ASAM Virtual 2020

4.21 (28 votes)

  • Register
    • Non-Member - $699
    • Regular Member - $525
    • Retired - $525
    • Early Career Physician - $525
    • Resident - $349
    • Student - $349
    • Associate - $349
    • ASAM Staff - Free!
    • International Member - $525
    • Emeritus Member - $525
    • Provisional Member - $525
    • Fellow Member - $525
    • Honorary Member - $525
    • CRT Member - $525

ASAM is offering this new virtual experience which will provide high-quality education, innovative topics, sessions, posters and supplemental virtual courses in a completely online platform. 

Learning Objectives

At the end of the live event, participants should be able to:

  • Identify and describe the new developments affecting the science, policy, and clinical practice of addiction medicine.
  • Compare presented clinical guidelines/best practices with the participant's current practice and identify strengths or gaps.
  • Analyze new research and science to develop practical applications for treatment or further research.
  • Explain recent or upcoming policy changes and identify implications or areas for provider involvement.

Activities

  • Two days of live-streaming content from nationally-recognized and respected thought leaders from across the country (available on-demand after the live event)
  • Multiple offerings of live webinars on diverse topics that will be presented throughout the month of April (available on-demand after the live event)
  • Pre-recorded sessions on best practices and new developments affecting science, policy, and clinical practice of addiction medicine (available on-demand beginning in April)
  • An online poster gallery of over 100 scientific posters in a dynamic viewing format with audio-narration from the presenters (available on-demand beginning in April)


  • Health & Criminal Justice Partnerships to Address Substance Use: Opportunities & Challenges

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The prevalence of substance use disorder (SUD) among individuals involved in the criminal justice (CJ) system is well documented. There are numerous calls for public health interventions addressing SUD within CJ systems. This session will provide on-the-ground examples of effective health care- criminal justice partnerships at multiple sequential intercepts. Panelists will discuss cognitive behavioral therapy-based and motivational interviewing-based programming in New South Wales prison system and initiatives in Cook County to link individuals to medications for addiction treatment and recovery support in pre-trial services, jail, and adult probation. Through panel discussion and small group exercises, attendees will explore key drivers of successful collaboration as well as challenges and how to address them.

    The prevalence of substance use disorder (SUD) among individuals involved in the criminal justice (CJ) system is well documented.  There are numerous calls for public health interventions addressing SUD within CJ systems. This session will provide on-the-ground examples of effective health care- criminal justice partnerships at multiple sequential intercepts. Panelists will discuss cognitive behavioral therapy-based and motivational interviewing-based programming in New South Wales prison system and initiatives in Cook County to link individuals to medications for addiction treatment and recovery support in pre-trial services, jail, and adult probation. Through panel discussion and small group exercises, attendees will explore key drivers of successful collaboration as well as challenges and how to address them.

    Learning Objectives
    – Define the sequential intercept model and how it provides a framework for public health interventions to divert individuals with SUD in the criminal justice system towards health.
    – Describe examples of successful health-CJ partnerships in numerous settings including pre-trial, jails and prisons, and adult probation.
    – Explain how potentially varying perspectives, goals, responsibilities, and motivations of each stakeholder in a health-CJ partnership may help or hinder effective partnership, and identify potential solutions to any challenges.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    CME/CE Credits

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    NAADAC, the Association for Addiction Professionals

    This activity has been approved by the American Society of Addiction Medicine, as a NAADAC Approved Education Provider, for educational credits. NAADAC Provider #295, ASAM is responsible for all aspects of the programming.

    California Association for Drug/Alcohol Educators (CAADE)

    This educational program is approved by CAADE: #CP40 999 1222

    California Association of DUI Treatment Centers (CADTP)

    This educational program is approved by CADTP: #205

    Continuing Education Credits (CEUs)

    Non-physician participants will receive a certificate of attendance upon completion of the activity and an online evaluation confirming their participation. Participants should submit his/her certificate of attendance to their professional organization/institute.

    Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credit towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABA Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    This activity contributes to the CME component of the American Board of Anesthesiology’s redesigned Maintenance of Certification in Anesthesiology TM (MOCA®) program, known as MOCA 2.0®.

    ABP Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the activity, with individual assessments of the participant and feedback to the participant, enables the participant to earn a maximum of 1.5 MOC points in the American Board of Pediatrics’ (ABP) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABP MOC credit.

     ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn up to 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (Tmoc)

    Successful completion of this activity can be used to satisfy the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) for Tmoc as credits towards ABAM LLSA Part II requirements.

    American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN)

    Successful completion of this CME activity can be used to satisfy the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology’s (ABPN) CME requirement for Maintenance of Certification program.

    Program Planning Committee, CME Committee, Medical Education Council (MEC), and Faculty Disclosure Information

    In accordance with disclosure policies of ASAM and the ACCME, the effort is made to ensure balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all CME activities. These policies include resolving all possible conflicts of interest for the Planning Committees, CME Committee, MEC, and Faculty. All activity Planning Committee members and Faculty have disclosed relevant financial relationship information. The ASAM CME Committee has reviewed these disclosures and determined that the relationships are not inappropriate in the context of their respective presentations and are not inconsistent with the educational goals and integrity of the activity. View all disclosures here.

  • Hospital Based Addiction Medicine Cases & Challenges

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This workshop features national thought leaders in hospital-based addiction medicine care who will expertly discuss and describe treatment approaches to challenging addiction medicine cases. The session will describe clinical scenarios that challenge the inpatient medical team and will offer evidence-based approaches, including ways to integrate a diverse addiction medicine workforce into routine hospital-based care. Cases include management of post-operative pain in the setting of OUD, use of illicit substances by hospitalized patients, initiation of medication for opioid use disorder in patients prescribed full opioid agonists, and management of patients requiring prolonged intravenous antibiotics for complications of injection drug use including management of care transitions.

    This workshop features national thought leaders in hospital-based addiction medicine care who will expertly discuss and describe treatment approaches to challenging addiction medicine cases. The session will describe clinical scenarios that challenge the inpatient medical team and will offer evidence-based approaches, including ways to integrate a diverse addiction medicine workforce into routine hospital-based care. Cases include management of post-operative pain in the setting of OUD, use of illicit substances by hospitalized patients, initiation of medication for opioid use disorder in patients prescribed full opioid agonists, and management of patients requiring prolonged intravenous antibiotics for complications of injection drug use including management of care transitions.

    Learning Objectives
    Understand current trends in hospitalization related to substance use disorder
    Learn and apply tools to promote evidence-based addiction care in the hospital setting.
    – Describe common clinical scenarios that can be addressed with hospital-based addiction care.

  • An Update on the ASAM Guideline on Alcohol Withdrawal Management

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The presentation will highlight the development process for the ASAM Guideline on Alcohol Withdrawal Management, including the literature search and review, expert panels and outside review, and incorporation of membership comment. The session will reinforce the core concepts detailed in the guidance document for the management of patients with AWS in both the outpatient and inpatient settings. Areas of controversy will be highlighted, including assessment, monitoring, pharmacotherapy, and innovative strategies for the management of patients with a spectrum of withdrawal severity. Brief lectures, panel discussion, and case-based small-group efforts will be utilized.

    The presentation will highlight the development process for the ASAM Guideline on Alcohol Withdrawal Management, including the literature search and review, expert panels and outside review, and incorporation of membership comment. The session will reinforce the core concepts detailed in the guidance document for the management of patients with AWS in both the outpatient and inpatient settings. Areas of controversy will be highlighted, including assessment, monitoring, pharmacotherapy, and innovative strategies for the management of patients with a spectrum of withdrawal severity. Brief lectures, panel discussion, and case-based small-group efforts will be utilized.

    Learning Objectives
    – Describe the development process for the ASAM Guideline on Alcohol Withdrawal Management
    – Explain the innovative pharmacotherapy of alcohol withdrawal syndrome in the ambulatory setting
    – Discuss the management of patients with severe alcohol withdrawal syndrome in the inpatient or intensive care setting

  • Addressing the Alcohol in Alcohol-Related Cirrhosis: A Multidisciplinary Approach

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Alcohol-related liver disease (ALD) is now the leading indication for liver transplant, and successful disease management requires long-term alcohol abstinence. Alcohol use disorder (AUD) treatment is fundamental to managing ALD. These two co-occurring disorders are best managed by highly-cohesive multidisciplinary teams, yet such integrated ALD/AUD clinics are exceedingly rare. This 90-minute session will include didactic instruction and small group discussions led by an experienced multidisciplinary team to: a) depict the scope of the AUD/ALD problem and need for multidisciplinary care, b) review integrated alcohol-related care models, c) share strategies for developing multidisciplinary ALD clinics and, d) collaborate with the audience to consider how multi-disciplinary models can be applied at their home institutions.

