ASAM Virtual 2020

4.33 (40 votes)

  • Register
    • Non-Member - $699
    • Regular Member - $525
    • Retired - $525
    • Early Career Physician - $525
    • Resident - $349
    • Student - $349
    • Associate - $349
    • ASAM Staff - Free!
    • International Member - $525
    • Emeritus Member - $525
    • Provisional Member - $525
    • Fellow Member - $525
    • Honorary Member - $525
    • CRT Member - $525

ASAM is offering this new virtual experience which will provide high-quality education, innovative topics, sessions, posters and supplemental virtual courses in a completely online platform. 

Learning Objectives

At the end of the live event, participants should be able to:

  • Identify and describe the new developments affecting the science, policy, and clinical practice of addiction medicine.
  • Compare presented clinical guidelines/best practices with the participant's current practice and identify strengths or gaps.
  • Analyze new research and science to develop practical applications for treatment or further research.
  • Explain recent or upcoming policy changes and identify implications or areas for provider involvement.

Activities

  • Two days of live-streaming content from nationally-recognized and respected thought leaders from across the country (available on-demand after the live event)
  • Multiple offerings of live webinars on diverse topics that will be presented throughout the month of April (available on-demand after the live event)
  • Pre-recorded sessions on best practices and new developments affecting science, policy, and clinical practice of addiction medicine (available on-demand beginning in April)
  • An online poster gallery of over 100 scientific posters in a dynamic viewing format with audio-narration from the presenters (available on-demand beginning in April)


  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The prevalence of substance use disorder (SUD) among individuals involved in the criminal justice (CJ) system is well documented. There are numerous calls for public health interventions addressing SUD within CJ systems. This session will provide on-the-ground examples of effective health care- criminal justice partnerships at multiple sequential intercepts. Panelists will discuss cognitive behavioral therapy-based and motivational interviewing-based programming in New South Wales prison system and initiatives in Cook County to link individuals to medications for addiction treatment and recovery support in pre-trial services, jail, and adult probation. Through panel discussion and small group exercises, attendees will explore key drivers of successful collaboration as well as challenges and how to address them.

    The prevalence of substance use disorder (SUD) among individuals involved in the criminal justice (CJ) system is well documented.  There are numerous calls for public health interventions addressing SUD within CJ systems. This session will provide on-the-ground examples of effective health care- criminal justice partnerships at multiple sequential intercepts. Panelists will discuss cognitive behavioral therapy-based and motivational interviewing-based programming in New South Wales prison system and initiatives in Cook County to link individuals to medications for addiction treatment and recovery support in pre-trial services, jail, and adult probation. Through panel discussion and small group exercises, attendees will explore key drivers of successful collaboration as well as challenges and how to address them.

    Learning Objectives
    – Define the sequential intercept model and how it provides a framework for public health interventions to divert individuals with SUD in the criminal justice system towards health.
    – Describe examples of successful health-CJ partnerships in numerous settings including pre-trial, jails and prisons, and adult probation.
    – Explain how potentially varying perspectives, goals, responsibilities, and motivations of each stakeholder in a health-CJ partnership may help or hinder effective partnership, and identify potential solutions to any challenges.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    CME/CE Credits

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    NAADAC, the Association for Addiction Professionals

    This activity has been approved by the American Society of Addiction Medicine, as a NAADAC Approved Education Provider, for educational credits. NAADAC Provider #295, ASAM is responsible for all aspects of the programming.

    California Association for Drug/Alcohol Educators (CAADE)

    This educational program is approved by CAADE: #CP40 999 1222

    California Association of DUI Treatment Centers (CADTP)

    This educational program is approved by CADTP: #205

    Continuing Education Credits (CEUs)

    Non-physician participants will receive a certificate of attendance upon completion of the activity and an online evaluation confirming their participation. Participants should submit his/her certificate of attendance to their professional organization/institute.

    Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credit towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABA Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    This activity contributes to the CME component of the American Board of Anesthesiology’s redesigned Maintenance of Certification in Anesthesiology TM (MOCA®) program, known as MOCA 2.0®.

