Schwartz is Associate Professor of Psychiatry and is the recipient of the Dole-Nyswander Award from the American Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependence.

    Michelle R. Lofwall

    MD, DFASAM

    Dr. Lofwall completed residency training in Psychiatry and a clinical research fellowship in behavioral pharmacology at Johns Hopkins University. She now is an Associate Professor of Behavioral Science and Psychiatry in the Center on Drug and Alcohol Research at the University of Kentucky. She is a strong addiction treatment advocate and has an active outpatient addiction treatment practice. She also teaches residents, medical students, and other allied health professionals about treatment of substance use disorders. 

    She spends the majority of her time engaged in clinical research aimed at improving substance abuse treatment and better understanding the behavioral pharmacology of drugs of abuse. Dr. Lofwall is the immediate past President of the Kentucky Chapter of the American Society of Addiction Medicine, Editor of the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry newsletter, and member of the Kentucky Governor's state prescription monitoring program Advisory Council.

    Anthony Campbell

    RPH, DO, CDR, USPHS

    Dr. Anthony Campbell is currently a board eligible candidate in the field of addiction medicine who currently services as a Clinical Specialty Consultant with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment in the Division of Pharmacologic Therapies (SAMHSA/CSAT/DPT). He and serves as a Commander in the United States Public Health Service. In his role at SAMHSA, he is responsible for planning, directing and evaluating the development of pharmacotherapy-based treatment standards and guidelines that require specialized DPT medical review. In addition he is an adjunct professor at both Howard University Colleges of Pharmacy and Medicine in Washington DC.

    Dr. Campbell earned two bachelor’s degrees from Howard University; Chemistry (85) and Pharmacy (88). He earned his Doctorate of Osteopathic Medicine from Ohio University (94). Additional training followed including a residency in Internal Medicine, with current board certification.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Psychiatry for Non-Psychiatrists: The DSM-5 Express (1.5 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning about psychiatric and medical co-morbidities from a psychiatrist perspective. This conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018), serves as a fundamentals of psychiatry and is designed strictly for non-psychiatrist addiction medicine professionals.

    (1.5 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn about the prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use appears to be increasing, yet attention to it has not been commensurate with its prevalence and impact on health and society. It seems to be hidden or forgotten. First we will review data (some, conflicting) on the rising prevalence and impact of alcohol use on health, and the role alcohol plays in consequences of other drug use. Next, we will discuss validated approaches for identification, challenges in assessment relevant to general health settings, and initial management. Management of alcohol withdrawal will be reviewed by clinical champions contributing to ASAM's practice guideline revision. We will review the evidence for the 4 FDA approved medications and address the efficacy or lack thereof for others. Finally, we address integrated care management for alcohol use disorder including generalists and addiction specialist roles. The main goal is to review what clinical science tells us about how to care for people with unhealthy alcohol use.

    Petros Levounis

    MD, MA, DFASAM

    Dr. Levounis is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Stanford University where he studied chemistry and biophysics before receiving his medical education at Stanford University School of Medicine and the Medical College of Pennsylvania. During medical school, he received an MA degree in sociology from Stanford before moving to New York City where he trained in psychiatry at Columbia University. He graduated from Columbia receiving the National Institute of Mental Health Outstanding Resident Award and went on to complete his fellowship in addiction psychiatry at New York University. From 2002 to 2013, he served as director of the Addiction Institute of New York.
    Dr. Levounis has written numerous articles and monographs; has lectured extensively on addiction topics throughout the United States and abroad; and has been interviewed by all major television networks. Dr. Levounis serves on the Board of Directors of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) and from 2005 to 2009 chaired the national Committee on Addiction Treatment of the American Psychiatric Association. Dr. Levounis is a Betty Ford Scholar, a recipient of a U.S. State Department Speaker and Specialist Award, a distinguished fellow of the APA and ASAM, and an honorary member of the World Psychiatric Association. 

    Dr. Levounis has published thirteen books including the self-help paperback “Sober Siblings: How to Help Your Alcoholic Brother or Sister—and Not Lose Yourself,” the textbook of “Substance Dependence and Co-Occurring Psychiatric Disorders,” “The Behavioral Addictions,” “Motivational Interviewing for Clinical Practice,” “Becoming Mindful,” and the “Office-Based Buprenorphine Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder,” now in its second edition. His books have been translated into German, Hungarian, Japanese, Portuguese, and Spanish. 

    Dr. Levounis is married to actor Lukas Hassel and lives in New York City.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.

  • Transitions in Care and Linkage to Treatment from Acute Care Settings (1 CME)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Medical Credits Offered

    Earn 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ while learning, through multiple cases, about barriers and solutions of care of the addicted patient in the acute care setting and how to integrate with community resources and outpatient care, from this conference recording from The ASAM 49th Annual Conference (2018).