    Alcohol-related liver disease (ALD) is now the leading indication for liver transplant, and successful disease management requires long-term alcohol abstinence. Alcohol use disorder (AUD) treatment is fundamental to managing ALD. These two co-occurring disorders are best managed by highly-cohesive multidisciplinary teams, yet such integrated ALD/AUD clinics are exceedingly rare. This 90-minute session will include didactic instruction and small group discussions led by an experienced multidisciplinary team to: a) depict the scope of the AUD/ALD problem and need for multidisciplinary care, b) review integrated alcohol-related care models, c) share strategies for developing multidisciplinary ALD clinics and, d) collaborate with the audience to consider how multi-disciplinary models can be applied at their home institutions.

    Learning Objectives
    – Upon completion, participants will be able to describe the growing alcohol-related liver disease crisis in the United States
    – Upon completion, participants will be able to describe ways to address alcohol use disorders in patients with alcohol-related liver disease using a multi-disciplinary team-based approach
    – Upon completion, participants will be able to define steps they can to take to create multi-disciplinary clinics at their home institutions.

    ACCME Accredited with Commendation

    CME/CE Credits

    ACCME Accreditation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    AMA Credit Designation Statement

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    NAADAC, the Association for Addiction Professionals

    This activity has been approved by the American Society of Addiction Medicine, as a NAADAC Approved Education Provider, for educational credits. NAADAC Provider #295, ASAM is responsible for all aspects of the programming.

    California Association for Drug/Alcohol Educators (CAADE)

    This educational program is approved by CAADE: #CP40 999 1222

    California Association of DUI Treatment Centers (CADTP)

    This educational program is approved by CADTP: #205

    Continuing Education Credits (CEUs)

    Non-physician participants will receive a certificate of attendance upon completion of the activity and an online evaluation confirming their participation. Participants should submit his/her certificate of attendance to their professional organization/institute.

    Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 1.5 LLSA credit towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

    ABA Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    This activity contributes to the CME component of the American Board of Anesthesiology’s redesigned Maintenance of Certification in Anesthesiology TM (MOCA®) program, known as MOCA 2.0®.

    ABP Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the activity, with individual assessments of the participant and feedback to the participant, enables the participant to earn a maximum of 1.5 MOC points in the American Board of Pediatrics’ (ABP) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABP MOC credit.

     ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

    Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn up to 1.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

    ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (Tmoc)

    Successful completion of this activity can be used to satisfy the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) for Tmoc as credits towards ABAM LLSA Part II requirements.

    American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN)

    Successful completion of this CME activity can be used to satisfy the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology’s (ABPN) CME requirement for Maintenance of Certification program.

    Program Planning Committee, CME Committee, Medical Education Council (MEC), and Faculty Disclosure Information

    In accordance with disclosure policies of ASAM and the ACCME, the effort is made to ensure balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all CME activities. These policies include resolving all possible conflicts of interest for the Planning Committees, CME Committee, MEC, and Faculty. All activity Planning Committee members and Faculty have disclosed relevant financial relationship information. The ASAM CME Committee has reviewed these disclosures and determined that the relationships are not inappropriate in the context of their respective presentations and are not inconsistent with the educational goals and integrity of the activity. View all disclosures here.

  • WHO Risk Drinking Level: A Harm Reduction Measure for Alcohol Pharmacotherapy Trials

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Reduction of "harmful drinking" is an increasingly requested goal of pharmacotherapy for Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD). A public-private partnership, the Alcohol Clinical Trials Initiative (ACTIVE), has developed a large database on the use of the World Health Organization (WHO) risk drinking level reduction as a salient, and clinically meaningful, outcome/endpoint for AUD clinical trials. This symposium will present data on its validity and use, and also share how it might be useful in communicating risks related to certain levels of alcohol consumption and the improvements in health and function related to WHO risk drinking level reduction. This approach could be acceptable to a range of AUD individuals seeking treatment, thereby increasing their motivation to seek treatment.

    Reduction of "harmful drinking" is an increasingly requested goal of pharmacotherapy for Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD). A public-private partnership, the Alcohol Clinical Trials Initiative (ACTIVE), has developed a large database on the use of the World Health Organization (WHO) risk drinking level reduction as a salient, and clinically meaningful, outcome/endpoint for AUD clinical trials. This symposium will present data on its validity and use, and also share how it might be useful in communicating risks related to certain levels of alcohol consumption and the improvements in health and function related to WHO risk drinking level reduction. This approach could be acceptable to a range of AUD individuals seeking treatment, thereby increasing their motivation to seek treatment.