    ABP Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the activity, with individual assessments of the participant and feedback to the participant, enables the participant to earn a maximum of 1.5 MOC points in the American Board of Pediatrics’ (ABP) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABP MOC credit.

     ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn up to 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (Tmoc)

    Successful completion of this activity can be used to satisfy the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) for Tmoc as credits towards ABAM LLSA Part II requirements.

    American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN)

    Successful completion of this CME activity can be used to satisfy the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology’s (ABPN) CME requirement for Maintenance of Certification program.

    Program Planning Committee, CME Committee, Medical Education Council (MEC), and Faculty Disclosure Information

    In accordance with disclosure policies of ASAM and the ACCME, the effort is made to ensure balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all CME activities. These policies include resolving all possible conflicts of interest for the Planning Committees, CME Committee, MEC, and Faculty. All activity Planning Committee members and Faculty have disclosed relevant financial relationship information. The ASAM CME Committee has reviewed these disclosures and determined that the relationships are not inappropriate in the context of their respective presentations and are not inconsistent with the educational goals and integrity of the activity. View all disclosures here.

  • Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The gap of treatment availability for patients with an opioid use disorder and existing providers highlights the importance of more provider training. This session uses national survey data on medical school curricula to review the status of medical education in addiction medicine and opioid related topics. Participants will be introduced to a DATA 2000-approved medical student waiver training. This course addresses the treatment gap through an enhancement of medical school curriculum. Participants will observe examples of online videos, the faculty guide, and assessment tool. The session will showcase innovative early adoption of the course and ways it may be implemented within a school’s existing curriculum. Questions, suggestions and comments will be encouraged.

    The gap of treatment availability for patients with an opioid use disorder and existing providers highlights the importance of more provider training. This session uses national survey data on medical school curricula to review the status of medical education in addiction medicine and opioid related topics. Participants will be introduced to a DATA 2000-approved medical student waiver training.  This course addresses the treatment gap through an enhancement of medical school curriculum. Participants will observe examples of online videos, the faculty guide, and assessment tool. The session will showcase innovative early adoption of the course and ways it may be implemented within a school’s existing curriculum. Questions, suggestions and comments will be encouraged.

    Learning Objectives
    Explain the current status of addiction medicine education in medical schools in the United States.
    Describe the variable ways in which the waiver training can be taught in medical schools.
    Evaluate the importance of this training independent of the specialty the student chooses to pursue.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    CME/CE Credits

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    NAADAC, the Association for Addiction Professionals

    This activity has been approved by the American Society of Addiction Medicine, as a NAADAC Approved Education Provider, for educational credits. NAADAC Provider #295, ASAM is responsible for all aspects of the programming.

    California Association for Drug/Alcohol Educators (CAADE)

    This educational program is approved by CAADE: #CP40 999 1222

    California Association of DUI Treatment Centers (CADTP)

    This educational program is approved by CADTP: #205

    Continuing Education Credits (CEUs)

    Non-physician participants will receive a certificate of attendance upon completion of the activity and an online evaluation confirming their participation. Participants should submit his/her certificate of attendance to their professional organization/institute.

    Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credit towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABA Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    This activity contributes to the CME component of the American Board of Anesthesiology’s redesigned Maintenance of Certification in Anesthesiology TM (MOCA®) program, known as MOCA 2.0®.

    ABP Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the activity, with individual assessments of the participant and feedback to the participant, enables the participant to earn a maximum of 1.5 MOC points in the American Board of Pediatrics’ (ABP) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABP MOC credit.

     ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn up to 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (Tmoc)

    Successful completion of this activity can be used to satisfy the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) for Tmoc as credits towards ABAM LLSA Part II requirements.

    American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN)

    Successful completion of this CME activity can be used to satisfy the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology’s (ABPN) CME requirement for Maintenance of Certification program.