    (1.0 CME) In this conference recording from the 2018 Annual Conference, you will learn that people with substance use disorders (SUD) have high rates of emergency care, hospitalization, readmission, long lengths of stay, and skyrocketing healthcare costs. Yet, models for improving care of patients with addiction in the emergency room or hospital setting are limited. The acute care setting can provide reachable moments for initiating addiction care. Medications for opioid and alcohol use disorders can be initiated promoting engagement in outpatient SUD care and MAT, with potential to reduce readmissions and morbidity associated with SUD. 2-6 Workshop attendees will work through multiple cases revolving around models of addiction care transition from the emergency room and inpatient hospital setting. 

    Three unique protocols being used by the workshop presenters at their respective institutions will be discussed. Attendees will better understand the barriers and solutions of care of the addicted patient in the acute care setting and how to integrate with community resources and outpatient care. 

    1. Inpatient Care with transition to Opioid Treatment Program or Office Based Pharmacotherapy - An addiction medicine consultation team, comprised of medical providers and licensed alcohol and drug counselors (LADC), provides consultations to inpatient medical-surgical units and inpatient psychiatry units of a 500 bed hospital. The majority of consults are to pharmacotherapy management services for patients with alcohol and opioid use disorder. A unique aspect of the service is the ability to refer to the hospital affiliated opioid treatment program or office based addiction clinic for continuation of pharmacotherapy management. 
    2. Emergency Medicine Care with transition to affiliated Addiction Psychiatry Clinic – Opioid withdrawal management in the emergency department includes observation for withdrawal and medication protocols using buprenorphine. Upon discharge, follow up is scheduled within days at a hospital affiliated Addiction Psychiatry clinic, staffed by an addiction psychiatrist as well as a physician board certified in Emergency Medicine, Addiction Medicine, and Medical Toxicology. Clinic services include pharmacotherapy and outpatient treatment. 
    3. Emergency Medicine Bridge Clinic – patients that present to the ED in withdrawal or seeking help with opioid treatment are seen and evaluated in the ED. If appropriate, the patient will receive buprenorphine for withdrawal management and a follow-up appointment within 1-3 days with a physician board certified in Addiction Medicine, Emergency Medicine, and Medical Toxicology in an Emergency Room based clinic. Services include medical evaluation and PEER advocacy to provide bridging pharmacotherapy with buprenorphine, referrals and linkage to community resources and treatment programs.

    Ross Sullivan

    MD, FASAM

    Dr. Sullivan completed his medical school education at SUNY Upstate Medical University. After, he entered and finished a residency in Emergency Medicine at the same hospital.  Dr. Sullivan then completed a medical toxicology fellowship at the SUNY Upstate Poison Control Center and SUNY Upstate Emergency Department. Dr. Sullivan is also board certified in Addiction Medicine. 

    Dr. Sullivan is currently the medical director of medical toxicology and the fellowship director of the medical toxicology fellowship. He also is the director of the Upstate Emergency Medicine Opioid Bridge Clinic, as well as the medical director for Syracuse Behavioral Health.

    Dr. Sullivan has several publications related to overdose and addiction, including “Cardiac conduction disturbance after loperamide abuse”, “Synthetic Cannabinoid Withdrawal”, and  “Baclofen overdose mimicking brain death”.

    Dr. Sullivan currently is a member of the Medical Advisory Panel to OASAS (NYS Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services), the NYS -DOH buprenorphine work group, and Co-Chair of the Health Care Provider subcommittee of the Onondaga County Task force. 

    JoAn Laes

    MD

    JoAn Laes, MD, Attending Physician, Division of Addiction Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN; Core Medical Toxicology Faculty, Minnesota Poison Control System, Minneapolis, MN; Medical Director, Mission Detox Center, Plymouth, MN and 1800 Detox, Minneapolis, MN, ASAM Medical Toxicology workgroup Chair.Dr. Laes' practice is focused on inpatient addiction medicine and toxicology consultation and outpatient treatment of opioid and other substance use disorders. She is board certified in Internal Medicine, Addiction Medicine, and Medical Toxicology. She completed internal medicine residency at Hennepin County Medical Center and medical toxicology fellowship at Regions Hospital in St. Paul, Minnesota.

    Alaina Steck

    MD

    Dr. Alaina R. Steck, MD is an Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine at Grady Memorial Hospital, in the Emory Department of Emergency Medicine. She completed her residency training in Emergency Medicine at Boston Medical Center in Boston, MA and her fellowship in Medical Toxicology at the Emory / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Combined Fellowship in Medical Toxicology, followed by board certification in Addiction Medicine. She currently serves as the Medical Director of the Grady Medication-Assisted Opioid Treatment clinic, clerkship director for Medical Toxicology, Assistant Director at the Georgia Poison Center, and co-chair of the Drug Safety Task Force of the Injury Prevention Reserach Center at Emory.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s).  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1 LLSA credits towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (tMOC)

    This course has been approved by the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). Physicians enrolled in the ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification Program (tMOC) can apply a maximum of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™ for completing this course.