    Learning Objectives
    – to contemplate how harm reduction might be a suitable goal for pharmacotherapy of Alcohol Use Disorder
    – become familiar with the WHO risk drinking reduction categories/levels and how these levels correspond to psychosocial and heath consequences of drinking
    – see how WHO risk drinking risk level reduction, short of abstinence, improves various psychosocial and health outcomes

  • Publishing Addiction Science

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This session is for anyone who wishes to publish in the area of addiction science, particularly fellows, junior faculty and those who do not regularly publish. Presenters will share how to choose a journal, how to prepare papers for submission, how to report research, how to respond to reviewers and editors, and publication-related ethical issues. Presenters will address primary research articles as well as review articles, case reports and others. The link to the book Publishing Addiction Science (free) will be made available. The Editors and Editorial Fellows will lead discussion with participants regarding questions and challenges they have faced. Participants are encouraged to bring brief examples of their writing or peer reviews.

    This session is for anyone who wishes to publish in the area of addiction science, particularly fellows, junior faculty and those who do not regularly publish. Presenters will share how to choose a journal, how to prepare papers for submission, how to report research, how to respond to reviewers and editors, and publication-related ethical issues. Presenters will address primary research articles as well as review articles, case reports and others. The link to the book Publishing Addiction Science (free) will be made available. The Editors and Editorial Fellows will lead discussion with participants regarding questions and challenges they have faced. Participants are encouraged to bring brief examples of their writing or peer reviews.

    Learning Objectives
    – Select an appropriate peer-reviewed journal in which to publish your work
    – Respond to editor requests for revision
    – Submit and publish addiction science papers for publication


  • Policy & Science Session: Marijuana Legalization: What Addiction Medicine Providers Need to Know

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This plenary session, moderated by ASAM President Elect William F. Haning, MD, DFASAM, will explore what is known about the impacts of state marijuana policy changes on substance use related outcomes and will provide an overview of current research on the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids.

    State laws and public perceptions regarding marijuana have been changing rapidly. Addiction treatment providers need to be prepared to talk to their patients in a clear and unbiased way about both the risks associated with marijuana and what is known about its therapeutic potential. This plenary session, moderated by ASAM President Elect William F. Haning, MD, DFASAM, will explore what is known about the impacts of state marijuana policy changes on substance use related outcomes and will provide an overview of current research on the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids. Speakers will also provide guidance on how to effectively communicate what we do and do not know on these topics. These talks will be followed by a panel discussion with treatment providers on how they discuss these issues with their patients, challenges they face, and how they address them.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Describe what is known about impacts of state marijuana policy changes on substance use related outcomes
    2. Discuss with patients in a clear and unbiased way about both the risks associated with marijuana and what is known about its therapeutic potential
    3. Identify potential challenges and solutions to discussing marijuana with patients
  • Opening Scientific Session & Distinguished Scientist Lecture

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ASAM Virtual 2020 begins with the energizing Opening Scientific Session. This session will be led by ASAM President Paul H. Earley, MD, DFASAM, bringing together distinguished presenters in the field of addiction medicine.

    ASAM Virtual 2020 begins with the energizing Opening Scientific Session. This session will be led by ASAM President Paul H. Earley, MD, DFASAM, bringing together distinguished presenters in the field of addiction medicine.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Apply best practices for treating OUD during the pregnant and parenting period
    2. Recognize CDC’s multi-sector effort to address the drug overdose epidemic by engaging those in health systems and public safety
    3. Empathize and understand how childhood experiences with addiction can shape perspectives on addiction in adulthood
  • Motivational Interviewing: Strategic Patient Engagement and Reflective Listening

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The workshop engages participants using principles of motivational interviewing in the teaching methodology to build participants’ motivation to use and familiarity with the technique of motivational interviewing in clinical practice.

    The workshop engages participants using principles of motivational interviewing in the teaching methodology to build participants’ motivation to use and familiarity with the technique of motivational interviewing in clinical practice. Real play and other practical exercises will give participants the experience to implement the motivational interviewing approach immediately into their practice. Participants will practice informal coding of an interaction followed by review and discussion to learn how to identify factors that facilitate the motivational interview, and how to gauge success by learning to listen for change talk.