    Program Planning Committee, CME Committee, Medical Education Council (MEC), and Faculty Disclosure Information

    In accordance with disclosure policies of ASAM and the ACCME, the effort is made to ensure balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all CME activities. These policies include resolving all possible conflicts of interest for the Planning Committees, CME Committee, MEC, and Faculty. All activity Planning Committee members and Faculty have disclosed relevant financial relationship information. The ASAM CME Committee has reviewed these disclosures and determined that the relationships are not inappropriate in the context of their respective presentations and are not inconsistent with the educational goals and integrity of the activity. View all disclosures here.

  • Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Opioid therapy for chronic pain can cause dose-dependent harm. Increased clinician adherence to opioid prescribing guidelines for chronic pain can improve health outcomes and reduce inappropriate opioid prescribing. However, lack of consensus regarding recommended practices and quality of care metrics present barriers to improving care. Presenters will discuss practical issues related to the “measurability” of selected quality metrics in the context of quality improvement and implementation research projects. This presentation will provide a foundation for using patient-centered quality of care metrics, collected as part of routine clinical care and extracted through the electronic health record, to assess patient treatment outcomes and project implementation impact.

    Opioid therapy for chronic pain can cause dose-dependent harm. Increased clinician adherence to opioid prescribing guidelines for chronic pain can improve health outcomes and reduce inappropriate opioid prescribing. However, lack of consensus regarding recommended practices and quality of care metrics present barriers to improving care. Presenters will discuss practical issues related to the “measurability” of selected quality metrics in the context of quality improvement and implementation research projects. This presentation will provide a foundation for using patient-centered quality of care metrics, collected as part of routine clinical care and extracted through the electronic health record, to assess patient treatment outcomes and project implementation impact.

    Learning Objectives
    – Upon completion, participant will be able to list patient-centered quality of care metrics appropriate for use in patients with chronic non-cancer pain treated with long-term opioid therapy.
    – Upon completion, participant will be able to describe how metrics can be collected as part of routine care and in the electronic health record.
    – Upon completion, participant will be able describe the importance of aligning clinical practice guidelines and recommendations with reliable electronic health record measures.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    CME/CE Credits

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    NAADAC, the Association for Addiction Professionals

    This activity has been approved by the American Society of Addiction Medicine, as a NAADAC Approved Education Provider, for educational credits. NAADAC Provider #295, ASAM is responsible for all aspects of the programming.

    California Association for Drug/Alcohol Educators (CAADE)

    This educational program is approved by CAADE: #CP40 999 1222

    California Association of DUI Treatment Centers (CADTP)

    This educational program is approved by CADTP: #205

    Continuing Education Credits (CEUs)

    Non-physician participants will receive a certificate of attendance upon completion of the activity and an online evaluation confirming their participation. Participants should submit his/her certificate of attendance to their professional organization/institute.

    Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credit towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABA Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    This activity contributes to the CME component of the American Board of Anesthesiology’s redesigned Maintenance of Certification in Anesthesiology TM (MOCA®) program, known as MOCA 2.0®.

    ABP Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the activity, with individual assessments of the participant and feedback to the participant, enables the participant to earn a maximum of 1.5 MOC points in the American Board of Pediatrics’ (ABP) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABP MOC credit.

     ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn up to 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (Tmoc)

    Successful completion of this activity can be used to satisfy the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) for Tmoc as credits towards ABAM LLSA Part II requirements.

    American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN)

    Successful completion of this CME activity can be used to satisfy the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology’s (ABPN) CME requirement for Maintenance of Certification program.

    Program Planning Committee, CME Committee, Medical Education Council (MEC), and Faculty Disclosure Information

    In accordance with disclosure policies of ASAM and the ACCME, the effort is made to ensure balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all CME activities. These policies include resolving all possible conflicts of interest for the Planning Committees, CME Committee, MEC, and Faculty. All activity Planning Committee members and Faculty have disclosed relevant financial relationship information. The ASAM CME Committee has reviewed these disclosures and determined that the relationships are not inappropriate in the context of their respective presentations and are not inconsistent with the educational goals and integrity of the activity. View all disclosures here.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The world has changed substantially since the first Surgeon General’s Report on smoking more than fifty years ago. New tobacco products like e-cigarettes have emerged, medical research has advanced, and technology has expanded. These changes have both challenged and enhanced how we approach and treat tobacco use and dependence, and more research is needed to meet these challenges. Join us for an in-depth conversation about how this evolving environment impacts your practice: learn how to clinically approach treatment in a shifting tobacco product landscape; understand new behavioral counseling delivery modalities, pharmacotherapy approaches, and strategies for integrating tobacco treatment into routine care; and hear about how findings from the new 2020 Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking Cessation can influence your practice.