    Learning Objectives
    – Participants will be able to explain and understand how to use the spirit of MI
    – Participants will be able to identify and utilize MI micro-skills to facilitate a conversation with patients
    – Participants will be able to identify change talk, “coding” an MI encounter, and perform these in clinical practice

  • Methamphetamine 2020: An Update

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Methamphetamine (MA) use continues to be a significant public health problem in some parts of the US. Overdose deaths associated with MA in the United States have escalated rapidly since 2015, including MA-related deaths involving fentanyl. During this session, research on MA will be discussed including common clinical challenges in treating individuals with MA use disorders which includes powerful craving, hypersexuality, anhedonia, cognitive deficits, and poor retention in treatment. Additionally, medication for MA use disorder treatment will be presented such as: topirimate, mirtazapine, bupropion, naltrexone, amphemtamine/methylphenidate. Behavioral interventions, which are the mainstay of MA use disorder treatment, will be reviewed. Examples of these interventions that will be discussed are contingency management, the community reinforcement approach, Matrix Model and exercise.

    Methamphetamine  (MA) use continues to be a significant public health problem in some parts of the US.   Overdose deaths associated with MA in the United States have escalated rapidly since 2015, including MA-related deaths involving fentanyl. During this session, research on MA will be discussed including common clinical challenges in treating individuals with MA use disorders which includes powerful craving, hypersexuality, anhedonia, cognitive deficits, and poor retention in treatment.  Additionally, medication for MA use disorder treatment will be presented such as: topirimate, mirtazapine, bupropion, naltrexone, amphemtamine/methylphenidate.  Behavioral interventions, which are the mainstay of MA use disorder treatment, will be reviewed. Examples of these interventions that will be discussed are contingency management, the community reinforcement approach, Matrix Model and exercise.

    Learning Objectives
    1. Understand the current extent and geography of methamphetamine use
    2. Acquire information about methamphetamine effects and clinical issues
    3. Understand the current status of treatments for methamphetamine dependence.

ACCME Accredited with Commendation

CME/CE Credits

ACCME Accreditation Statement

The American Society of Addiction Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

AMA Credit Designation Statement

The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 74.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

NAADAC, the Association for Addiction Professionals

This activity has been approved by the American Society of Addiction Medicine, as a NAADAC Approved Education Provider, for educational credits. NAADAC Provider #295, ASAM is responsible for all aspects of the programming.

California Association for Drug/Alcohol Educators (CAADE)

This educational program is approved by CAADE: #CP40 999 1222

California Association of DUI Treatment Centers (CADTP)

This educational program is approved by CADTP: #205

Continuing Education Credits (CEUs)

Non-physician participants will receive a certificate of attendance upon completion of the activity and an online evaluation confirming their participation. Participants should submit his/her certificate of attendance to their professional organization/institute.

Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

ABPM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

The American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM) has approved this activity for a maximum of 74.5 LLSA credit towards ABPM MOC Part II requirements.

ABA Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

This activity contributes to the CME component of the American Board of Anesthesiology’s redesigned Maintenance of Certification in Anesthesiology TM (MOCA®) program, known as MOCA 2.0®.

ABP Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the activity, with individual assessments of the participant and feedback to the participant, enables the participant to earn a maximum of 74.5 MOC points in the American Board of Pediatrics’ (ABP) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABP MOC credit.

 ABIM Maintenance of Certification (MOC)

Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn up to 74.5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

ABAM Transitional Maintenance of Certification (Tmoc)

Successful completion of this activity can be used to satisfy the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) for Tmoc as credits towards ABAM LLSA Part II requirements.

American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN)

Successful completion of this CME activity can be used to satisfy the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology’s (ABPN) CME requirement for Maintenance of Certification program.

Program Planning Committee, CME Committee, Medical Education Council (MEC), and Faculty Disclosure Information

In accordance with disclosure policies of ASAM and the ACCME, the effort is made to ensure balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all CME activities. These policies include resolving all possible conflicts of interest for the Planning Committees, CME Committee, MEC, and Faculty. All activity Planning Committee members and Faculty have disclosed relevant financial relationship information. The ASAM CME Committee has reviewed these disclosures and determined that the relationships are not inappropriate in the context of their respective presentations and are not inconsistent with the educational goals and integrity of the activity. View all disclosures here.