    The world has changed substantially since the first Surgeon General’s Report on smoking more than fifty years ago. New tobacco products like e-cigarettes have emerged, medical research has advanced, and technology has expanded. These changes have both challenged and enhanced how we approach and treat tobacco use and dependence, and more research is needed to meet these challenges. Join us for an in-depth conversation about how this evolving environment impacts your practice: learn how to clinically approach treatment in a shifting tobacco product landscape; understand new behavioral counseling delivery modalities, pharmacotherapy approaches, and strategies for integrating tobacco treatment into routine care; and hear about how findings from the new 2020 Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking Cessation can influence your practice.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    A new public health crisis is emerging: the surge in overdose deaths due to cocaine and methamphetamine use. While there are effective treatments (albeit poorly adopted) for smoking cessation, the evidence base for the treatment of stimulant disorder, is at best, preliminary. TMS is one of those emerging treatment modalities which has shown promise in regulating the disrupted neurocircuitry in stimulant addiction. The presenters will provide an overview of the current empirical literature and identify research gaps in the utility of TMS in the management of stimulants such as cocaine, methamphetamine and tobacco use disorders, as well as its application to the practice of Addiction Medicine.

    A new public health crisis is emerging: the surge in overdose deaths due to cocaine and methamphetamine use. While there are effective treatments (albeit poorly adopted) for smoking cessation, the evidence base for the treatment of stimulant disorder, is at best, preliminary. TMS is one of those emerging treatment modalities which has shown promise in regulating the disrupted neurocircuitry in stimulant addiction. The presenters will provide an overview of the current empirical literature and identify research gaps in the utility of TMS in the management of stimulants such as cocaine, methamphetamine and tobacco use disorders, as well as its application to the practice of Addiction Medicine.

    Learning Objectives
    – demonstrate increased knowledge mechanism of action of TMS on the modulating brain neurocircuitry impacted in persons with cocaine, methamphetamine and nicotine use disorders
    – increase awareness of the research findings on the efficacy of TMS in addressing craving, withdrawal, abstinence in substance abusing patients
    – better understand how the research findings on TMS in the management of stimulant use disorders maybe applied in clinical practice

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Perinatal drug use increases the risk of addiction in exposed children and is a critical topic for addiction medicine providers. This session aims to educate providers on: 1) in utero teratogenic effects of common drugs of abuse, 2) intricacies of drug testing, including current neonatal drug testing techniques and comparing them to maternal drug testing, 3) differentiating between toxicity and withdrawal syndromes associated with prenatal exposures, 4) misconceptions about breastfeeding while on medication-assisted treatment, and 5) the impact of prenatal exposures on development. By increasing provider knowledge, presenters hope to empower providers caring for pregnant patients with active or previous substance use and children with in utero exposure to drugs of abuse.

    Perinatal drug use increases the risk of addiction in exposed children and is a critical topic for addiction medicine providers. This session aims to educate providers on: 1) in utero teratogenic effects of common drugs of abuse, 2) intricacies of drug testing, including current neonatal drug testing techniques and comparing them to maternal drug testing, 3) differentiating between toxicity and withdrawal syndromes associated with prenatal exposures, 4) misconceptions about breastfeeding while on medication-assisted treatment, and 5) the impact of prenatal exposures on development. By increasing provider knowledge, presenters hope to empower providers caring for pregnant patients with active or previous substance use and children with in utero exposure to drugs of abuse.

    Learning Objectives
    1. Describe the effects of common drugs of abuse on fetal development. 
    2. Recognize benefits and pitfalls of common neonatal drug screens
    3. Differentiate between neonatal toxicity and withdrawal syndromes associated with prenatal drug exposure
    4. Identify common toxicological myths surrounding opioid medication therapy and breastfeeding
    5. Recognize effects common drugs of abuse have on early childhood development & adolescence

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Information will be provided for attendees who are Certified by ABPM in Addiction Medicine about the ABPM’s transition from its Maintenance of Certification program (MOC) to its innovative new Continuing Certification Program (CCP). The ABPM presenters will outline the transitional requirements for maintaining ABPM Certification for calendar years 2020, 2021 and 2022 as well as discussing the specifics of the 2023 rollout of the CCP, including a shift from the every 10-year, secure, high-stakes MOC Exam to a longitudinal assessment methodology.

    Information will be provided for attendees who are Certified by ABPM in Addiction Medicine about the ABPM’s transition from its Maintenance of Certification program (MOC) to its innovative new Continuing Certification Program (CCP).  The ABPM presenters will outline the transitional requirements for maintaining ABPM Certification for calendar years 2020, 2021 and 2022 as well as discussing the specifics of the 2023 rollout of the CCP, including a shift from the every 10-year, secure, high-stakes MOC Exam to a longitudinal assessment methodology.

    Learning Objectives
    Identify the transitional requirements for Certification in Addiction Medicine for calendar years 2020, 2021 and 2022.
    – Detail the requirements of the CCP which begin in 2023 and impact the Certification in Addiction Medicine
    – Discuss the ABPM’s shift from the every 10-year, secure, high-stakes MOC Exam to a longitudinal assessment methodology.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Physicians who are or have previously been certified by at least one American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) Member Board can now become certified in the subspecialty of addiction medicine by the American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM). This session will review the requirements and various pathways available for physicians to apply to sit for the Addiction Medicine subspecialty exam. Information on the timeline for the 2020 application cycle, dates for the examination period, and fee schedule will also be made available. For more information visit www.theabpm.org.

    Physicians who are or have previously been certified by at least one American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) Member Board can now become certified in the subspecialty of addiction medicine by the American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM). This session will review the requirements and various pathways available for physicians to apply to sit for the addiction medicine subspecialty exam. Information on the timeline for the 2020 application cycle, dates for the examination period, and fee schedule will also be made available. For more information visit www.theabpm.org.

    Learning Objectives
    – Identify the different pathways to certification in Addiction Medicine through ABPM.
    – Recognize requirements to be eligible for certification in Addiction Medicine through ABPM.
    – Discuss the application process and timeline for becoming certified in Addiction Medicine through ABPM.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    CME/CE Credits

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring activity for a maximum of .75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    NAADAC, the Association for Addiction Professionals

    This activity has been approved by the American Society of Addiction Medicine, as a NAADAC Approved Education Provider, for educational credits. NAADAC Provider #295, ASAM is responsible for all aspects of the programming.

    California Association for Drug/Alcohol Educators (CAADE)

    This educational program is approved by CAADE: #CP40 999 1222

    California Association of DUI Treatment Centers (CADTP)

    This educational program is approved by CADTP: #205

    California Consortium of Addiction Programs and Professionals (CCAPP)

    This educational program is approved by CCAPP: #OS-20-330-1222

    Continuing Education Credits (CEUs)

    Non-physician participants will receive a certificate of attendance upon completion of the activity and an online evaluation confirming their participation. Participants should submit his/her certificate of attendance to their professional organization/institute.

    Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of .75 LLSA credit towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABA Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    This activity contributes to the CME component of the American Board of Anesthesiology’s redesigned Maintenance of Certification in Anesthesiology TM (MOCA®) program, known as MOCA 2.0®.

    ABP Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the activity, with individual assessments of the participant and feedback to the participant, enables the participant to earn a maximum of .75 MOC points in the American Board of Pediatrics’ (ABP) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABP MOC credit.

    ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn up to .75 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

    American Board of Surgery (ABS)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the learner to earn credit toward the CME and/or Self-Assessment requirements of the American Board of Surgery’s Continuous Certification program. It is the CME activity provider's responsibility to submit learner completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABS credit

    American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN)

    Successful completion of this CME activity can be used to satisfy the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology’s (ABPN) CME requirement for Maintenance of Certification program

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (Tmoc)

    Successful completion of this activity can be used to satisfy the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) for Tmoc as credits towards ABAM LLSA Part II requirements.

    Program Planning Committee, CME Committee, Medical Education Council (MEC), and Faculty Disclosure Information

    In accordance with disclosure policies of ASAM and the ACCME, the effort is made to ensure balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all CME activities. These policies include resolving all possible conflicts of interest for the Planning Committees, CME Committee, MEC, and Faculty. All activity Planning Committee members and Faculty have disclosed relevant financial relationship information. The ASAM CME Committee has reviewed these disclosures and determined that the relationships are not inappropriate in the context of their respective presentations and are not inconsistent with the educational goals and integrity of the activity. View all disclosures here.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    People who use substances are at higher risk for treatable and preventable infectious diseases, but current models of care are insufficient for the rising epidemics. This presentation by Infectious Disease Addiction Medicine physicians from different states, will 1) review the epidemiology of IDU-associated infections in the United States 2) discuss best practice screening and prevention recommendations for addiction medicine providers, including pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV and harm reduction principals 3) showcase novel models of care that engage vulnerable individuals, and 4) review recent practice-changing international studies that highlight ID "hot topics," such as oral versus intravenous antibiotics, and use of multidisciplinary inpatient teams for serious bacterial infections in people who inject drugs.

    People who use substances are at higher risk for treatable and preventable infectious diseases, but current models of care are insufficient for the rising epidemics. This presentation by Infectious Disease Addiction Medicine physicians from different states, will 1) review the epidemiology of IDU-associated infections in the United States 2) discuss best practice screening and prevention recommendations for addiction medicine providers, including pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV and harm reduction principals 3) showcase novel models of care that engage vulnerable individuals, and 4) review recent practice-changing international studies that highlight ID "hot topics," such as oral versus intravenous antibiotics, and use of multidisciplinary inpatient teams for serious bacterial infections in people who inject drugs.

    Learning Objectives
    – Recognize interplay between Infectious Disease and Substance Use disorder epidemics
    – Identify new opportunities to incorporate recommended screening into practice settings 
    Plan collocated and multidisciplinary care in non-traditional locations

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    CME/CE Credits

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    NAADAC, the Association for Addiction Professionals

    This activity has been approved by the American Society of Addiction Medicine, as a NAADAC Approved Education Provider, for educational credits. NAADAC Provider #295, ASAM is responsible for all aspects of the programming.

    California Association for Drug/Alcohol Educators (CAADE)

    This educational program is approved by CAADE: #CP40 999 1222

    California Association of DUI Treatment Centers (CADTP)

    This educational program is approved by CADTP: #205

    Continuing Education Credits (CEUs)

    Non-physician participants will receive a certificate of attendance upon completion of the activity and an online evaluation confirming their participation. Participants should submit his/her certificate of attendance to their professional organization/institute.

    Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credit towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABA Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    This activity contributes to the CME component of the American Board of Anesthesiology’s redesigned Maintenance of Certification in Anesthesiology TM (MOCA®) program, known as MOCA 2.0®.

    ABP Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the activity, with individual assessments of the participant and feedback to the participant, enables the participant to earn a maximum of 1.5 MOC points in the American Board of Pediatrics’ (ABP) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABP MOC credit.

     ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn up to 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (Tmoc)

    Successful completion of this activity can be used to satisfy the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) for Tmoc as credits towards ABAM LLSA Part II requirements.

    American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN)

    Successful completion of this CME activity can be used to satisfy the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology’s (ABPN) CME requirement for Maintenance of Certification program.

    Program Planning Committee, CME Committee, Medical Education Council (MEC), and Faculty Disclosure Information

    In accordance with disclosure policies of ASAM and the ACCME, the effort is made to ensure balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all CME activities. These policies include resolving all possible conflicts of interest for the Planning Committees, CME Committee, MEC, and Faculty. All activity Planning Committee members and Faculty have disclosed relevant financial relationship information. The ASAM CME Committee has reviewed these disclosures and determined that the relationships are not inappropriate in the context of their respective presentations and are not inconsistent with the educational goals and integrity of the activity. View all disclosures here.

  • Product not yet rated Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The influence of parents on children’s attitudes and behaviors is immense, even in the face of countless environmental pressures to engage in unhealthy behaviors. A nationally representative survey of 1,014 teens examined the potential that parents have to reduce the risk of adolescent substance use as their children move from their impressionable pre-adolescent years to the more intransigent teen years. In addition to discussing this survey, presenters will share the findings from qualitative research that identified effective messages to motivate parents to take action, especially those concerned about teens who have begun to use substances but do not have a substance use disorder.

    The influence of parents on children’s attitudes and behaviors is immense, even in the face of countless environmental pressures to engage in unhealthy behaviors. A nationally representative survey of 1,014 teens examined the potential that parents have to reduce the risk of adolescent substance use as their children move from their impressionable pre-adolescent years to the more intransigent teen years. In addition to discussing this survey, presenters will share the findings from qualitative research that identified effective messages to motivate parents to take action, especially those concerned about teens who have begun to use substances but do not have a substance use disorder.

    Learning Objectives
    – Upon completion, participant will be able to describe current risk factors for adolescent substance use and the importance of positive, engaged parenting and monitoring in protecting teens from risk.
    – Upon completion, participant will be able to apply lessons from the survey and focus group findings to help bolster parenting skills and practices with regard to adolescent substance use risk and protection.
    – Upon completion, participant will be able to provide more effective psychoeducation and guidance regarding adolescent substance use to families within a health care setting.

ACCME Accredited with Commendation

CME/CE Credits

ACCME Accreditation Statement

The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

AMA Credit Designation Statement

The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 74.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

NAADAC, the Association for Addiction Professionals

This activity has been approved by the American Society of Addiction Medicine, as a NAADAC Approved Education Provider, for educational credits. NAADAC Provider #295, ASAM is responsible for all aspects of the programming.

California Association for Drug/Alcohol Educators (CAADE)

This educational program is approved by CAADE: #CP40 999 1222

California Association of DUI Treatment Centers (CADTP)

This educational program is approved by CADTP: #205

Continuing Education Credits (CEUs)

Non-physician participants will receive a certificate of attendance upon completion of the activity and an online evaluation confirming their participation. Participants should submit his/her certificate of attendance to their professional organization/institute.

Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 74.5 LLSA credit towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

ABA Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

This activity contributes to the CME component of the American Board of Anesthesiology’s redesigned Maintenance of Certification in Anesthesiology TM (MOCA®) program, known as MOCA 2.0®.

ABP Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the activity, with individual assessments of the participant and feedback to the participant, enables the participant to earn a maximum of 74.5 MOC points in the American Board of Pediatrics’ (ABP) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABP MOC credit.

 ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn up to 74.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (Tmoc)

Successful completion of this activity can be used to satisfy the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) for Tmoc as credits towards ABAM LLSA Part II requirements.

American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN)

Successful completion of this CME activity can be used to satisfy the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology’s (ABPN) CME requirement for Maintenance of Certification program.

Program Planning Committee, CME Committee, Medical Education Council (MEC), and Faculty Disclosure Information

In accordance with disclosure policies of ASAM and the ACCME, the effort is made to ensure balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all CME activities. These policies include resolving all possible conflicts of interest for the Planning Committees, CME Committee, MEC, and Faculty. All activity Planning Committee members and Faculty have disclosed relevant financial relationship information. The ASAM CME Committee has reviewed these disclosures and determined that the relationships are not inappropriate in the context of their respective presentations and are not inconsistent with the educational goals and integrity of the activity. View all disclosures here.